*What book are you reading? (part 2)

Discussion in 'books, films, TV, radio & writing' started by editor, Jun 13, 2008.

  1. Artaxerxes

    Artaxerxes Well-Known Member

    Hare with Amber Eyes - Edmund de Waal

    It's weird reading someone else's family history, especially from a perspective where they've clearly been middle or upper class for well over a century and can talk of houses in the French countryside to escape Paris.
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2017
  2. Voley

    Voley Knees Up Mother Earth

    Just started 'Don't You Leave Me Here,' Wilko Johnson's autobiography. Fantastic so far - he writes like he plays guitar. Fast, blunt, choppy, in yer face. Difficult to put down; great book.
     
    sojourner and Libertad like this.
  3. DotCommunist

    DotCommunist my world is fire and blood

    Gotham by Gaslight, an Elsewhere DC comic that imagines a turn of the 19th century gotham where Jack the Ripper pays a visit. Cracking art.
     
    krtek a houby likes this.
  4. krtek a houby

    krtek a houby Turnips - big! Swedes - small!

    Moby Dick; a helluva read but got bogged down in a chapter detailing various species of whales. I'm quite taken with the humour in it so far, although I imagine it gets very dramatic as it goes om.
    Botchan (Master Darling) - early 20th century novel by Soseki Natsume. A schoolteacher encounters odd folk out in the sticks.
     
    campanula likes this.
  5. Voley

    Voley Knees Up Mother Earth

    What Planet Am I On? by Shaun Ryder.

    In-depth analysis of the phenomenon of aliens/UFO's by the world's most accomplished space case. If it doesn't solve all the mysteries of the universe by chapter 3 I'll be most disappointed.
     
  6. sojourner

    sojourner Where's me readers?

    Went into Liverpool to put out flyers, and made the mistake of looking down whilst in News from Nowhere. £40 odd quid later...

    Anyway, I am currently reading this Review | Protest! Stories of Resistance, Ra Page (ed.) | Book of the Week - BookBlast® Diary and loving it.

    I also started the first book in the St Clare's series. Slight contrast! With distance, I can see now what I loved in them. There's stability, inclusion, and boundaries, and if you fuck up, authority figures treat you with fairness and kindness, not dire and unjust or cruel punishments. There's a camaraderie between the pupils too. This was the total opposite of my life as a child. I was worried I'd hate them, but I remember the stories soooo well, that it's actually been a proper wallowing experience :cool:

    There was a change of a word though, a word I especially remember because I had to look it up in the dictionary as a kid. 'Wont' has been replaced with 'way' :mad:
     
    campanula and BoatieBird like this.
  7. catinthehat

    catinthehat Failed VK = Replicant

    Im reading The Hearing Trumpet by Leononara Harrington alongside her biography. She was a surrealist artist and the Hearing Trumpet is described as a surrealist novel and was written in the 1960s. She is a fascinating artist and the book is really unusual, funny and she writes like she paints - you can discern her style iyswim. Thoroughly recommend either novel or biography or better still both.
     
  8. BoatieBird

    BoatieBird Well-Known Member

    There was a move a few years ago to update the language in Blyton's books, but it obviously didn't work as most of the changes have since been reversed
    Famous Five go back to original language after update flops
     
    sojourner likes this.
  9. Artaxerxes

    Artaxerxes Well-Known Member

    BoatieBird likes this.
  10. bookaddict

    bookaddict Member

    Hi again and a bit of news. The Belle Fields by Lora Adams above has now had the promised sequel published. I've been waiting for ages for answers to how certain characters turned out and the Ashes of Roses certainly does that and more. Got it in e.book form and read it in just a couple of 'sittings'. Glad one of the main characters got just what they deserved and surprised how some of the others got on? Fast moving and again well written with obvious loads of research - I can thoroughly recommend this one to you! Would suggest though that having a look at Belle Fields first and then Ashes of Roses has been more enjoyable for me but suppose with the prologue it's not essential? Would love to see anyone's comments on here who wants to give either a try? Good reading - now for a second look at Ashes!!:eek::)
     
  11. campanula

    campanula plant a seed

    Orfeo - Richard Powers - another one of his which references music (composing). Loved 'In the Time of Our Singing' and enjoying this one.
     
