The gardening thread

Discussion in 'suburban75' started by ringo, Feb 11, 2014.

  1. The39thStep

    The39thStep Well-Known Member

    There's an old saying about planting potatoes when the first dandelions or daffodils flower.
     
    gentlegreen likes this.
  2. OzT

    OzT Online early mornings when at work ....

    Too late, was such a lovely day yesterday I took them out the greenhouse. Also planted hollyhocks and foxglove babies that were in the greenhouse.

    Weather forecast is rain for the next 7 days or so, think will give them a chance to bed in get strong as it wil lalso be quite a bit above freezinge.

    I have no patience really, been waiting since winter's start to get the garden going again! also planted a few new ground cover, so if all goes well and no more frost, I amy be stealing a marh and have an earlier flowering garden this year, fingers crossed!! :)
     
  3. gentlegreen

    gentlegreen sproutarian

    Have you chitted the spuds ?

    Seems rather early - and the carrot seed is likely to just sit there ... have you ever tried fluid drilling ?
     
  4. Idaho

    Idaho blah blah blah

    I need to buy the seed potatoes! They are usually pretty well chitted by the time you buy them. Never had any problems growing spuds.

    Carrots, however... They are always a pain in the arse. Sometimes they grow, sometimes they don't.
     
  5. ringo

    ringo Macaroni cheese controller

    New series of Gardners' World starts tonight. BBC2 8:30pm
     
  6. Leafster

    Leafster From the FRow

    This morning has been the first opportunity I've had to properly take stock of how the garden's coped with the winter.

    A handful of plants look as though they might not have survived but some of these are borderline hardy here so I shouldn't expect miracles especially when we've had a few nights down to as low as -8°C. There's a few that look a bit sickly; verbena bonariensis, hebe, artichoke, dianthus and euphorbia but I reckon that's just a combination of the wind, rain and frost damage. I'm sure they'll pull through. Some of the skimmias don't look too good either but I'm sure that's down to me pushing my luck on my very alkaline soil. :rolleyes: I'll try a top dressing of ericaceous compost. The rhurbarb looks a bit sad after the recent snow. Last year I set fire to the remains of the old shed too close to it and seriously wilted all the new growth but it coped with that so I'm sure a little snow won't bother it for too long.

    The water feature needs dredging - too many leaves in it! The lawn has taken a battering from all the badgers,foxes and probably squirrels digging holes in it so that needs some serious attention. The squirrels have also been digging up the tulips! :mad:

    Oh, and the weeds! They are everywhere!
     
  7. Callie

    Callie Pivoting

    and so it begins :D
     
    BoatieBird, Calamity1971 and Leafster like this.
  8. StoneRoad

    StoneRoad heckling from the back!

    I love tulips, but my place is far too windy most years. I might try again, once I get new sheds and greenhouses sorted out. Previously I just didn't have the time / facilities to lift & store the bulbs - Oh, and squirrels / other rodents eating them.
     
  9. Idaho

    Idaho blah blah blah

    Got the carrots in and found a couple of mini poly tunnel things in the back of the shed I must have bought years ago. I reckon they should start well under there.

    Got the onions and garlic in too, and the broad beans and mange tout peas. I put organic matter over the winter and cover the beds with horticultural paper. It's a way of paying £50 to save a few days worth of weeding the following season. Took me less than 2 hours to rake to a nice crumb and get those 4 beds all done.

    IMG_20180310_162348.jpg
     
  10. campanula

    campanula plant a seed

    You could consider planting species tulips. Although smaller and daintier than the huge garden hybrids (I plant both), they are generally far more reliably perennial, ideal for pot culture (and can live in the same pot for years) and seem to be completely virus free. The best of the bunch are the batalini and chrysantha although I grow numerous other types as well. Seeing as you have great drainage, I really think you should investigate some of these gorgeous little bulbs - the most beautiful, and also the latest to bloom, are tulipa sprengeri...but Skipton Bulbs sell a fine selection including the wonderfully named t.Vvedenskyi.

    I might avoid the very tall single lates and also the lily-flowered if wind is likely to be an issue.
     
    wayward bob and StoneRoad like this.
  11. gentlegreen

    gentlegreen sproutarian

  12. campanula

    campanula plant a seed

    Sowed tomato seeds today. This is one of my seasonal jobs which I always do on the same date every year - kickstarts the main spring sowing schedule and marks the transition from my home garden (which is ready for the rest of the year) over to the allotment (where I am doing furious catch-up work). New to me, this year - a Sungold substitute - Orange Paruche, and Large Cherry, a cherry tomato which does not grow in bunches but each truss has a neat paired fruit set-up. Also, Quadro (for sauce), Bloody Butcher, Rose de Berne and Cavendish (old style OP seeds) and blight beaters - Stupice and Matina - early potato-leaved types.
     
