The gardening thread

Discussion in 'suburban75' started by ringo, Feb 11, 2014.

  1. May Kasahara

    May Kasahara thoughts start with a laser sound

    Thanks campanula, it is indeed a Victoria.
     
  2. campanula

    campanula plant a seed

    [QUOTE="May Kasahara, post: 15264912, member: 22204"
    My plum tree gets sawfly or something every bastard year (caterpillars in plums). How can I stop the little fuckers?
    /QUOTE]

    Got on the RHS website and there are a couple of things you can do before bringing out the big guns (apparently deltamethrin is the approved pesticide). The site mentions pheromone traps but I have to say I am very ambivalent about these since they were never designed to be a preventative but only used to warn of the arrival of codling moths etc. Imo, the pheromones actually acts as attractants and possibly cause more problems than they solve...but what was interesting is to do the same trick I actually do for pear midge...which is to break up the soil surrounding the base of the tree and expose the undersurface which will kill off over-wintering larvae. You can do this any time from November (when the first frosts start to hit).
     
    May Kasahara likes this.
  3. May Kasahara

    May Kasahara thoughts start with a laser sound

    I'll certainly do that, thanks :)
     
  4. iona

    iona toxic clown

    Can any of urban's green-fingered types help me out?

    I have a zz plant - zamioculcas zamiifolia - whose new leaves are turning yellow, then going brown and dying. This is only happening to a couple of new stems (incidentally these are much taller than the rest, with leaves that start higher up and are spaced further apart along the stem); the rest of the plant looks fine, no discoloured leaves or other problems I can see.

    [​IMG]

    I don't think I'm overwatering - it gets watered once or twice a month, and I let the water drain out from the bottom of the pot before replacing it so it's not sat in a dish of water. It sits by a window but gets little to no direct sunlight. I'm planning to move it once it gets colder but I think it's okay for now, and I've read that cold usually causes black leaves. The pot it's in is quite small though, I've been meaning to repot it. Could that be the issue? Or something else entirely?

    I've never managed to keep a plant alive this long before so I'll be gutted if it dies now :(
     
  5. Rutita1

    Rutita1 Scum with no integrity, apparently.

    How to Care for a Zamioculcas Zamiifolia Plant With Yellowing Leaves
    or...

    Much like cacti, they need less rather than more water. Water theplant only when the soil has dried out. The rare way you can kill this plant is to over water it. A ZZ plant turning yellow means that it is getting too much water and its underground rhizomes may be rotting.19 Feb 2015
    ZZ Plant Care Instructions: How To Grow ZZ Plants
     
  6. iona

    iona toxic clown

    Yeah but like I said, I'm pretty certain this isn't overwatering.
     
  7. campanula

    campanula plant a seed

    Um, well, there would usually be a deafening silence from me (serial houseplant killer) but I asked daughter-in-law - (succulent and orchid queen) and she suggests knocking it out of the pot and having a look at the roots - they are fat tuberous things and fairly robust. Any rotting should be apparent but, she also thought it might even be underwatering and it is going into its 'drought' mode by keeping all available fluid in its stems and dropping leaves...(although I would have expected the older growth to be doing that rather than new shoots). Has it undergone any changes, especially temperature related?
    A would agree that it is worth checking out the roots as repotting might be an option.
     
  8. campanula

    campanula plant a seed

    Seeds! Although I am slightly depressed by my hoarding tendencies. I have boxes of seeds from at least 3 years ago...and, if I didn't get around to sowing them back then, it seems highly unlikely I am going to do it this year either...not least because there are, quite literally, hundreds of little baggies,envelopes, wraps, dog-poo bags, pages from books, even folded shopping receipts, filled with seeds from this year alone, all waiting to be sown. Even while I am getting through them at a fairly rapid clip (I sowed another dozen different species today), I am assailed by the sinking feeling that I am, as usual, storing up a massive headache if even a fraction of them germinate. I am out of control. though, cackling like some horticultural Scrooge over the sheer profligate variety (and amount) of plants to be had (for free). Shamefully, having sown far too many, I stuff them in the ground at the earliest opportunity where, all too often, it is out of sight, out of mind. I am fairly sure there is some political analogy to be garnered here from this insane seed greed...and fear it is not my fondly imagined green socialism but a horrid capitalist accumulation and domination.
    I am more than happy to send some of this potential Urbwards. Too many to list but hey, what would you like?
     
    gentlegreen likes this.
  9. Rutita1

    Rutita1 Scum with no integrity, apparently.

    Those links also suggest checking roots for rot and repotting.
     
  10. gentlegreen

    gentlegreen Sproutarian.

    With the anemone forest cut down to foliage level, my brug is revealed in all of its monstrous size.
    I suspect callers find it a little intimidating :D
    I put my third pair of hanging baskets on top of the porch for now - with a hefty safety wire in case of hurricanes.

    monsterbrug.jpg
     
    clicker, BoatieBird and scifisam like this.
  11. gentlegreen

    gentlegreen Sproutarian.

    Better late than never :)
    I hope the wind doesn't keep the fragrance from my bedroom above ...

    firstbrug.jpg
     
  12. angusmcfangus

    angusmcfangus Well-Known Member

    IMG_20171020_123432604.jpg Picked up two donkeys tails for £18 at the flower market this morning.
    Just have to wait for my macrame hanging basket holders to come from China.
     
    gentlegreen and ringo like this.
  13. gentlegreen

    gentlegreen Sproutarian.

