What is this bush/tree/plant?

Discussion in 'suburban75' started by mrs quoad, Apr 14, 2011.

  1. bi0boy

    bi0boy Power User

  2. ringo

    ringo Macaroni cheese controller

    Think it would survive outside on a north facing wall?
     
  3. gentlegreen

    gentlegreen Sproutarian.

    Designers innit.

    Well at least the growth won't get out of hand ...

    I see it's sometimes known as "mistletoe cactus" ...
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2017
  4. Corax

    Corax Luke 5:16

    :hmm:

    "What's that?"

    "A Rhipsalis."

    "Oh. Right."


    "..."


    "..."
     
  5. Artaxerxes

    Artaxerxes Well-Known Member

    Not a tree, bush or plant but still.


    Comorant or Shag and why?

    _MG_86071709.jpg
     
  6. Callie

    Callie Pivoting

    Cormorant, I reckon. Where did you see it?

    Shags are quite a bit less common and tend to be coastal.

    Shag
     
  7. Artaxerxes

    Artaxerxes Well-Known Member

    On the river Taff while having a stroll up from Cardiff


    I'm erring towards Shag because of the headcrest
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2017
  8. Callie

    Callie Pivoting

    Artaxerxes likes this.
  9. extra dry

    extra dry Happy to be here

    This is in the garden of cousin who lives in New south wales Aus. Any ideas what it could be 20170423_093642.jpg 20170423_093642.jpg 20170423_093701.jpg
     
  10. gentlegreen

    gentlegreen Sproutarian.

    Definitely a mallow of some kind ...
     
  11. extra dry

    extra dry Happy to be here

  12. gentlegreen

    gentlegreen Sproutarian.

  13. gentlegreen

    gentlegreen Sproutarian.

    Mallow family - hibiscus, hollyhock etc ..

    It's the cheese-shaped bud formation - even clearer in the seed pod.

    mallowcheese.jpg

    Malvaceae: Mallow Family. Identify plants, flowers, shrubs, trees.

    The leaf form is pretty diverse - to the extent that idiot cops in the USA have been known to mistake one form of hibiscus for cannabis.

    hibiscus-cannabinus-300x300.jpg

    Mind you, in the UK I've heard of at least one instance of someone having their tomato plants confiscated - and that in a country area ...
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2017
    extra dry and Callie like this.
  14. extra dry

    extra dry Happy to be here

    Cheers G.Green. cousin will be happy.
     
  15. campanula

    campanula plant a seed

    hibiscus moscheutos - these have appeared over the last few years - previously, the only hardy hibiscus was the shrubby h.syriacus. I think 'Disco Belle' was one of the first cultivars (there are many now but the 'Disco' series still reign supreme. Surprisingly easy from seed.
    I am currently growing malvaviscus...or Turk's Cap - related to abutilon but a good doer in shade (unlike most of the malva tribe).
     
    May Kasahara and gentlegreen like this.
  16. Leafster

    Leafster Nurturing green fingers

    Any ideas what this might be? It grows flat to the ground and several of them have appeared over the winter on an area where I had some building work done. It's somewhere between 45cm and 60cm across. I'm on chalk, if that helps.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  17. gentlegreen

    gentlegreen Sproutarian.

    The flowers give it the look of a member of the carrot family - once umbelliferae, but now annoyingly "apiaceae " ...
     
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  18. ringo

    ringo Macaroni cheese controller

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  19. Leafster

    Leafster Nurturing green fingers

    Thanks! :) It's from a company called Hartman.
     
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  20. gentlegreen

    gentlegreen Sproutarian.

    The weird thing is the flower buds look a bit carroty, the foliage like parsley - perhaps even poppy / fumitory -like and the seed pods look like cleavers (sticky willy) - but the latter has no relatives with leaves like that.

    Galium_aparine_b.jpg
     
    Leafster likes this.
  21. kabbes

    kabbes "A top 400 poster"

    I apparently knew a lot more about shrubs in 2011 than I do now.
     
  22. Leafster

    Leafster Nurturing green fingers

    This is still puzzling me. I asked my neighbours who are keen gardeners and they couldn't identify it and nor had they seen it growing in their garden.

    I'm wondering if you're on to something with fumitory. The only trouble is the flowers on my specimen don't look right when you look at other fumitory photos.

    My neighbours were so intrigued they've potted one up to see how it grows and if the flowers develop any more. :D
     
    gentlegreen likes this.
  23. BoatieBird

    BoatieBird Well-Known Member

    You could always stick it on iSpot to see if anyone can identify it
    Home | iSpot
     
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  24. Leafster

    Leafster Nurturing green fingers

    Thanks! I'll check it out later.
     
  25. Artaxerxes

    Artaxerxes Well-Known Member

    If you get a picture of the flowers stick it on here so we can look it up :p
     
  26. campanula

    campanula plant a seed

    Coronopis didymus...or lepidium didymus, aka lesser swine cress. Does it have a pungent whiff? Cabbagey?
     
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  27. gentlegreen

    gentlegreen Sproutarian.

  28. gentlegreen

    gentlegreen Sproutarian.

    I did struggle to find a ground-hugging umbellifer ... I would hope a close-up of the flower petals would have given it away.
    Possibly good for haemmerhoids apparently - if not for salad.
     
  29. Leafster

    Leafster Nurturing green fingers

    Thank you, Thank You! You're right it does have a whiffiness about it! :D
     
    campanula likes this.
  30. Rutita1

    Rutita1 Scum with no integrity, apparently.

    These lovely evergreen plants were here when I moved in. I have never found out what they are but I did notice something lovely this year. They are the home of the many ladybirds that live in the garden. The leaf/flower forms make perfect little homes. :cool:
     

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