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Sleepless Brixton - local residents launch campaign in response to boozy, shouty Brixton

Discussion in 'Brixton' started by editor, Aug 3, 2017.

  1. Nanker Phelge

    Nanker Phelge Monkey Boy

    There are a lot more venues, and a lot more 'open air' venues in Brixton.

    I know for certain that the venues I've worked with are very conscientious around keeping the neighbours on side, and carrying out council imposed noise restriction measures.

    I guess you can't control your customers after you've flogged them gallons of booze and set them loose into the night.

    I think this 'noise' of entitlement theory has some legs, but how do you tackle that? Foreboding street wardens hushing everyone up (potential moonlighting opportunity for librarians)?

    I live next door to a shared house full of well-heeled professionals, and they often have their well-heeled friends around for dinner parties in the garden, and these all start off quite civilised and quiet, but as the night goes on they start to get out the guitar and have coldplay singalongs, followed by (and this always happens) one of them ranting about what a shit job they have, and how they are gonna march in the CEO's office tomorrow and call him 'a cunt' or whatever...

    ....and if it was a Saturday night, I wouldn't be so fussed, but on a Wednesday/Thursday evening in the summer, when I've got to get up the at 5am, I could fucking do without it. So when I've made noises of the 'shut the fuck up' kind, they suggest I'm the unreasonable one for wanting to sleep on a work night.

    Fact is, missing a night's sleep can take a lot of recovery as you get older, and some of the residents in involved in this are older, have lived there for a long time, and have a right to raise the issue if their quality of life is being significantly impacted b economic changes to the area.

    I don't know what the answer is, but the cause hasmy sympathy
     
    innit and Maharani like this.
  2. CH1

    CH1 "Red Guard"(NLYL)

    Maharani likes this.
  3. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    I don't think it's even slightly fair to bring up the 414 here, even as an example. They've long had a good relationship with local residents, their bouncers are very proactive at keeping people quiet outside and if you've ever been, you'd know that their customers are just about the least likely to go braying their way through the streets of Brixton. The fact that they've been there for 30-odd years speaks volumes of how integrated they are with the community - unlike some of these new late night bars.
     
  4. bimble

    bimble uber-hippy twonk peanut

    Up on the roofgarden at 414 when I was last there every time someone raised their voice above a quiet murmur other people shushed them quite forcefully, so (at least that night) there was a lot of awareness of not disturbing neighbours. Maybe there'd been a recent complaint.
     
    editor likes this.
  5. sealion

    sealion If you can't dance just nod your head

    They're not but it's not cheap to soundproof.
     
  6. Rushy

    Rushy AKA some / certain posters

    But it's very cheap to adjust the volume to suit the structure of the building chosen to contain the noise.
     
  7. sealion

    sealion If you can't dance just nod your head

    Turn the volume down and you simply lose custom if it's not loud enough.
     
  8. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    There's other ways the sound levels can be controlled: astute use of the EQ can knock out the frequencies that cause the most disturbance without losing too much volume.
     
    billythefish likes this.
  9. Rushy

    Rushy AKA some / certain posters

    Sure. Need to find a venue which can contain the required sound levels. Not one built before amplifiers even existed!
     
  10. sealion

    sealion If you can't dance just nod your head

    That's not easy in London anymore.
     
  11. shakespearegirl

    shakespearegirl just worked out taglines

    I live next door to a shared house full of well-heeled professionals, and they often have their well-heeled friends around for dinner parties in the garden, and these all start off quite civilised and quiet, but as the night goes on they start to get out the guitar and have coldplay singalongs, followed by (and this always happens) one of them ranting about what a shit job they have, and how they are gonna march in the CEO's office tomorrow and call him 'a cunt' or whatever...

    ....and if it was a Saturday night, I wouldn't be so fussed, but on a Wednesday/Thursday evening in the summer, when I've got to get up the at 5am, I could fucking do without it. So when I've made noises of the 'shut the fuck up' kind, they suggest I'm the unreasonable one for wanting to sleep on a work night.

    Fact is, missing a night's sleep can take a lot of recovery as you get older, and some of the residents in involved in this are older, have lived there for a long time, and have a right to raise the issue if their quality of life is being significantly impacted b economic changes to the area.

    This sounds exactly like my neighbours. After quite a few talking too's the current ones aren't too bad and if we bang on the window they shut up and go inside. But the previous girls spent many a late night shrieking on and on about their imaginary weddings at high volume.

    To be fair though, when I was their ages in shared houses we had loads of parties and probably fucked off the neighbours as well.
     
    friendofdorothy likes this.
  12. sealion

    sealion If you can't dance just nod your head

    No bass :mad:
     
  13. skyscraper101

    skyscraper101 0891 50 50 50

    People who shout and scream in the street are dickheads simple. People just seem oblivious to their own noise pollution.

