Occupational Pension - Proving you're still alive - wtf?

Discussion in 'education & employment' started by Puddy_Tat, Feb 17, 2018.

  1. Puddy_Tat

    Puddy_Tat meh

    Mum-tat gets a pension from my late father's employer.

    She has recently had a letter from them saying they need something signing to confirm she's still alive, and this needs to be counter-signed by a professional person (doctor, teacher sort of thing)

    She is very concerned about this - she's not all that sociable at the best of times, and isn't really on the sort of terms with anyone she can ask.

    All she can think of is whether the practice nurse at her GP will be able to sign it but is in a panic about asking them and in an even bigger panic about getting her pension stopped if she doesn't get it sorted out.

    I've not seen the actual letter yet so don't know if she has misunderstood something.

    I've had a look on the web and can't find anything about this sort of thing - other than UK pensioners who are now living outside the UK needing to certify they are still alive every now and then.

    Anyone encountered this? Or got any bright ideas?

    The only thing I can think of - assuming that something like sending a recent letter from DWP about her state pension won't do - would to be to pay a solicitor to do a statutory declaration or something like that.
     
  2. mauvais

    mauvais change has become unavoidable

    We're buying a house at the moment. We're getting a gifted contribution from someone and as part of that, they were required to visit a solicitor to sign a declaration that it hasn't come from money laundering, that they can afford it, etc.

    Anyway supposedly getting this notarised cost £7, which didn't seem like a number a solicitor would ever charge. So if you have a solicitor already, perhaps do that.

    Otherwise GPs and so on will do this, but may charge for it. It's the sort of thing you need to do for driving licenses, first passport applications, and so on.

    I've never heard of this case but I imagine the pension provider probably wants to make sure it's going to the pensioner and not whoever inherits their estate.
     
  3. The39thStep

    The39thStep Was it over when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbour?

    I got one of these last year , a year after drawing down a pension early .
     
  4. Throbbing Angel

    Throbbing Angel it's a very pretty colour this ambulance, isn't it

    We get people bringing these in to the Town Hall all the time, usually for foreign pensions, though.

    Ask her to take it to the Council Tax office and as long as she is named on the bill they should stamp & sign it (we would).

    HTH
     
    farmerbarleymow likes this.
  5. The39thStep

    The39thStep Was it over when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbour?

    I just got my misuses daughter to sign it and say she's a nurse
     
  6. rubbershoes

    rubbershoes not the only raver in the village

    Swearing an affidavit with one document exhibited to it costs exactly that sum. A fiver for the swear and £2 for each exhibit
     
    Throbbing Angel and mauvais like this.
  7. souljacker

    souljacker Those tapas loving FUCKS

    If it's the same as a passport, you can get a professional photographer to sign it, if you know any? Also, a licensee of a pub.
     
  8. Puddy_Tat

    Puddy_Tat meh

    thanks for the thoughts

    hadn't thought of that - might suggest that one

    mum-tat would get in an even bigger panic at the idea of doing / having done anything like that

    i am (woo) a chartered professional, but presume that family members aren't allowed to counter-sign this

    seems reasonable, although neither mum-tat or i have ever paid five quid for swearing

    not either of those, but gives a bit of scope for thought - i'll look and see what the list is for passports. mum-tat doesn't do religion in an organised way, so no tame religious leader available either.
     
  9. kabbes

    kabbes "A top 400 poster"

    I know of circumstances where people have kept drawing a pension long after the true owner has died.

    In one case, the pensioner died and her daughter kept drawing it, then the daughter died and the granddaughter kept drawing it. Eventually the pension scheme twigged that there might be something not quite right about their 125 year old member.
     
  10. souljacker

    souljacker Those tapas loving FUCKS

  11. equationgirl

    equationgirl Respect my existence or expect my resistance

    If you know a chartered engineer, any discipline, they can do it.
     
  12. Gromit

    Gromit International Man of Misery

    A GP is a doctor. Some will charge to sign stuff. Some wont.
     
  13. cupid_stunt

    cupid_stunt & dyslexic cnut.

  14. cupid_stunt

    cupid_stunt & dyslexic cnut.

    There's some odd ones for sure on that list, but it doesn't include doctors, further down it says:

    Your countersignatory can’t:
    • work for HM Passport Office
    • be a doctor, unless they state that they know you well (eg good friend) and that they recognise you easily from your photo
     
  15. Gromit

    Gromit International Man of Misery

    I signed a couple as a Senior Civil Servant.

    However, it wasn't until later I realised that they meant a lot senior than I was at said time. They accepted them though.
     
    cupid_stunt likes this.
  16. Winot

    Winot I wholeheartedley agree with your viewpoint

    Yeah it’s a specific term. Grade 5 or above.
     
  17. farmerbarleymow

    farmerbarleymow daft apeth

    cupid_stunt likes this.
  18. Puddy_Tat

    Puddy_Tat meh

    Thanks for the more recent thoughts.

    I think this may be sorted, as mum-tat has rung the pension people (she was hesitant about doing that to start with which didn't help) and think the conclusion was that a small shopkeeper would be ok.

    I suppose i'd better ask if it's sorted...
     
  19. equationgirl

    equationgirl Respect my existence or expect my resistance

    Glad to hear of progress, I think my nan had to sign a form because she was in receipt of her late 2nd husband's occupational pension and he'd died in mid 1970s yet she was still receiving it. There was a large age gap between the two of them though.
     

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