The gardening thread

Discussion in 'suburban75' started by ringo, Feb 11, 2014.

  1. wayward bob

    wayward bob i ate all your bees

    trees all planted \o/ they've gone straight into a raised bed for the moment, i've done nothing with them root-wise as i figured i'd find out if they actually survive first... i'm not sure about the pine cos i've read they don't like being bare-rooted and i managed to break one of the roots on the hornbeam :facepalm: but otherwise fingers crossed.

    did some final clearing out of the massive vine-thing that's taken over my little lilac so hopefully that'll be able to spring back in the middle where it has a big hole atm :D

    tomorrow i'll do the final prune of the apple tree which is taking off the end of a long branch but it's a touch too high for me to do alone so will rope in mr b. i've already taken off the bits that poke you in the eye and the nasty-looking knobbly bits :thumbs:
     
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  2. wayward bob

    wayward bob i ate all your bees

    i have orange blossom :) my favourite smell in the world :cool:
     
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  3. wayward bob

    wayward bob i ate all your bees

    official garden geek - i was *so* excited when these turned up :oops::D

    [​IMG]
     
  4. campanula

    campanula plant a seed

    Say it ain't so, WaywardBob...at least if you mean the 'nasty looking knobbly bits' which grow off 2 year old wood (fruiting spurs) and not gnarly, lichen infested 'knobbly bits' of calloused over pruning cuts which failed to amount to much.
    I had a little inward gasp, recalling the 'non-flowering' hydrangea I mangled over several successive springs...along with various ramblers, which also fell victim to my brutal loppers. Although the worst case scenario is a only year of less fruit/flowers, as I found after a slack, non-pruning year.
     
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  5. gentlegreen

    gentlegreen "grade A liberal mug"

    I've just discovered that vitamin C can usefully help disperse excess chlorine in plant watering water - only in tiny amounts though ..
    I never worried before since chlorine is an essential plant nutrient ...

     
  6. wayward bob

    wayward bob i ate all your bees

    cankerous knobbly bits :oops: it really has been badly neglected, i never even knew they were there before. i constantly wonder that it's still alive, it's never exactly been a looker :D
     
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  7. wayward bob

    wayward bob i ate all your bees

    i have copper spray that i thought it might be worth going over with, it's scabby too :eek:
     
  8. campanula

    campanula plant a seed

    Phew! I have had a bloody and murderous gardening career...so I tend to think the worst. especially stuff I have done (often) myself.

    Old apple trees are a wonder though. Even dead ones have an innate charm. I would never fell one...although would be tempted to hang a rambler or something off one. They really do have an architectural loveliness in a sort of gothic style. I have a row of 20 year old cordons which have long departed from their original trellised neatness They have kept the original 45degree angle of lean, but now look wayward and drunken, interlocking branches to support each other (the guide wires and training frames have long gone).
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2018
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  9. freethinker

    freethinker Mindful

    When I saw a rainbow rose (online) I didn't think it could be real....until I saw one in real life! The base of the stem is split and placed in several different dyes....kinda cruel admittedly.
    [​IMG]
     
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  10. scifisam

    scifisam feck! arse! girls! drink!

    Where did you find them? I fancy trying to grow some too. Reminds me of Dungeness
     
  11. freethinker

    freethinker Mindful

    I enjoyed scrolling through this thread and discovering there are many other naturalistic gardeners here! [​IMG]

    Here is a photo of a firethorn bush (on the right) that was a gift from nature (not planted), a wild rose bush (over the rainbow) that arched over from next door's garden and a lawn meadow in the background (that I actually created!)
    upload_2018-2-14_18-13-17.jpeg
     
  12. Leafster

    Leafster From the FRow

    freethinker, we seem to share a few plants in common. There's a firebush between me and a neighbour which I can see from my office when I'm working from home. The birds love the berries.

    That peony seems to be doing well - I've had to move one of mine as it was right by the roadside and someone nicked all the flowers last year!

    Is that a euyonmus fortunei behind the planter? I've used a lot of them for all-year round colour and structure.
     
  13. freethinker

    freethinker Mindful

    Yes it's a euyonmus fortunei - very observant of you (a plant I bought and still thriving!)

    I've had worse than someone nicking flowers (from my front garden) i.e. a nutter/obsessive asbo neighbour bleached (and killed) a lovely white rose bush I had there....a case of don't get me started! [​IMG]
     
  14. freethinker

    freethinker Mindful

    Here is my front garden with a garden escape - red valerian - managing to establish itself in the concrete!
    upload_2018-2-14_21-11-1.jpeg
     
  15. gentlegreen

    gentlegreen "grade A liberal mug"

    Rare Samphire Seeds - 50 seeds - UK SELLER | eBay

    I also have some seeds of Soda Commun / Okahijiki / Salsola Soda which is the Mediterranean equivalent - and also some narrow-leaved plantain ...
     
  16. scifisam

    scifisam feck! arse! girls! drink!

    Thanks, I'll get some I have tried growing okahijiki before and it didn't do very well, but it might have been down to where I was growing it.
     
