The gardening thread

Discussion in 'suburban75' started by ringo, Feb 11, 2014.

  1. wayward bob

    wayward bob i ate all your bees

    i have more walls than garden :D 15 foot wide would be a generous estimate - i wonder whether i'm developing a little microclimate of my own :cool: we're in town (cardiff) in a large block of gardens terraced all round and our boundaries are mostly 6ft. 2 large brick-built raised beds and while the rest is paved it's all porous so there's a permanent green carpet of moss (and weeds ;))

    orange appears to have flower buds and while i'm not so fussed about the fruit themselves it's the blossom i really want. atm it's acclimatising to the great indoors while i pick all the baby snails off and then it's coming up to the loft :)
     
  2. wayward bob

    wayward bob i ate all your bees

    the first thing i grew from a pip was a lemon. it straggled along but i hung onto it just so i could occasionally make the "it's a lemon tree my dear watson" joke :oops:
     
    gentlegreen likes this.
  3. wayward bob

    wayward bob i ate all your bees

    i read an article the other day about the use of citrus leaves in cooking :cool: most people know about lime leaves but it never occurred to me you could do the same with others.
     
  4. campanula

    campanula plant a seed

    Sounds not unlike my own. Down to the 2 large brick built (well, breeze block) raised beds and encroaching greenery underfoot. Do you have any Mexican daisy, aka erigeron karvinskianus? Or campanula portenschlagiana? If not, I will collect seeds from my erigeron which you can scatter about or poke into and crack, gap, crevice.

    Yes, citrus blossom really is gorgeous - not at all sickly (lilies, hyacinth and those paperwhite narcissus). A perfect essence of summer in a tiny (and rather insignificant little flower.

    Is there good light in the loft? Might be better to stay outdoors with extra temporary protection (such as fleece).
     
  5. wayward bob

    wayward bob i ate all your bees

    more light in the loft than the garden :) a big velux on each side - it's my own personal SAD lamp :cool:
     
    campanula likes this.
  6. ringo

    ringo Macaroni cheese controller

    I'm sticking to Japanese trees from now on
    cordyline.jpg
     
  7. nuffsaid

    nuffsaid But this goes up to 11

    I've got Snowdrops up...first time I've had these. :)
     
    wayward bob and ringo like this.
  8. gentlegreen

    gentlegreen Sproutarian.

    That was a decent size too :(

    Mine has been squeezed into an 80 litre tub for nearly 20 years. I think I lost the main trunk in the winter of 2009 or 2010 so it's now a three-headed bush.
     
  9. ringo

    ringo Macaroni cheese controller

    I planted it 5 years ago. They just have one massive tap root don't they? I wonder if that broke. What are the chances of staking it upright and hoping it survives?
     
  10. gentlegreen

    gentlegreen Sproutarian.

    I really don't know to be honest - it's the only one I've ever had and I have hardly touched it since I planted it - I can't even remember whether mine sprouted "pups" before or after the main trunk got frosted.
     
    ringo likes this.
  11. ringo

    ringo Macaroni cheese controller

    I'll have a go, be a shame to lose it.
     
  12. scifisam

    scifisam feck! arse! girls! drink!

    I just leave my orange and lemon trees in the garden. They're all fruiting now. The dracaensis I had to move outside has died though :( At least I think it has - I might try to rescue it.
     
  13. wayward bob

    wayward bob i ate all your bees

    eep :eek: is that a cordyline? it kind of looks like mine only mine has a long trunk with a teeny tuft of leaves :hmm: which i guess makes it less worried by the wind...

    did it resurrect?
     
  14. wayward bob

    wayward bob i ate all your bees

    i'm quite excited about bringing it in tbh - i can already see the start of leaf growth and blossom buds. i'd just forget about it outside, but now i get a chance to watch it grow. while it's still small enough to shift up the stairs...
     
  15. wayward bob

    wayward bob i ate all your bees

    dear gardening thread

    i have a dwarf korean lilac coming like so

    [​IMG]

    i'm planning to plant it in my front yard in a 50x50 container like so

    [​IMG]

    and underplanting with an established container-grown vinca. does that sound like enough space for both? what growing medium do i need to fill it? the vinca has been in that spot untended for 15+ years...
     
    freethinker likes this.
  16. campanula

    campanula plant a seed

    Is this a true dwarf, like 'Minuet' or 'Pixie' or one of the smaller species such as Korean Lilac (s.meyerii) 'Palibin' or 'Miss Kim', do you know? Either are quite well suited to container culture. Although 50x50cm is doable (in the short term), but an extra 10cm (so around 2 feet diameter...and 15inches deep, say) is ideal...and yep, anything is better than black plastic which will scorch the roots, so a wooden Versailles type planter is excellent. One last thing, lilacs are not keen on acidic soils and, as it will be in a pot for a long time, it is really essential to avoid the peaty multi-purpose composts and instead, go for the loam based John Innes 3 (various brands, John Innes is just a recipe, but Westland and Clover are both good, as is Levington's. Avoid J Arthur Bowyers which is claggy. Peart free composts won't cut the mustard for anything longer than a growing season...and you might want to get some slow release Osmacote granules to put top dress in April. Chuck in a few litres of grit or perlite in the mix, as straight John Innes can get a bit compacted, causing drainage issues.

    Watering, in summer, can be an issue (my whole fecking garden is container based)...but you can do sneaky things with shoelaces and gallon containers if you are going away.

    I have a Lilac just arrived myself (an Xmas pressie). Mines likely to grow up to be a monster though (Katherine Havermeyer). Excited. I am on a bit of a fragrance kick this year.
     
  17. wayward bob

    wayward bob i ate all your bees

    Syringa Palibin :thumbs:
     
  18. wayward bob

    wayward bob i ate all your bees

    i was hoping i could cobble together something to fill it out of well-enriched garden soil and compost and something else cheap :D possible? :hmm:
     
  19. campanula

    campanula plant a seed

    Oh lovely, they get a little taller than the new(ish) dwarf Lilacs...but are (imo) more robust, far less likely to have any grafting or suckering issues and have a longer (but not quite as intense) period of bloom.

    Eta, if you are not in London (with London clay and acidic soil), then yeah, you could use garden topsoil and some home-made compost...but a 30litre bag of JI is £6.99 tops and will not need replacing for the life of the plant. Thinking on it, even if you do choose to buy some JI, I really, really recommend popping a few handfuls of 'live' garden soil to kickstart mycchorhizae (fungal helpers - you can buy granules but they are available from under any old tree or bush for free).
     
    wayward bob likes this.
  20. wayward bob

    wayward bob i ate all your bees

    i don't really go away :D
     
  21. wayward bob

    wayward bob i ate all your bees

    out the back i have a deliberate dwarf lilac and an accidental not-at-all-dwarf lilac growing in/over from next door :D

    website claims it flowers twice :cool:
     
  22. wayward bob

    wayward bob i ate all your bees

    container size i have to balance the space for plants and bins :mad:
     
  23. campanula

    campanula plant a seed

    [QUOTE="wayward bob, post: 15408288, member: 10665"
    website claims it flowers twice :cool:[/QUOTE]

    Yeah it does...but usually only if you trim off the first flush of flowers after blooming...and we have a nice warm summer, you might get another go round in September. A hit of tomato food after the first flush would definitely do no harm either. I no longer grow Palibin, but when I did it was much wider than taller because I just lopped off the top 18inches every July (same as the lavender) so it got quite dense and hedge-like.
     
  24. campanula

    campanula plant a seed

    Yeah, me too - it's a nightmare for a greedy gardener. No seating (or even standing room) anywhere, have to squeeze sideways to get to back gate, attacked by roses. a million tiny pots to water every bloody day (I don't 'go away' either).

    The bins (all 3 of them) have been living on the front road for years now...no bikes in the garden either...or people (except me).
     
    BoatieBird likes this.
  25. wayward bob

    wayward bob i ate all your bees

    i had rosemary hedges for a while because i thought it was the only thing i couldn't kill. i was wrong :(

    i can manage dead-heading if i remember. i usually feed sporadically in the summer with seaweed because it seems relatively all-purpose.

    my issue with urban gardening is delivery costs for heavy but basic materials. a garden centre visit is a very rare treat for me, so i'm left with the local bargain shop and (when i had one) a pushchair for compost :D
     
  26. wayward bob

    wayward bob i ate all your bees

    when i have spare cash i invest in big pots :D i made the raised beds with double-width walls to cover big pots & seating in one fell swoop ;)
     
  27. wayward bob

    wayward bob i ate all your bees

    the neighbours used to give us grief for keeping the bin bags out front - i plant shrubs in the hope they might stop noticing/caring :D
     
    campanula likes this.
  28. campanula

    campanula plant a seed

    This is uncanny - ME TOO. Except I used breeze block and wide wooden coping (which was designated for seating ho ho ho) - now entirely filled with pots. And because I grow lots of tiny things like auriculas and lewisias and tiny alpines, there are also dozens of titchy little terracotta pots. I can get soil and such in the pick-up now (but I don't drive) but my daughter and I have both hauled soil home in a variety of contraptions, from pushchair, bike trailer to hanging off bike handlebars...and I agree, it is not fun.
    Potting mixes are possibly my biggest garden expense - I get through shitloads of it but have to buy in 30 litre bags because space. I do re-use my soil, over and over though, tipping germination fails, annuals, veggie pots and all the remains of potting on, back into a big bin, (leaving old roots for drainage).
     
    wayward bob likes this.
  29. campanula

    campanula plant a seed

    Oh, the bins are the least of it -also out the front are a battered red pick-up truck, some gigantic metal shelves destined for the shipping container but, 6 months on, are still sitting on the hard standing, plus a huge treadle lathe, a collection of bikes, a pile of timber, pair of ladders, the upturned top of the pick-up, my allotment compost bags, various salvias, stone troughs, old sinks with plants in, a window frame (also awaiting transport elsewhere)...and 3 wheelie bins.
     
    BoatieBird and wayward bob like this.
  30. wayward bob

    wayward bob i ate all your bees

    we have one small wheelie bin every 2 weeks. for 4...
     

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