    For my shame, I have been torturing a small collection of succulents - this weekend is the last chance to save them. :oops:
     
    angusmcfangus likes this.
  14. gentlegreen

    gentlegreen Sproutarian.

    Borderline frost threat for Monday a.m. hopefully it won't damage my brug. :(
     
  15. Leafster

    Leafster Nurturing green fingers

    It looks like there's a possibility of a frost first thing in the morning on Monday here too. I still haven't got around to taking cuttings of my Salvia Amistad yet :oops: so I ought to get a move on if there's any hope of keeping any over the winter.
     
    campanula likes this.
  16. Leafster

    Leafster Nurturing green fingers

    It seems like a good autumn for fruits and berries in my garden.

    I don't think I've seen such large fruits on this fuchsia before.

    [​IMG]
     
  17. scifisam

    scifisam feck! arse! girls! drink!

    I've just looked them up and they're wine! Have any of you ever done that? I have two enormous fuchsia with loads of berries.
     
  18. campanula

    campanula plant a seed

    They are edible...in fact, I seem to recall a fuchsia being bred specifically for prolific fruiting with a high sugar content. Have a nibble when they are ripe (dark plummy black).
     
    Leafster likes this.
  19. ShiftyBagLady

    ShiftyBagLady Thinks she is a flower to be looked at

    Is it too late to plant spring flowering bulbs now? I've had a notion that I would be prepared to empty all of my balcony rail boxes and plant them with a bulb lasagne. There's only six inches to plant in (with two uncles at the bottom for drainage etc) so I'm thinking snowdrops, crocus, tulips and small alliums. Is that ambitious and should I wait to plant it all up or try to do it this weekend. Haven't actually bought the bulbs yet...
     
  20. campanula

    campanula plant a seed

    Nope, I have planted Tulips the week before Xmas and they come up just fine. At the very worst, narcissus might not have enough time to put out a decent root structure so have a possibility of coming up blind...but as long as the bulbs are healthy - plump, not shrivelled and mouldy, you should be OK and will also get the benefit of end of season sales. Just a shout out for the little iris reticulata as perfect February jewels, along with crocus. Snowdrops, though, will be very iffy indeed - they absolutely resent being out of the ground - hard enough to establish from bulbs planted in August/September and almost impossible now...but look out for already planted varieties in pots. Alliums also mostly fine.
     
    ShiftyBagLady likes this.
  21. gentlegreen

    gentlegreen Sproutarian.

    Well that was a bit nippy on the old fingers on the way in this morning :(
    It went down to under 5 degrees in my porch.
    I really should have brought in the spider plants, but I sort of want to know how tough they are.
    South African and minimum temp generally quoted as the standard 7 degrees C conservatory minimum.
    I will be keeping an eye on this one from work as the sun comes up :hmm:

    My dahlia is still out there too ...

    frosty.png
     
  22. Leafster

    Leafster Nurturing green fingers

    Very chilly here for an October night. The thermometer in the courtyard says it was down to 1.2°C last night. You mentioning your spider plant has reminded me that my Sansevieria and Monstera are still out there hidden amongst the other plants. :(
     
  23. gentlegreen

    gentlegreen Sproutarian.

    University of Florida, IFAS says 35F for spider plants - 1.6666 C
     
  24. ringo

    ringo Macaroni cheese controller

    I ordered five English Yew bare roots trees so I could make them into bonsai for the parents etc Xmas presents. They've arrived about 60cm tall, think they're a bit big. Reckon I'll pot them up for now and prune them into clouds.

    Went onto a website to buy smaller ones and ended up buying 10 trees, some for bonsai and some small Japanese holly to train into clouds myself.

    Getting a bit obsessed, I've already bought about 30 trees this year :D
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2017
  25. ringo

    ringo Macaroni cheese controller

    Chaenomeles looking good
    [​IMG]
     
    May Kasahara, clicker and scifisam like this.
  26. gentlegreen

    gentlegreen Sproutarian.

    I feel sure mine used to flower in the spring :hmm:



    Sent from my Moto G (4) sitting on the bog using Tapatalk
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2017
  27. gentlegreen

    gentlegreen Sproutarian.

    Well I finally have to admit defeat. It's another nippy start next Monday.
    I've switched from stir-fry to veggie stew, I'm switching to long trousers, and I will be bringing in my spider plants before I lose them.

    The big brug out the front should be OK until the end of the year unless we have a surprise freeze.
    I have a couple of shoots that would make good cuttings, but the giant leaves look too good.
    With a bit of luck I will get it under cover early enough to have it sprout from old wood next year.

    The ones in the back garden didn't do much this year so they'll be going in the greenhouse.
     
  28. ringo

    ringo Macaroni cheese controller

    Odd isn't it. It's a Chaenomeles speciosa Hot Fire = 'Minvesu'. Online info says spring too. I can't remember where I got it, but I've had it since the summer. Seems very happy flowering now.
     
    gentlegreen likes this.
  29. ringo

    ringo Macaroni cheese controller

    Can I just pot mine up and leave it in the conservatory all winter? No idea what root cuttings are etc, but will learn if I need to do that.
     
  30. gentlegreen

    gentlegreen Sproutarian.

    Root pruning - as in bonsai : ;)

    So they can flourish in the same size pot year after year.

    If your conservatory is frost-free you have the perfect situation and should be able to build them into nice trees. :)
     
    ringo likes this.

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice