Total lunar eclipse (Mon 21 Jan 2019)

Discussion in 'science, nature and environment' started by 2hats, Jan 16, 2019.

  1. 2hats

    2hats

    There’s a total lunar eclipse on Monday morning (21 Jan) just before sunrise (greatest eclipse is 0512 UTC). It is visible from all of the UK and computer models currently indicate a good chance of broken cloud/clear sky for viewing.

    Timings (UTC):
    Penumbral Begins P1 02:36:30
    Partial Begins U1 03:33:54
    Total Begins U2 04:41:17
    Greatest Eclipse GE 05:12:16
    Total Ends U3 05:43:16
    Partial Ends U4 06:50:39
    Penumbral Ends P4 07:48:00

    LE2019-01-21T.png
     
    Nigel, Libertad, Maggot and 11 others like this.
  2. weltweit

    weltweit Well-Known Member

    Interesting.

    But it is the earth that gets between the moon and the sun no?
     
    SpookyFrank likes this.
  3. wiskey

    wiskey Albatross Admirer

    I didn't really know where to post this so I'll stick it here even though its not really relevant ...

    ... I saw a meteor the other night ! Seriously one of the coolest things I've ever experienced :cool: a very bright flash of light and then a giant trail across the sky slowly fading.

    What's even better is that lots of other people saw it too so I didn't imagine it :D

     
  4. wiskey

    wiskey Albatross Admirer

    Yes

     
  5. NoXion

    NoXion Keep an eye out for diamonds

    Looks like it's going to be cloudy around my ends tonight! :mad:
     
  6. StoneRoad

    StoneRoad heckling from the back!

    I wonder if I'll be staying up late enough or getting up early to see any of this.
     
  7. planetgeli

    planetgeli There's no future in England's dreaming

    I sleep bad, I can do 5.10am no problem.

    Total cloud cover a certainty of course.
     
  8. a_chap

    a_chap Much research has shown I am just fucking stupid

    Good job that the eclipse is on Monday then.
     
    NoXion likes this.
  9. NoXion

    NoXion Keep an eye out for diamonds

    Oh. Derp.
     
    a_chap likes this.
  10. Maggot

    Maggot The Cake of Liberty

    Bump.

    Cos it's tonight (tomorrow morning, technically).
     
    clicker likes this.
  11. a_chap

    a_chap Much research has shown I am just fucking stupid

    Oh, bugger :(

    upload_2019-1-20_17-50-11.png
     
    farmerbarleymow likes this.
  12. planetgeli

    planetgeli There's no future in England's dreaming

    Forecast for where I am is unbelievably good. This is actually going to happen for a change.
     
    farmerbarleymow likes this.
  13. wiskey

    wiskey Albatross Admirer

    Well it's currently cloudy :mad:
     
    farmerbarleymow likes this.
  14. farmerbarleymow

    farmerbarleymow Seagull + Chips = Happy Seagull

    Same here - no chance of seeing the Moon this morning.
     
  15. wiskey

    wiskey Albatross Admirer

    I was impressed by how bright it was earlier, this was about 10pm IMG_20190120_203018.jpg
     
    Nigel and cupid_stunt like this.
  16. farmerbarleymow

    farmerbarleymow Seagull + Chips = Happy Seagull

    Police helicopter out on patrol?
     
  17. farmerbarleymow

    farmerbarleymow Seagull + Chips = Happy Seagull

    Those of us under a blanket of cloud can watch it vicariously here.

     
    Nigel likes this.
  18. NoXion

    NoXion Keep an eye out for diamonds

    Popped out quickly to have a look. Got a good look at it despite some clouds. If they stay clear then I may go out again for a longer look.
     
  19. Miss-Shelf

    Miss-Shelf I've looked at life from both sides now

    I can see it clearly in Liverpool:thumbs:
     
    blairsh likes this.
  20. etnea

    etnea EXTERMINIEREN

    Watching it in Hamilton, Ontario :)
     
  21. wiskey

    wiskey Albatross Admirer

    Still cloudy :rolleyes:
     
    farmerbarleymow likes this.
  22. farmerbarleymow

    farmerbarleymow Seagull + Chips = Happy Seagull

    At least there will be another one at some point. These are the next ones due in the UK.

    16/17 July 2019 – Partial lunar eclipse

    10 January 2020 – Penumbral lunar eclipse

    5 June 2020 – Penumbral lunar eclipse

    You can find the next eclipses in a specific location here.
     
    planetgeli and wiskey like this.
  23. smmudge

    smmudge Sissy that walk!

    Brr it's cold outside!

    IMG_20190121_051752.jpg
     
    clicker, chainsawjob, a_chap and 4 others like this.
  24. 2hats

    2hats

    Half awake phone camera photos taken from the Alps...
    20190121_060943.jpg 20190121_061006.jpg
     
    clicker, Ponyutd, planetgeli and 8 others like this.
  25. cupid_stunt

    cupid_stunt Dyslexic King Cnut ... the Great.

    I only found out about it, when it was mentioned on the news just after 6 am, and I could have seen it, as we have a perfectly clear sky.

    So I missed the main event, just caught the last part of it.
     
    farmerbarleymow likes this.
  26. planetgeli

    planetgeli There's no future in England's dreaming

    We had cloud. :facepalm: :(
     
  27. 2hats

    2hats

    It looks like there may have been a meteor impact on the Moon witnessed during the eclipse.

    e2a: the small white dot towards the upper left limb of the Moon (0930hrs position) here:
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2019
  28. Mumbles274

    Mumbles274 running from law and the press and the parents

    That's pretty cool
     
  29. 2hats

    2hats

    An update on the impact - analysis of a wide range of imagery collected during the event suggests that the (0.3 second) flash of light observed on the Moon was produced when a meteoroid about the size of a beach ball (30-50cm) with mass of 20-100kg crashed into the surface of at a speed of around 14 km/s. The impact, equivalent to 0.9-1.8 tonnes of TNT, produced a cloud of hot, bright material that expanded rapidly and disappeared in less than a third of a second. If the estimates are correct, there should be a crater some 7-15m across where the impact took place which could be observed by a future lunar probe.
    [​IMG]
    Paper: arXiv:1901.09573
     
    Signal 11 likes this.

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