    I used to live just off the Fulham Road opposite this Italian restaurant which would often get parties of people in, and be open until gone midnight. People would loiter about outside to have a cigarette and shout and scream at each other after a few drinks. My ground floor bedroom was literally the other side of the small road. I lost count of the number of times I had to politely go over and tell them I'm trying to sleep, only for them to start screaming again 5 minutes later and they then got the full force of my fuckedoffness.
     
    Maharani likes this.
  14. T & P

    T & P |-o-| (-o-) |-o-|

    I'm not saying the 414 or its customers are guilty of any noise. I'm wondering what possible measures would the campaigners suggest should be adopted to tackle the problem, and suggested some of them, such as a hypothetical cutting of the opening times of the venues some people see as part of the problem, might cause a domino effect and end up affecting all nightlife spots in Brixton. I was actually using the 414 as an example of how shitty Brixton nightlife could become if Council officials went a bit too gun-ho and decided to curtail the opening hours of all venues, including venerable ones like the 414 that are invaluable assests to the area.
     
  15. Nanker Phelge

    Nanker Phelge Monkey Boy

    I tended to live in shared houses in areas where shared houses were common and noise was common (at weekends).

    I remember when Elm Park road seemed to be all shared housing with various parties happening at various times and everyone just ducking in and out of each other's gaff..

    ETA - we still respected that at certains times and in certain places it was right to keep noise down.
     
  16. T & P

    T & P |-o-| (-o-) |-o-|

    RE neighbours. IME the alleged social class has always had fuck all to do with how noisy someone can be. Noisy twats come in all shapes, forms and social classes.
     
  17. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    That's not my quote, by the way.
     
  18. Nanker Phelge

    Nanker Phelge Monkey Boy

    How did that happen?
     
  19. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    Better no bass than no club.
     
  20. Nanker Phelge

    Nanker Phelge Monkey Boy

    This - especially after lots of 'substances'

    on my current street if people are having a party they tell you, and they tell you when it's gonna end, and 9 times out of 10, they stick to it....
     
  21. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    If all the venues were as considerate and community minded as the 414, and were filled on the whole with non braying customers, then there would be no need to cut hours anywhere.

    There is a different sort of person filling the streets of Brixton now and a lot of them seem to have a lot less respect for the area and its residents. That posh twat I confronted a few months back kicking a glass at the Albert customers is a good example of the nu-Brixton mob. He wouldn't have dared set foot in the town a decade ago.
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2017
  22. shakespearegirl

    shakespearegirl just worked out taglines

    That was me!
     
    editor likes this.
  23. Rushy

    Rushy AKA some / certain posters

    Sure. But the options remain:
    1) find an appropriate venue for your particular needs
    2) adapt an inappropriate venue to your particular needs.
    If it's hard to find or expensive to adapt that's a problem. But not for the person who lives above the recently closed cafe you may want to turn into London's latest dj bar.
     
    Nanker Phelge likes this.
  24. lazythursday

    lazythursday Well-Known Member

    While I don't know Brixton these days I'm watching a location near to me get noisier and noiser, having gained a reputation for a good place to go out - and it certainly includes well heeled professionals but also working class people dressed up for a night out. The common denominator isn't really class, it's amount of alcohol consumed. There are about eight new venues in just a few streets and an increasing focus on high strength craft beers. People get pissed, shout, and piss in the street, it's just what happens. I think the only real solution to this is a restriction on the amount of alcohol licences in problem areas and the police/councils actually using the laws that exist - eg arresting people for drunk and disorderly, fining bars that are serving already pissed people. And long term cultural change about the role of alcohol in our society, but that seems unlikely to ever happen.
     
  25. lefteri

    lefteri Well-Known Member

    Supposedly it is happening - young people are drinking less than the older generations did at their age - but it's hard to believe when you walk around at 12 on a Friday night
     
    Maharani and Winot like this.
  26. lazythursday

    lazythursday Well-Known Member

    Yeah, I know this is supposed to be happening, and it might well be correct that there are less under 25s out getting pissed, but in my area anyway the enthusiastically wankered 25-60 year olds more than make up for any drop-off among the youth.
     
  27. ViolentPanda

    ViolentPanda Hardly getting over it.

    Nope, it usually means they're on a doughnut run.
     
  28. ViolentPanda

    ViolentPanda Hardly getting over it.

    The problem is that local authorities are loath to restrict licences if it means business rates taking a hit, and if - as with central Brixton - the area is a mixed use zone (residential AND business), they tend to favour business because they contribute more to council coffers, and the Old Bill like the idea of confining "party culture" to a single zone as much as possible. Central Brixton is getting the shitty end of a policy stick. :(
     
    Gramsci likes this.
  29. Nanker Phelge

    Nanker Phelge Monkey Boy

    My 20 year old will go out and drink with his mates, but they are also likely to go to a coffee shop and sit around drinking tea/coffee etc....
     
    lefteri likes this.
  30. sealion

    sealion If you can't dance just nod your head

    Thanks. I will pass this info on.
     

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