  13. The39thStep

    The39thStep Well-Known Member

    I found out that one if the old boys in on if the local bars is a grafter ie he grafts trees and plants on to woodstock. I have seen in fields grafted stock protected by plastic bottles full of sand and apparantly it's a common way of grafting here. I had to get someone to translate for me but in May he's going to graft orange onto a pomegranate for me . Apparantly you get something very similar to a sweet blood orange . He's also going to do a graft of two different types of fig trees so you get a crop in August and another in late September. He also reckons he can graft potato to tomato .
     
    BoatieBird likes this.
  14. gentlegreen

    gentlegreen sproutarian

    :D:D
     
  15. gentlegreen

    gentlegreen sproutarian

    scifisam and The39thStep like this.
  16. Idaho

    Idaho blah blah blah

    Grafting an annual... One prone to blight... That's pretty easy to grow independently.. gimmick.
     
    gentlegreen and campanula like this.
  17. The39thStep

    The39thStep Well-Known Member

    The two things I have noticed over here in Portugal is that there is less blight and hardly any carrot fly. Cabbage whites April - June and snails this time of year are a different matter.
     
  18. campanula

    campanula plant a seed

    There is no reason to graft tomatoes (onto tomatoes, spuds or anything else) in this country. It does have its uses when the soil nematodes are both plentiful and destructive - Florida is a particular case - but in UK soil, it is a money-making gimmick.
    Never heard of grafting citrus to pomegranate...but I did graft my Meyer lemon onto a poncirus trifoliata rootstock (which was easily raised from seed) while at hort school). My tutor had grown a 'family tree' with 17 or so different apples, all grown from side grafts in the cambium...but it was not exactly a succcessful outcome (looked awful with numerous growth patterns and stronger varieties overwhelming weaker ones...but as an experiment, Island of Dr Moreau stylee...?)
     
  19. gentlegreen

    gentlegreen sproutarian

    At least poncirus is in the same genus - whereas pomegranate is miles away.

    There's a classic myth about grafting hops to cannabis rootstock to produce beer with THC.
    I believe they did actually do the experiment - but for other reasons.
     
  20. campanula

    campanula plant a seed

    Colour me sceptical. Generally, compatibility between species is a requirement while grafting 2 completely different genus types together seems...counter-intuitive. While any branch can be grafted onto any tree (with very variable results), the resulting fruit (and long-term success of the graft union) may be...problematic.

    Possibly something lost in translation?
     
  21. The39thStep

    The39thStep Well-Known Member

    Well we'll have to wait and see.
     
  22. Idaho

    Idaho blah blah blah

    Hops and cannabis are related. But the cannabis oil is not created in the rootstock and pumped to the plant extremities, but created in the buds. So grafting could work, but wouldn't create any drug effect.
     
  23. gentlegreen

    gentlegreen sproutarian

    The daftest thing was the way they used to assay any cannabinoids :-

     
  24. StoneRoad

    StoneRoad heckling from the back!

    Damm snow again - now starting to worry about the aftereffects !
    Birds seem to be OK, especially as we're putting out a lot of food for them.
    It has certainly put some of my plans back by a couple of weeks.
    If the current lot thaws 'quickly' I think there will be a lot of mud in an area due for re-seeding (with grass and possibly some wildflowers).
    Maybe I'll do some more tree / hedge pruning instead next week.
     
  25. Leafster

    Leafster From the FRow

    Same here. The daffs took a battering in the last snow and a second hit with the recent stuff (which is still falling, as I type).

    I wanted to get out and start making repairs to the lawn but it's a been a bit difficult when you can't even see the grass!

    This weekend all I've managed to do is plant some Canna and Zantedeschia (for the first time) but they're in pots on the kitchen windowsill.
     
  26. campanula

    campanula plant a seed

    I seriously await the results with interest, 39steps. Plant breeders have always pushed the envelope a bit - Luther Burbank and the Lubera family come to mind. Life is astonishingly tenacious and adaptable.
     
    The39thStep likes this.
  27. gentlegreen

    gentlegreen sproutarian

    Aldi had more for my front garden today - pink astilbes and pink dicentras to add to my pink filipendula (assuming it survived the winter) and pink eupatorium - following on from pink hyacinths and pink wallflowers and with pink brugmansia and pink stargazey lilies ..

    It's all getting a bit out of hand :D
     
    clicker likes this.
  28. campanula

    campanula plant a seed

    You need a lavatera...or better yet, anisodontea 'El Royo'. Fairly sure I could oblige in a month or so.
    And some penstemon.

    I love pink in the garden. And orange.
     
    gentlegreen likes this.
  29. gentlegreen

    gentlegreen sproutarian

    Which reminds me I need to sow my double pink hollyhock seeds :D

    Those others will have to go on my list for France :)
     
  30. mrsfran

    mrsfran Slightly less bulbous

    This year's plan :)

    [​IMG]
     
    BoatieBird, ringo, Idaho and 5 others like this.

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