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Save British Bees

Discussion in 'protest, direct action and demos' started by Quartz, Jun 27, 2014.

  1. Greebo

    Greebo 'scuse me, Mrs May, can I have my country back? R.I.P.

    signed
     
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  2. Duncan2

    Duncan2 Well-Known Member

    Signed and shared poor bees:(
     
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  3. ska invita

    ska invita back on the other side

    BUMP


    I havent seen a single bee this year :(
    really not right...
     
  4. farmerbarleymow

    farmerbarleymow suspicious sweetcorn

    I've only seen a couple so far. :(
     
  5. ska invita

    ska invita back on the other side

    i did see one crawling around on the floor about to die in april :eek:
     
  6. Artaxerxes

    Artaxerxes Well-Known Member

    I've seen a fair few, but not a massive amount :(
     
  7. StoneRoad

    StoneRoad RIP Greebo being kinder heckling from the back!

    *BUMP*

    so the vermin (Liz Truzz) has snuck out permission to use these bee-killing pesticides just a day before the summer recess.

    IMO this stinks ...

    check on 38 degrees for further information / possible protests.
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2015
  8. Quartz

    Quartz Eclectic contrarian plebeian

    Vermin's too nice a word for her; fyachie meikle wartle fits the bill better.
     
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  9. Yuwipi Woman

    Yuwipi Woman Whack-A-Mole Queen

    I want to address this a bit. I'm all for bees and their disappearance is a problem. However, I have my doubts that the human race would cease to exist.

    Most of the crops we depend upon are wind pollinated: corn, wheat, oats, rye, wild rice, some tree nuts. Where we run into trouble is with many fruit trees, almonds, lemons, etc. Only about 30% of what we eat comes from bee pollinated crops. That would certainly be a problem, but it probably wouldn't mean our extinction. Bees are already extinct in some parts of the world. There's parts of China where they send workers out to apple orchards with a feather duster to pollinate the trees.

    That said, I'm still getting rid of my front yard and replacing it with bee friendly flowers. Its going to be interesting when the city sees my crop of milkweed. We'll see if they give me grief for my "noxious weeds." I planted those for the monarch butterflies, whose numbers have dropped so far the US government is considering putting them on the endangered species list.

    Bayer, Syngenta, Monsanto, and their ilk do need to be confronted. There's growing evidence that their money-making schemes often come with high price-tags for the planet and us. In confronting them we need the most accurate information possible. Otherwise, we just get dismissed as hysterical or uninformed.
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2015
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  10. Duncan2

    Duncan2 Well-Known Member

    was gratified to see an abundance of bees busy among the rather splendid crop of thistles in the nearby meadow.It almost seemed that there were as many bees as there were clumps of thistles.These were all what I would call honey-bees though dull orange abdomen not the large bumble-bees that used to be so common.
     
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  11. BCBlues

    BCBlues Lend us a Twenner

  12. Yuwipi Woman

    Yuwipi Woman Whack-A-Mole Queen

    That's part of the problem. Bees like things that humans consider weeds.
     
  13. Quartz

    Quartz Eclectic contrarian plebeian

    My mother's bees were much in demand by local farmers.

    A 30% drop in food would be more than enough of a reason for war, civil unrest, and mass starvation.
     
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  14. Yuwipi Woman

    Yuwipi Woman Whack-A-Mole Queen

    I should have been more specific. In the US, the use of Round-up Ready seeds has led to many fewer weeds in corn fields. Bees don't particularly care for corn. They consider it "starvation food." They like clovers, thistles, milkweeds, etc. The acreage of those things has decreased with the increase in use of glycophosphate. We're also planting more acres to human food that used to be pasture/native prairie.

    Yes, it very much would. That's not the "extinction event" that I keep hearing about in bee preservation circles. We might very well go extinct, but its likely to be global climate change that causes it.
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2015
  15. StoneRoad

    StoneRoad RIP Greebo being kinder heckling from the back!

    I've made a point of having a bee and butterfly-friendly garden for many years now - will have to see if I can expand my range.
     
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  16. Fingers

    Fingers From Tuscany SE22

    I remember when I was seven or eight, used to bust round the house of an acquaintance of my grandmother. He kept bees and grew grape vines. this was obviously back in the day when you could bust round an elderly person's house and spend the day looking at cool stuff and doing cool shit without society deeming him a nonce.

    His bees were ace. I was fascinated. He used to bust into them without any white overalls and stuff, so, so did I.

    I got stung once after I sat my non too hairy arse on one of the poor buggers, but love bees

    bees forever. Save the bees. 100% behind this.
     
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  17. campanula

    campanula am I still bleeding

    Fortunately, amateur beekeeping is on the rise (although since varroa it requires considerably greater pharmacological knowledge). Urban bees are possibly a truly great hope for survival of the species since many gardens are now pesticide free and are offering the diversity which is missing in rural habitats (especially arable areas such as East Anglia).
     
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  18. Artaxerxes

    Artaxerxes Well-Known Member

    The problem is we are now getting a lot of bees, but not a lot for them to actually eat.
     
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  19. BCBlues

    BCBlues Lend us a Twenner

    I moved last year and now have a small garden that backs onto a railway bank, it's all a bit wild at the bottom of the garden so we're leaving it as we've had quite a few bees and butterflies who have also been enjoying the flowers we've planted. We're gonna try to keep it this way, downside was some runner beans we planted got destroyed by blackfly.

    We're pretty new to gardening having lived in flats for years so it's pretty much a live and learn experiment going on.
     
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  20. campanula

    campanula am I still bleeding

    I suspect that the problem is more honey robbing...and these new flow hives which literally drain every smidgeon of honey might be a boon to beekeepers (the joys of separating dead bees from your extractor) but they simply mean the bees end up with an impoverished diet of sugar water. Bees are brilliant foragers and will survive on the meanest diet of old ivy and goat willow, bramble and willowherb - all weeds in huge abundance where there is a scrap of soil.

    BC Blues, all you really need to know is to grow as many simple natives as possible and avoid all heavily hybridised double flowers, many of which will be sterile.
     
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  21. campanula

    campanula am I still bleeding

    eta - dbl post?
     
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  22. andysays

    andysays Defiantly non-premium member

    And try to have as wide a range of flowering times as possible, so nectar is available for the maximum number of months each year.
     
  23. BCBlues

    BCBlues Lend us a Twenner

    Theyre loving the hanging baskets at the moment, i aint too sure whats in 'em i'll check later (when it stops raining) and they were all over the runner beans when they were flowering.

    Ive got nettles and other nice weeds growing upwards and im guiding some very tall blackberry bushes into my garden from the railway embankment to grow downards and cover an ugly metal fence for me.

    Ive prepared a couple more stretches of border for planting. Any specific seeds/ plants i could put in that will flower late summer as a treat forthe bees and butterflies.
     
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  24. StoneRoad

    StoneRoad RIP Greebo being kinder heckling from the back!

    BCBlues : re the blackfly - spray with cold soapy (washing up liquid) water. and plant marigolds as companions to the beans.
    Late flowering plants - buddlia is late up here (Northumberland) mine had just started to show the spikes, but not the actual flowers, yet.
    The bees are currently attending to my honeysuckle, let me have a think about other flowers ...
     
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  25. BCBlues

    BCBlues Lend us a Twenner

    I cut the runner beans down just below where the flies were and just wiped the odd ones off. Someone advised me this was the best solution other than pesticide which is when i decided to keep the garden bee friendly. I'll keep the washing up solution in mind though as i planted the beans from seed and they grew like crazy, must be the Birmingham soil.
     
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  26. StoneRoad

    StoneRoad RIP Greebo being kinder heckling from the back!

    It works on broad beans as well, but you do need to keep spraying, it just washes them off and drowns some, but it's not persistent.
     
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  27. Artaxerxes

    Artaxerxes Well-Known Member

    To sort out my Blackfly I used a hairspray sprayer with washing up liquid and a bunch of mashed up garlic, couple of times a week, never managed to get all of them but it got like 85%-90% of them away until the tomatoes were old enough they lost the taste.

    Supposedly water with crushed tomato leaves soaked for 24 hours also works.
     
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  28. campanula

    campanula am I still bleeding

    Feeling glum at the lifting of the neo-nicotinoid ban - Monsanto et al will no doubt be hard at work on Round-Up Ready bees (the bastards). And the fucking (intensive) farming lobby are shits as well.
     
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  29. Yuwipi Woman

    Yuwipi Woman Whack-A-Mole Queen

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  30. campanula

    campanula am I still bleeding

    And control the fucking food chain, the filthy greedy immoral swine.
     
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