To quit or not to quit

Discussion in 'education & employment' started by miss direct, Aug 8, 2018.

  1. miss direct

    miss direct misfungled

    I am rather miserable in my job, thanks to a workaholic boss (who emails at weekends, in the middle of the night, while I'm on leave), lots of travel (rarely to anywhere interesting) and far more sales and test writing than training/creative opportunities (the only bits of the job I'm interested in).

    If I were in the UK/EU, I would have no hesitations about quitting. I have some other bits of work lined up, which, although it's freelance, pays a lot better. I've also applied for a few freelance jobs although will have to wait to see whether I've had any luck with those. I need to quit by the first week of September to be able to start the first freelance course.

    However, I live in Turkey and the government here is making it increasingly difficult for foreigners to stay here. The hoops they make you jump through now in order to get a residence permit are expensive, stressful, pointless and extremely time consuming. There's also the chance of being rejected.

    I just don't know what to do. I want to quit...I could get a tourist visa and have 3 months on that to sort out what I'm going to do. But I currently have a work permit (attached to this job - not transferable), a monthly salary and free state health care. If I quit, I lose all of that. I'm not feeling particularly stable or strong at the moment so am not sure if I'm in a good place to make decisions.
     
  2. Celyn

    Celyn Well-Known Member

    Unless there's any reason to suppose it's going to get better, quit. Scary, but you'll live somehow.
     
    miss direct likes this.
  3. FridgeMagnet

    FridgeMagnet Administrator

    I had a secure but dead end job in the States with work visa ages ago which I quit and returned to the U.K. without any clear idea of what I was going to do. I regret many things from that period but not quitting. Just the feeling that you’re tied to a job by law and if you quit you’re out of the country is itself miserable - I felt like an indentured servant.
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2018
  4. Celyn

    Celyn Well-Known Member

    I quit a proper job in London, with the excuse of buggering off to do a Master's. Never did finish it - had done all the course stuff but never did complete thesis 'cos got job instead. Job was sneaky because, classed as temporary, it paid me a few thousand less than it ought to have if 'cos it was classed as temp and they never bothered with their internal trawl prior to recruiting for it as permanent post because why would they, when they had a cut-price Celyn? Resented that a bit, but much much happier in Wales than in London. Also, job not evil like the London one was.

    (I gave in my notice much earlier than I had intended to, but it was a great feeling after an annoying commute just to say "sod it" and give notice. Hah!
     
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  5. Grump

    Grump Well-Known Member

    I think you have answered your own question if you read the post carefully. Quit, use 3 month visa to get something better, health care only useful if you stay in the job and allow it to make you so Ill you need to use it. I have quit a couple of jobs that I hated and had me laying in bed at 4am fretting about work issues, I don't regret doing that and something else always turns up.
     
  6. miss direct

    miss direct misfungled

    Thank you. You're all telling me what I already know. Just needed some confirmation.
     
  7. Grump

    Grump Well-Known Member

    And, as I imagine you are a valuable employee, there is a chance that offering your notice will cause your boss to offer you better terms. Then it's down to you as to whether you trust them
     
  8. Celyn

    Celyn Well-Known Member

    Heh. Before hitting "send", I worried I was being all sorts of wrong, but figured others would give their views soon.

    So, it was really one of those things like seeking advice or tossing a coin actually to find out what your own already-made-but-not-quite choice is? :)

    Wishing you all the best and I'm sure it will work out well. :) What Grump said
    definitely sounds familiar. Horribly familiar.
     
    equationgirl and miss direct like this.
  9. Mrs Miggins

    Mrs Miggins Dirty little feet

    miss direct I really feel for you. I miss New Zealand dreadfully but I don't miss having to worry about visas all the time and whether I will be granted another after spending hundreds of dollars on the process. I also don't miss the thing that was making my life miserable which for me was my relationship rather than my job. If we had been in England, the relationship would not have lasted anything like as long which sounds very similar to how you feel about your job. I accepted a toxic situation so that I could stay.

    I knew plenty of people in NZ as well who were stuck in a town they didn't want to be in and in a job they hated because of the conditions of their visas. They were often taken advantage of as their employers knew damn well they couldn't leave and stay in the country.

    It is a very difficult decision to make to have to give up and come home. I wrestled with it for a long time but I made the right decision for me in the end.

    I send you strength xxx
     
  10. miss direct

    miss direct misfungled

    I would love it if they realised that I am valuable to the company and offered me more money. Because of the Turkish lira crashing, my salary is now £500 per month less than it was when I started 18 months ago, despite a pay rise after a year. That would demotivate anyone, wouldn't it?
     
  11. Pickman's model

    Pickman's model Every man and every woman is a star

    Do a runner
     
    kebabking and Badgers like this.
  12. miss direct

    miss direct misfungled

    A runner? Like go without telling anyone? No way! Don't want to burn my bridges.
     
