1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

PRINCE2

Discussion in 'education & employment' started by The cook, Mar 2, 2012.

  1. Pingu

    Pingu Credo

    for an introduction to agile look here. its not rocket science and if you are used to mini waterfall then all you are doing is saving yourself some admin overhead and then delivering exactly teh same thing using a different method.

    Scrum Training | Free Scrum Master Training

    happy to talk you through the principles if you want
     
    Cakes, RubyToogood and electroplated like this.
  2. electroplated

    electroplated off minehead

    Nice one - I'll have a look and might give you a shout if I have questions! :)
     
  3. fractionMan

    fractionMan Custom Title

    Agile is not the same as Scrum or Kanban. Scrum/Kanban are just two ways of approaching agile development.
     
  4. fractionMan

    fractionMan Custom Title

    Individuals and interactions over processes and tools
    Working software over comprehensive documentation
    Customer collaboration over contract negotiation
    Responding to change over following a plan

    Principles behind the Agile Manifesto
     
  5. Pingu

    Pingu Credo

    scrum and kanban are methods of agile delivery - yes its not Agile (pure) but when someone asks for agile they will normally mean scrum or kanban atm
     
  6. fractionMan

    fractionMan Custom Title

    Depends. Big companies, then probably yes.

    We use neither where I am. we use our own homegrown approach to agile delivery.
     
  7. Pingu

    Pingu Credo

    RubyToogood likes this.
  8. Pingu

    Pingu Credo

    which is kind of the point of agile. one thing i have found with agile is it doesn't scale well. people talk about the "spotify Enterprise Agile"... but in reality it works best with small to medium sized projects. For big ones i tend to use a hybrid of PMP and Kanban. it makes programme level tracking much easier and you still get the advantages of the agile delivery method for the products. It also solves a lot of the issues with the very large number of dependencies as you can waterfall them and then add teh appropriate product to the backlog once the dependency is met
     
  9. RubyToogood

    RubyToogood can't remember what goes here

    Right, I now do have the cash and am considering this again. Gonna be Agile for sure, not Prince2, as I am all about the web projects/website management (I've done a year's study in UX/interaction design and just managed redeveloping the website at work (small org).)

    I'm still applying for jobs and there are two things that I think are preventing me from getting the kind of job I want. One is lack of Drupal experience which is common in my sector, and I'll approach that separately, but the other is knowledge of formal project management methodology. Many jobs specify this. Just having experience isn't good enough.

    Two things I've been wondering are
    1. Whether actually rather than doing a general Agile PM qualification I should do Scrum Product Owner as it seems to go well with UX. Bearing in mind that I usually work in the charity sector and not in full on software/IT organisations, so that might be regarded as too specialist? Is it that specialist? What do you learn really? Would it enable me to tick the "knowledge of formal PM methodology" box?
    2. If general PM, whether to go with APMG as my union have some kind of special rate for this (which may not be all that special really when I investigate).
     
    electroplated likes this.
  10. electroplated

    electroplated off minehead

    I can really relate to this post - I have nearly 20 years experience in tech development roles starting at a self taught junior dev and ending up on the project management/head of development side of things in a series of very small startup tech companies so no formal qualifications or familiarity with official agile (or other) methodology even though the way of working was very similar to agile in spirit in many ways.

    Having recently been made redundant I've felt the lack of agile roles/experience on my CV is a huge turnoff for a lot of recruiters so have been thinking long and hard about the best way to improve things without having to spend $$$ on courses/training etc... Also can't stand all the buzzwords that seem to go hand in hand with agile amongst it's fans which makes me reluctant to even pick up a book about the subject!
     
  11. RubyToogood

    RubyToogood can't remember what goes here

    Bump? It's boring and probably wanky too but I need to decide *sigh*
     

Share This Page