Would a "Business Improvement District" (BID) be good for Brixton?

Discussion in 'Brixton' started by Gramsci, Aug 12, 2012.

  1. Southlondon

    Southlondon The river's there for a reason

    But it’s begs the question, if the BID is so bad for the more numerous small businesses, why didn’t more of them bother to register their dissatisfaction by voting against it when they had the well publicised opportunity?
     
    8ball and alcopop like this.
  2. Southlondon

    Southlondon The river's there for a reason

    Don’t be silly
     
  3. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    You really can't think of any reason why struggling, over-worked small businesses may not be able to place the BID stuff as a priority? From my experience of talking to small readers, quite a few still don't even understand the concept or the need and they don't have the time to start working it all out.
     
  4. Gramsci

    Gramsci Well-Known Member

    I'm not. Its what you say in your post. Go back and read it again.
     
  5. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    What do you think of the self promoting banners the BID stuck all over town? Look like a good use of traders' money to you? How about those posters telling people to have a piss after they've been enjoying the much-pushed boozy night economy?
     
  6. Gramsci

    Gramsci Well-Known Member

    So far you've said I'm talking rubbish and being silly but you haven't engaged with issues I've brought up.
     
  7. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    You don't see any potential pitfalls to an undemocratic few deciding where some police resources are allocated in your area?
     
    brixtonblade and Gramsci like this.
  8. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    But NOT the majority of businesses. In the face of relentless propaganda for the BID - including the paid for glowing PR masquerading as journalism in the Bugle - I'd say its fucking vital that the hard facts are made public, and if it takes a tabloid-style approach to make people aware, that's fine by me.
     
    Gramsci likes this.
  9. alex_

    alex_ Well-Known Member

    10.9% of businesses voted against.

    Alex
     
    alcopop likes this.
  10. alex_

    alex_ Well-Known Member

    They are deciding where the police resources they pay for are allocated.

    This might displace street crime to places where there are less police.

    Alex
     
  11. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    So that is in effect a private police force, whose employment is not decided by the pubic, or by public need, but by the needs of the businesses who have most influence on the BID board. And you support this, right?
     
    Gramsci likes this.
  12. alex_

    alex_ Well-Known Member

    I’d be interested to know if the don’t piss in the street posters make a difference, id imagine they were very cheap compared to more toilets.
     
  13. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    What do you think? I'd say they made just about zero difference and were as useful as their pointless self-promoting banners.
     
  14. alex_

    alex_ Well-Known Member

    Hilarious. I’m pretty sure they are members of the met, so are in no way shape or form a private police force.

    Brixton BID have created some roles in the met, which are focused on the centre of Brixton. These will have replaced some of the hundreds of police roles in London cut in the last 5-10 years.

    How is this undemocratic ?

    Alex
     
  15. alex_

    alex_ Well-Known Member

    I think I’d I’d like to see some data, re arrests or complaints from residents.

    I’d imagine they made some difference, if I saw a poster on the way out of the pub saying “no toilets between here and the tube” I’d probably nip to the bog.

    Alex
     
  16. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    Can the public exert any influence over where these police are allocated YES/NO?

    There's your answer.
     
    Gramsci likes this.
  17. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    I'm out late in Brixton very, very often and I've seen absolutely no improvement. In fact, I've hardly even seen any of those posters either. People don't need posters. They need toilets.
     
    Gramsci likes this.
  18. alex_

    alex_ Well-Known Member

    They can call 999 and report a crime in central Brixton.

    I don’t see any issue with businesses paying for police and saying we want them to patrol the area we are in. It frees up other police to work elsewhere.

    Alex
     
  19. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    Here's some of the very valid criticisms levied against BIDs:

     
  20. DietCokeGirl

    DietCokeGirl [Your Ad Here]

    Not exactly accurate, only 59%of eligable buissnesses returned their ballot. I'dbe interesting to know more about why there was such a low number to votes returned.
     
    editor and Gramsci like this.
  21. Gramsci

    Gramsci Well-Known Member

    That is semi privatisation.

    Ive covered this in previous posts.

    Police are state/ public body. There to serve the public.

    As you said previously

    This isn't how policing is supposed to work.
     
    editor likes this.
  22. alex_

    alex_ Well-Known Member

    These are all valid criticisms, but until we have a central government which decides to fund councils properly. BIDs seem like a reasonable policy.

    You could ensure that smaller businesses none paying business were represented, by letting them be members for free.

    Alex
     
  23. Gramsci

    Gramsci Well-Known Member

    I'm still not clear what the pro BID argument here is.

    That it does good works for area that are in addition to publicly run services like street cleaning or policing or that its good idea because government "austerity" cuts mean an extra tax on business means cut services can be propped up.
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2018
    editor likes this.
  24. alex_

    alex_ Well-Known Member

    BIDs let districts collectively decide to raise additional funding to pay for improvements which benefit their businesses.

    Many of these services are services which have been cut back under austerity.

    It also means that some costs of businesses can be transferred back to those businesses which otherwise would be paid for by all rate payers.

    Alex
     
  25. Gramsci

    Gramsci Well-Known Member

    So this is extra tax on business to fund services they used to get anyway before they were cut in politically driven "austerity" cuts.
     
    editor likes this.
  26. Gramsci

    Gramsci Well-Known Member

    See your post 662.
     
  27. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    But that doesn't happen to smaller businesses have no representation or influence, while bigger businesses do. And the biggest sometimes end up with more people on the board than others...
     
  28. alex_

    alex_ Well-Known Member

    Which isn’t outlawed in the articles of association, but is a natural function of larger companies having more potential candidates.

    Alex
     
  29. alex_

    alex_ Well-Known Member

    I don’t think anyone is disputing this - this is 100% correct.
     
  30. alex_

    alex_ Well-Known Member

    There were 513 eligible businesses who could have voted, of that total 56 voted against.

    That’s 10.9%

    Alex
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice