1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

National Gallery exhibitions, visits, chat

Discussion in 'photography, graphics & art' started by editor, Jun 1, 2014.

  1. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    [​IMG]

    I'd never heard of the American artist George Bellows before, but I loved this painting showing a Brooklyn docks scene.

    I've written a piece here - I think I may have to order a book of his work now :)
     
    Yuwipi Woman, Greebo and Red Storm like this.
  2. farmerbarleymow

    farmerbarleymow daft apeth

    That's a nice painting. I like that sort of not photo-realistic paintings where you have more imagination in a weird way looking at the detail and nuances, trying to work out if they are just brush strokes or meant to be there to represent a defect or whatever. Jesus, I sound like fucking Brian Sewell. :D
     
    Greebo likes this.
  3. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    I spent ages looking at and got quite lost in the detail and imagination. I love it when a piece of art does that to me.
     
    Greebo likes this.
  4. oryx

    oryx Sitting on the bock of the day

    We went & admired that painting just last Tuesday. I loved the buildings in the background.

    I think there as an exhibition of Bellows not that long ago in London - maybe even the Dulwich Picture Gallery?
     
    Greebo likes this.
  5. Belushi

    Belushi 01 811 8055 R.I.P.

    Boxing paintings?
     
  6. Belushi

    Belushi 01 811 8055 R.I.P.

    I'm reading all your posts in his voice now.
     
    oryx and Greebo like this.
  7. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    oryx likes this.
  8. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

  9. oryx

    oryx Sitting on the bock of the day

  10. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    He also painted some powerful political works around real war atrocities. Some are really quite unsettling.
    (Scroll down to see some here)
     
  11. Belushi

    Belushi 01 811 8055 R.I.P.

    editor likes this.
  12. Stanley Edwards

    Stanley Edwards Food please.

    I have never heard of him. They look fucking awesome.
     
    editor likes this.
  13. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    It's been a long time since I've been so drawn to the work of a new artist and found myself just standing there soaking it up for ages.
     
  14. Stanley Edwards

    Stanley Edwards Food please.

    Hope the show comes to Madrid. Incredible light and colour.
     
  15. heinous seamus

    heinous seamus til clay-cauld death shall blind my ee

    When I read the thread title I pictured a man called George bellowing at the National Gallery. Nice paintings though!
     
  16. Yuwipi Woman

    Yuwipi Woman Whack-A-Mole Queen

    I'm surprised no one's heard of him. He was one of the more famous artists of his time. He was a student Robert Henri* (one of The Eight). He was both loved and hated for his "Ashcan" style at the time. Rather than paint idealized pictures, he painted scenes from real life. He most famous for paintings of boxers in the ring, but he also painted rich and poor alike.

    [​IMG]

    * if you'all don't know who Robert Henri is, I'm going have to beat you senseless with limp linguini! ;)
     
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2014
  17. Stanley Edwards

    Stanley Edwards Food please.

    The images posted here have got my painting fingers itching. I love the way he uses white. Going to give it a go tomorrow - an Ibiza scene heavily influenced by this thread. May find time to research a bit more before I start.
     
    clicker, Yuwipi Woman and editor like this.
  18. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    I really like some of Henri's work too.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Yuwipi Woman likes this.
  19. Stanley Edwards

    Stanley Edwards Food please.

    Very limited colour palette in most of his stuff, and they are all composed more photographically than cropped camera shots. Interesting stuff. Really want to see it in the flesh so to speak.
     
  20. Stanley Edwards

    Stanley Edwards Food please.

    Long time ago, but I would bet all I had that he used a camera and painted compostionally from photographs. Perhaps adding the dynamic colour on-site later.


    ---/ Which reminds me: I want someone to invent a scanner that can see the charcoal, or lead sketches underneath master pieces. This has to be possible. It would be fascinating.
     
  21. discokermit

    discokermit Well-Known Member

    warmonger.
     
  22. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    Who, Bellows? :confused:
     
  23. discokermit

    discokermit Well-Known Member

    fraid so.

    ill-judged in their appeal to the passion of hatred as anything produced in America’s most hysterical war years…” virgil baker.

    he supported u.s. involvement in ww1, the war paintings were part of this and based on the bryce report rather than any firsthand experience. the bryce report itself is an inaccurate propoganda piece.
     
  24. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    Not so sure how you can snottily dismiss him as a "warmonger" given his actual work and the context of the times he was living in, but whatever. Well done.

    Now can we get back to talking about the art, please.
     
  25. discokermit

    discokermit Well-Known Member

    i am talking about the art. the war paintings were done to make the viewer want to go out and kill germans.
     
  26. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    It was to try and get the US involved in WW1. Personally, I'm rather glad they did get involved.
     
  27. discokermit

    discokermit Well-Known Member

    why?
     
  28. discokermit

    discokermit Well-Known Member

    so he was a warmonger then?
     
  29. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    *gives up
     
  30. discokermit

    discokermit Well-Known Member

    lol! it's all you can do as you've realised your not gonna be able to defend wholesale capitalist slaughter. or your claim he wasn't a warmonger.

    anyways, point is bellows and his work shift through time, from radical to conservative. the fieryness and dirtyness of the early stuff replaced by anodyne portraits of socialites. the armory show of 1913 may have been a blow when he realised how far behind the european avant guard he was and instead of raising his game just knocked out any old shit. from what i can gather, his political trajectory must have followed a similar path. except maybe replacing the armory show with the war.
     
    Sweet FA likes this.

Share This Page