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Peckham Levels: Pop Brixton team takes over Peckham's iconic multi-story car park

clandestino

no llevar papel
I was in Peckham last Friday afternoon - the place is absolutely bonkers. Lively old school south London high street, with pockets of hipster stuff dotted around here and there, and then as you walk towards Bellenden Road suddenly it becomes super posh and you've walked through the looking glass into Dulwich, with dog grooming parlours and the like.

I liked the high street a lot - so much energy and life. It was so....vibrant! *KLAXON*

This multi-storey car park will up the hipster quotient of course, but hopefully it'll be in the style of the Bussey Building rather than Pop Brixton. Which can just fuck off back to Clapham, frankly.
 

editor

hiraethified
Statement from one of the bids that lost out to the all-conquering Collective/Pop team:

We are disappointed by Southwark Council’s decision to award the Peckham multi-storey car park site to a Mayfair-based property developer.
The critically-acclaimed art commissions and cultural programmes created by Bold Tendencies have attracted over 900,000 people to Peckham over the past nine years, and this decision now leaves the future of this award-winning art project in jeopardy.
Southwark Council’s decision also means that the BOLD | HOME proposal, developed by Bold Tendencies and Second Home to create 800 ultra-affordable artist studios in Peckham, cannot go ahead.

With so many artist studios in Southwark and across the city having disappeared over the past decade — and the remaining 30% forecast to disappear in the next five years — this is a terrible result for London.

Under the terms of our detailed proposal, Southwark Council would not have had to invest a penny — we would have invested the entire £3 million construction budget ourselves, and also paid Southwark £200,000 a year in rent, which would have been fantastic deal for the local community.

Statement from Rohan Silva, Sam Aldenton and Hannah Barry
 

T & P

|-o-| (-o-) |-o-|
I've only been to that car park once about three summers ago. The roof level was pleasant enough though the bar and its clientele were very much what people here would describe as 'nu-Brixton'. There were some artworks and artefacts on displayed around the place, including a vintage (well, 1960s anyway) car cut in half and whatnot.

The whole setting was a big disconcerting. It is a massive car park that at the time at least was not in proper use but accepted cars. We happened to be in a car so drove up level after level until we could no more. The place was mostly deserted of cars or people. Finding a lift or stairs that went all the way to the roof proved surprisingly difficult, and frankly it didn't feel very safe. But I guess those who arrived on foot and took a lift from the ground level had a much easier journey to the top.

The level immediately below the roof also has a couple of art exhibits going on, including a small room lined with hay.

The entire square footage of the place is massive. It'll be interesting to see if they have any plans for all the other levels. Very few cars use the venue and banning them altogether would not be much of an issue regarding parking availability in Peckham.
 

Rushy

AKA some / certain posters
Statement from one of the bids that lost out to the all-conquering Collective/Pop team:
That's a bit of a weird statement. Two of the people who put their name to it are from Second Home. Second Home describe themselves thus:
Companies based at Second Home include global companies like SurveyMonkey, Artsy and Foursquare, creative agencies such as Fueled, Visualise and Rooster Punks, and homegrown innovators like Kovert Designs, Chineasy and Santander’s new £100m fin-tech fund.
They're just as corporate.
 

cuppa tee

Well-Known Member
That's a bit of a weird statement. Two of the people who put their name to it are from Second Home. Second Home describe themselves thus:

They're just as corporate.
I was on top of the downs by Avebury the other afternoon and encountered a gent from Tottenham, his PoV was that we are now facing unprecedented predatory stalking by serious money, wondering now if there's any room left in St Leonard's cos this town looks less and less like somewhere I will fit .......
 
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CH1

"Red Guard"(NLYL)
I was on top of the downs by Avebury the other afternoon and encountered a gent from Tottenham, his PoV was that we are now facing unprecedented predatory stalking by serious money, wondering now if there's any room left in St Leonard's cos this town looks less and less like somewhere I will fit .......
Bit mystified about this. I thought Avebury was like Stonehenge.
And St Leonards was like Hastings??

Or were you explaining Rushy? In which case is it possible to be more explicit?
 

CH1

"Red Guard"(NLYL)
You lot should be watching Babylon Freeview ch8
It has unreconstructed railway arches, proper music and proper patois (not rhyming rap).
Everything POP isn't.
 

colacubes

Well-Known Member
That's a bit of a weird statement. Two of the people who put their name to it are from Second Home. Second Home describe themselves thus:

They're just as corporate.
Rohan Silva was until quite recently a Special Advisor to David Cameron.
 

Dan U

Boompty
So the people who lost out are a corporate version of impact hub from Shoreditch led by ex advisors to Cameron?

Regardless of who won, it's hard to cry too many rivers for them.
 

editor

hiraethified
Shameful stuff really. Give the artists nowhere to work and you'll be left with just more palaces of consumption for the middle classes.
Southwark council has rejected plans that would have transformed a multistorey car park in south London into 800 affordable artists’ studios.

The council has instead opted for a rival proposal for the building in Peckhamfrom a Mayfair-based property developer.

Some of the most influential cultural figures in the UK, including the directors of the Tate Modern and the Serpentine Gallery, backed the Bold Home project, which would have provided much-needed cheap studios for artists at a time when such spaces are dwindling.

Southwark council opted for Pop Community Ltd’s application, which will only offer 50 artists’ studios in alongside “multi-use event spaces, pop-up retail and cafe/bar”. The development is a partnership between Carl Turner Architects and multimillion property developers The Collective, a business which is likely to target “ambitious young professionals”.
 
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