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"This iPhone-only professional photographer is the future of sports photography"

Discussion in 'photography, graphics & art' started by editor, May 23, 2016.

  1. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    It's really not, you know. I'd love to see how this guy would manage snapping action shots in a low light football ground. Sure the iPhone (and loads of other phones) can take perfectly good shots in good light. It would be hard to tell the difference between a phone and a dSLR shot if it was taken in ideal conditions and published in a relatively small size.

    But like fuck are squinty little cameras with tiny sensors and barely any depth of field, awfulhandling and no physical controls going to be "the future of sports photography." Or at least not until lens/sensor technology massively improves.

    66.jpg

    This iPhone-only professional photographer is the future of sports photography
     
    UnderAnOpenSky likes this.
  2. Kanda

    Kanda Diving wanker

    Clickbait
     
  3. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    Thing is, that picture above is fucking awful. Totally over saturated.

    And if it is clickbait at least we're having the discussion here, but the guy does indeed only shoot with an iPhone now (or so he claims)
     
    Greebo likes this.
  4. Saul Goodman

    Saul Goodman It's all good, man

    That's a piss poor photo.
     
    Greebo, Virtual Blue and editor like this.
  5. Kanda

    Kanda Diving wanker

    It's a ridiculous notion, 'the future of sports photography', as you have said, bollocks. The article also say 'know your limitations'.

    So it's a bullshit article.

    Yes, workflow options exist for handheld devices. So fucking what, it's not sports photography is it? :)
     
    Greebo likes this.
  6. alsoknownas

    alsoknownas some bloke

    I've been starting to think that an iPhone would be a good item for me to carry around for video work. Why? - Versatility.

    I could use it as an emergency backup for my A camera, and as an occasional B camera if I wanted to pack super light. There are lots of lens adaptors and grip equipment available to make it a viable handy little stand-by unit.

    There are also very decent sound add-ons that would make it a great back-up sound recorder.

    There are also lots of apps that could potentially be useful (lighting charts, clapper board apps, etc.).

    It would be great if Android caught up in this regard, but it seems as though the industry is very iPhone-orientated for the time being.

    It's not a *serious* consideration at the moment (too many other needs), but I would honestly consider getting a unit - not as a phone - but as a peice of gear for a pro environment.

    Of course that doesn't mean that 'iphone is the future of sports blah...'.
     
  7. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    I quite like working with camera limitations - I often shoot football games with a fixed lens, wide angle camera and I think it can bring about some decent shots and also make you rethink your photography and maybe grab shots you otherwise wouldn't (especially as most sports photography involves zoom/telephoto lens) . But if this guy is touting for sports photography work, I don't think he'll find many people wanting to hire him and his iPhone.
     
    Greebo and Virtual Blue like this.
  8. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    Once you start bolting on the add ons you may as well take a decent compact camera instead. Something like a Ricoh GR absolutely destroys the iPhone.
     
    Greebo and UnderAnOpenSky like this.
  9. weltweit

    weltweit Well-Known Member

    editor you mean "lots of depth of field", shallow dof is what iPhone cameras can't manage.
     
  10. alsoknownas

    alsoknownas some bloke

    Not for video.
     
  11. FridgeMagnet

    FridgeMagnet Administrator

    Well, if you're going to do journalistic/crowd photography at sporting events—which I find more interesting than trad sports photography due to not being interested in sports—sure, use your phone, use whatever you like tbh (this guy shot a big bag of expired film at the Daytona 500). It's true that phones don't make people as suspicious and you can get more candid shots, though a small unthreatening compact also has this benefit to an extent and gives you better quality. But it's not actually photography of sports, is it?

    File under "if it didn't have such a clickbait TechCrunch headline it might be reasonable".
     
  12. FridgeMagnet

    FridgeMagnet Administrator

    Quality on the GR is way better than any phone shrly. Doesn't have any apps of course.
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2016
  13. alsoknownas

    alsoknownas some bloke

    The footage I've seen online from the Ricoh GR has been mediocre at best. Reviews suggest it's video capability is lacklustre. No manual exposure controls? :eek: Forget about it.

    On the other hand, people are pulling remarkable footage out of the latest iPhones, usually via software tweaks to overide the exposure controls. Also - 4K for 1080p delivery = awesome.
     
  14. alsoknownas

    alsoknownas some bloke

    I do think the iPhone is becoming a 'no joke' piece of pro kit in some ways. This is the Mavis interface (£12):

    [​IMG]

    I spy - focus peaking, full waveform, vectorscope, and a decent-looking audio monitor. Not bad. Half the expensive cameras I've had to use haven't been as fully featured!

    Though obviously the fact that you are filming on a sensor the size of half a tic tac will become evident at some point.
     
  15. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    And you can throw the phone away in low light when that sensor + tiny lens = grainy bag o'shite footage.
     
    Pickman's model likes this.
  16. alsoknownas

    alsoknownas some bloke

    Yeah. But then every camera has it's pluses and minuses.

    No offence - but I wouldn't be able to use the footage from the Ricoh at all for what I do, low light or otherwise (though it does look like a great stills camera).

    I think the point about the iPhone is that it would be a great thing to have in my bag. I could see it's versatility saving my arse on a number of occasions.
     
  17. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    If video is your thing, there's plenty of more versatile and higher quality small compact cameras around.
     
  18. alsoknownas

    alsoknownas some bloke

    Not that can double as a pro sound recorder, and run workflow apps, and have scopes, etc.

    Also - are there though? Most compacts I've toyed with fall down on the video side quite badly.
     
  19. Chilli.s

    Chilli.s Well-Known Member

    Id prefer a phone app tacked onto a Ricoh GR any day. By the time a phone is turned on, had the password, put on me glasses to see where the app is on the pissy little screen, pointed and shot, the picture is probably long gone.
     
    Pickman's model and editor like this.
  20. alsoknownas

    alsoknownas some bloke

    Yes, but that's half the point. The phone can actually run apps whereas the compact cannot. Versatility.
     
  21. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    Oh come on: you can just use the wi-fi on the camera to transfer images to get all the versatility you need plus the bonus of far better quality images/footage.
     
    Pickman's model likes this.
  22. alsoknownas

    alsoknownas some bloke

    I'm talking about stuff you can actually use in the field, like scopes (oh good, now I can vaguely match the footage from my A cam), like sound recording (great - I can chuck that over there and record close-up sound), a sync slate, a remote monitor for my A cam..., etc.

    The iPhone isn't the best thing at doing any of those things, but it's the only thing I know of that can do all of them (and a lot more, obv.) at a high enough standard for pro (non-broadcast) work.
     
    beesonthewhatnow likes this.
  23. Chilli.s

    Chilli.s Well-Known Member

    Eventually its all about what you're used to and get on with. I like a camera with a big sensor and large lens caching lots of light, that can be taking pictures in moments, out of the pocket and bang bang bang. And i like a big screen for editing so its a computer for that. Its nice to have a phone camera but I only use it for "notes" as such or if i've not got a real camera with me. I cant deny that good pics can be taken on a phone though. I wouldn't even consider editing on a phone, screen would drive me nuts.
     
    Pickman's model and editor like this.
  24. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    My phone is supposed to have a particularly 'fast' camera but it will still miss a ton of shots that I can easily grab with my nippy Ricoh. And without any physical controls, trying to change modes on a phone is a real ballache if you're in a hurry.
     
    Pickman's model and Chilli.s like this.
  25. alsoknownas

    alsoknownas some bloke

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