OSIRIS-REx to map near-Earth asteroid Bennu and bring back sample, launches Sept 2016

Discussion in 'science, nature and environment' started by editor, Jul 26, 2016.

  1. editor

    editor hiraethified

    Here's one to get excited about:

    [​IMG]

    About OSIRIS-REx
     
  2. editor

    editor hiraethified

    Video:

     
  3. 2hats

    2hats

    Launch from Canaveral Launch Complex 41 on an Atlas V (411 configuration) to a hyperbolic escape trajectory due tonight in a launch window running from 0005BST and 0200BST. Live coverage on NASA TV from 1030BST.
     
    Pickman's model, Signal 11 and editor like this.
  4. 2hats

    2hats

    Successful on time launch. Everything looks good. Next stop (after an earth flyby gravity assist) asteroid Bennu in 2018.
     
    Pickman's model likes this.
  5. editor

    editor hiraethified

    Getting close!

    [​IMG]

    Another Space Diamond! NASA Probe Snaps Great Photo of Asteroid Bennu
     
    spitfire likes this.
  6. editor

    editor hiraethified

    :thumbs:

     
    Limejuice likes this.
  7. editor

    editor hiraethified

    Wookey and Limejuice like this.
  8. Limejuice

    Limejuice Well-Known Member

    Close up, it looks like a squashed Ferrero Rocher.

    :)

    How big are those boulders, and how do they stay planted on the surface? There can't be more than a blush of gravity.
     
  9. editor

    editor hiraethified

  10. editor

    editor hiraethified

  11. editor

    editor hiraethified

    And here's a new twist:

    [​IMG]


    Surprise! 'Active Asteroid' Bennu Is a Rare Particle-Ejecting Space Rock
     
    farmerbarleymow and Wookey like this.
  12. farmerbarleymow

    farmerbarleymow Seagull + Chips = Happy Seagull

    That's something I've not heard of before - just thought they were inert lumps of rock or rubble. Asteroid farts. :cool:
     
  13. 2hats

    2hats

    Quite a number of the moderately small ones are weakly bound rubble piles. The mechanical adhesive properties of the constituent materials are comparable to, or even greater than, the associated gravitational forces in many cases. It's relatively easy for material to drift off the surface of these or be ejected by small impacts (this is, after all, essentially the approach used for the Hayabusa sampling mission), or even for thermal variations throughout the orbit to effectively disturb and loosen material.
     
  14. editor

    editor hiraethified

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