  17. wayward bob

    wayward bob i ate all your bees

    kid2 was massively excited about these when we first saw them. our experiments needed more work tbf :D

    [​IMG]
     
  18. gentlegreen

    gentlegreen "grade A liberal mug"

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  19. freethinker

    freethinker Mindful

    I am into upcycling (making creative use of something discarded). I recently found a child's purple cardigan and used it to cover some dingy plant pots (that I wanted to keep for their size). The covered backdrop hides some ugly hooks. (That's my old bike basket on the left!)

    upload_2018-2-15_11-3-18.jpeg
     
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  20. scifisam

    scifisam feck! arse! girls! drink!

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  21. campanula

    campanula plant a seed

    Do tell, nosy gardeners need to know.
     
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  22. geminisnake

    geminisnake a complex mass of conflicting ideas

    Daffodils are not bad for taking colour iirc and it's nearly daffie season :D
     
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  23. gentlegreen

    gentlegreen "grade A liberal mug"

    I've been a bit slack germinating more than one eupatorium purpureum - or at least I hope it turns out to be that, and I've run out of headroom on my LED shelves, so I have bent it to encourage the side shoots and the sprouts at the base and I will try to root some cuttings over the next few months while waiting for spring.

    A rather indulgent waste of electricity, but it's something to look at during the dark months. :)

    bentplant.jpg
     
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  24. Boudicca

    Boudicca Seaside Queen

    Update - I have bought a bush Opal from Macpennys for £22.50. I forgot to ask them about rootstock, but they definitely do grow their own stuff. It's really a present for the house as I'm not sure I'll still be here when it starts to fruit, but I wanted to put something edible into the garden.

    I saw a hazelnut tree there too, which got me wondering about walnuts as I remember picking fresh walnuts as a child.

    ETA I've just googled, 25-35m tall might be a bit much....
     
  25. wayward bob

    wayward bob i ate all your bees

  26. campanula

    campanula plant a seed

    I find plums to be one of the least troublesome home-grown fruit trees - a ripe plum is a delight and the blossom is always lovely. It should start to produce fruit after 3 years or so (they are bred to be more precocious, these days. Walnut, which used to take a good decade before any nuts were produced (even 20years) come in varieties such as Broadview, which crop after 4 years...but yep - big and they exude an allopathic substance which interferes with plant growth in the vicinity of the walnut roots.

    You could have a filbert though (corylus avellana). I have Cosford, which produces a terrific crop of nuts every year (unlike the wholly unreliable almond or antisocial walnut). Fresh nuts are a revelation and I make a large jar of praline which I liberally sprinkle on ice-cream. Grows as an upright, multi-stemmed shrub...but I have also branched out into trying a trazel (coryllus colurna) - the much taller. single trunked Turkish hazel
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2018
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  27. Leafster

    Leafster From the FRow

    I have a corkscrew hazel in my garden. It was one of the first things I planted when I started clearing the jungle that was here when I moved in. It's a bit of a non-entity with leaves but does look good in the winter. It even had some nuts on it last year but the squirrels got to them before I could. :(
     
  28. campanula

    campanula plant a seed

    Yep, me too - the youngest bought one. However, mine sits in a large pot which I trundle out of sight as soon as leafage appears. Less of a non-entity, imo, and more of an embarrassing horror as the whole thing looks aphid ridden, distorted and ugly. I don't mind twisted willow as the slender leaves do not look diseased...but the enormous crumpled foliage of the hazel is more than I can bear...and is hard to ignore in a tiny town garden (unless shunted behind the bikes by the gate). I agree, that It does have winter appeal. I really ought to put it in the wood, where it would thrive and merge with the rest of the understorey, but youngest is fond of it so...sharing a garden can be a 'mare for the sniffy plant snob; fighting a losing battle against the hydrangea and fuchsia brigade.
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2018
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  29. Leafster

    Leafster From the FRow

    I know what you mean about the leaves but fortunately for me there are sufficient plants which grow up around it during the summer months that draw the eyes away from the deformed leaves. :D
     
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  30. campanula

    campanula plant a seed

    Yep, that's why I really should place mine with other leafy company - as a solitary feature, it exposes the best and the worst traits.

    My stepmother in law had 2 semi-circular beds outside her house, with a specimen tree in each one. Unfortunately, 1 of them was a large corkscrew hazel...while the other was a katsura...which would have been fine if only it wasn't a weeping variety. The pair of utterly mismatched and fugly trees used to make me avert my eyes, all the way down the drive (yep, she had one of those too)...so there they were - horror trees, sticking out like sore thumbs...and yet if she had planted a basic hazel (although a red leaved one would have been choice) and the non-weeping katsura, it would have looked (to my eyes) so much better...instead of overly mucked about with, and horribly false. She regretted the choice, but as a bit of a tree-hugger, wouldn't allow me free reign with a chainsaw.

    eta - I don't mind (much) weeping trees which have a naturally occurring growth pattern - golden willows and birch...but those limbed up or topworked horrors, with a long naked trunk and a flattened umbrella appearance (that horrid little weeping cherry or bizarre standard and weeping roses) do my fucking head in.
     
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