  13. Rutita1

    Rutita1 Scum with no integrity, apparently.

    It's the miserable part of this that is my concern. Even if your current job means you have all of those things that you fear losing you are miserable. Life is too short for being unhappy at work and sometimes we need to take risks for things to get better for us even if they are calculated ones.
     
  14. miss direct

    miss direct misfungled

    Yes. This job really is making me unhappy. I have to work with a lot of salesmen, and the day's programme is dependent on them. A few of them are cool, and we get on, but most of them are older men just concerned with making a sale, we have nothing in common and I dislike spending the day (or several days, sometimes) with them. There's also lots of brown-nosing and time wasting drinking endless cups of tea with managers and shaking hands and sitting around. Hate all that too. There's never any banter or fun.

    I get given work at the last minute, overnight jobs, jobs requiring a 3am wake up to go to the airport, jobs on a Saturday. So I can rarely make plans or have much of a social life. Oh, and corporate events. I made a post earlier this year about a four day event at a 5 star all inclusive hotel. I appreciate that many people would love to take part in such a thing but I am not one of those people.

    1 year and 9 months is long enough, isn't it? It doesn't look bad on my CV?
     
    Thimble Queen and Celyn like this.
  15. Celyn

    Celyn Well-Known Member

    "I get given work at the last minute, overnight jobs, jobs requiring a 3am wake up to go to the airport, jobs on a Saturday."

    Sounds as though you are being exploited here. Are there other people in posts the same as yours and, if so, are they treated the same way? Come to think of it, even if they are, it's still not good, and it's clearly making you very unhappy (with damn good reason).

    A year and nine months seems fine. "Moving on to other opportunities", sort of thing. plus, your job seems not really to be the one that you agreed to do, so it's fair enough to leave it. (Celyn says tentatively)
     
  16. miss direct

    miss direct misfungled

    I feel really quite good now I've made the decision. I don't know how much notice I am supposed to give, but I'll give just under a month. I'll hand my notice in as soon as I get paid in September (supposed to be the 1st of the month, this month it was the 8th :mad:), work September and then leave. I made a list yesterday with positives and negatives of leaving and the positives list was three times longer. All the stressful, last minute things that go against my personality type will be over.
     
    Maggot, Celyn, Badgers and 5 others like this.
  17. miss direct

    miss direct misfungled

    There are three others with the same job as mine, but they're all much newer than I so still find it exciting. One is a single Mum so is rarely given over nighters (fair enough).
     
  18. Glad you are feeling strong enough to quit. It sounds like the right thing to do. Best of luck xx
     
    Badgers, Celyn and miss direct like this.
  19. Riklet

    Riklet procrastinación

    Def get another job sorted first before quitting even if part time.

    If youre planning on staying in Turkey you will easily be able to with your skills and experience.
     
    miss direct likes this.
  20. Teaboy

    Teaboy It definitely looks brighter over there..

    I once quit a job with nothing else lined up, I wouldn't recommend it.
     
    miss direct likes this.
  21. Riklet

    Riklet procrastinación

    Oh and Ive just quit my job and moved back to the UK recently with the aim of doing some digital materials stuff maybe. But it's going to be hard and take time, especially not being super qualified on paper.

    Would you leave Turkey if the right job comes up or are you there for the medium-long haul?
     
    miss direct likes this.
  22. miss direct

    miss direct misfungled

    I can't see myself moving back to the UK. I'd only want to live by myself in a decent place and I would have to start from complete scratch again. I imagine myself settling here in Turkey but working online/doing bits of freelance work. Everything just seems so difficult.
     
    Mrs Miggins likes this.
  23. Supine

    Supine Rough Like Badger

    I did too and it was the best decision I've ever made :D
     
  24. maomao

    maomao 四月她爹

    I've walked from jobs with nothing to go to three times (including a similar situation when I left China), have never regretted it and always ended up better off financially and generally. Was a lot easier before mortgage and kids (though last time I did have a mortgage and a pregnant wife) it is a bit scary.
     
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  25. Grump

    Grump Well-Known Member

    Hope it all works out for you and sure it will.
     
    miss direct likes this.
  26. Mr Smin

    Mr Smin Registered Luser

    Try to understand things from the points of view of the Turkish government and of your employer. I'm not saying agree with them, just know their motivations.

    You described changes to the visa system as pointless. To me they look like a signal: Turkish government wants fewer foreign workers, or maybe just wants to appear to be strict with foreigners to appease the home audience.

    The falling value of the currency: If I'm your boss and I think you'll keep working despite the effective pay cut then there's little chance I'll give you a raise unless you are so vital to the business that I can't even take a small risk that you'll quit.
     

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