  12. DotCommunist

    DotCommunist my world is fire and blood

    James S. A. Corey, 'Leviathan Wakes'

    first book in the Expanse sequence. The prog was that good I had to give the books a go.
     
  13. sojourner

    sojourner Where's me readers?

    One Day In December: Celia Sanchez and the Cuban Revolution, by Nancy Stout

    Only 3 chapters in and gobsmacked already at her level of involvement and organisation. I had no idea it was her who scouted out the potential landing points for the Granma and recruited all the farmers :cool:
     
  14. ringo

    ringo Macaroni cheese controller

    The Blind Assassin - Margaret Atwood
    Quite slow, and its still not clear what purpose the sci-fi story serves, but the writing is so strong and interesting it doesn't matter at this point.
     
    MrSpikey and sojourner like this.
  15. Orang Utan

    Orang Utan Sub-Sub-Librarian

    Have you read Alias Grace? It's excellent
     
    MrSpikey and sojourner like this.
  16. ringo

    ringo Macaroni cheese controller

    No, I've only read a short story by her before but will definitely be reading more.
     
    Orang Utan likes this.
  17. sojourner

    sojourner Where's me readers?

    I can't think of anything she's written that I haven't enjoyed
     
    ringo likes this.
  18. Orang Utan

    Orang Utan Sub-Sub-Librarian

    alias grace has been adapted for tv - can't wait to see it
     
    sojourner likes this.
  19. sojourner

    sojourner Where's me readers?

    Ooo interesting. Is it gonna be on terrestrial then?
     
  20. Orang Utan

    Orang Utan Sub-Sub-Librarian

    Not sure what terrestrial means anymore, but it's going to be on Netflix
     
    sojourner likes this.
  21. sojourner

    sojourner Where's me readers?

    1,2,3 or 4 is what I mean by it.

    Anyway, I have Netflix so that's good.
     
    Orang Utan likes this.
  22. D'wards

    D'wards I'm an excellent driver

    Just finished Disgrace by J.M. Coetzee. Fantastic. It's pretty short and easy to read, but is so thought provoking and carries some pretty heavy themes including aging, and the difficulties of being a liberal in modern day S.A.
     
    ringo, sojourner and Orang Utan like this.
  23. David Clapson

    David Clapson Well-Known Member

    They offered me £30 off and I couldn't resist...it's such a beautiful thing to own, and I'm getting a better understanding of the language with the huge pages and the illustrations...it's mesmeric. Already one of my favourite possessions. Hard to describe the bond I feel with it.
     
  24. D'wards

    D'wards I'm an excellent driver

    Read 16% of Master and Commander. Abandoned. Was awfully boring with too much maritime jargon
     
  25. ringo

    ringo Macaroni cheese controller

    That was great :thumbs:
     
  26. sojourner

    sojourner Where's me readers?

    Still reading the Celia Sanchez book and the Protest one, and the Enid Blyton ones, and now also reading Travels Into Bokhara by Alexander Burnes. If I just read one book at a time I might finish the fucking things faster :rolleyes:
     
  27. krtek a houby

    krtek a houby Turnips - big! Swedes - small!

    Still on Moby Dick and finsished The Devil in the White City by Eril Larson. Nothing to do with W12; it tells the true story of the 1893 World Fair about the architects who managed to build it and a serial killer on the loose. Would make a decent film, I reckons.
    Now reading John Man's Samurai - the Last Warrior. Accessible look at Saigo's deeds and the end of the samurai.
     
  28. weltweit

    weltweit Well-Known Member

    You get used to the maritime jargon if you stick to them.

    I am now on The Thirteen Gun Salute, Patrick O'Brian. Which is the 13th of the series. I find them nicely paced bed time reading, just before I drift off.
     
    D'wards likes this.
  29. flypanam

    flypanam “There is no reason for restraint”

    Ismail Kadare - The palace of dreams.

    Slowly making my way through all his works. Great writing and great stories.
     
  30. krtek a houby

    krtek a houby Turnips - big! Swedes - small!

    Mark Kurlansky's Non-Violence - The History of a Dangerous Idea.

    Got this years back from a mate, started it. Left it. Back in it. Very accessible; more now than the first time I tried it.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice