Learning to drive

Discussion in 'transport' started by Black Halo, Aug 25, 2014.

  1. planetgeli

    planetgeli There's no future in England's dreaming

    bimble likes this.
  2. PaoloSanchez

    PaoloSanchez Well-Known Member

    If you don't turn when a suitable gap appears then that might be viewed as "undue hesitation" which is one of the reasons I failed my first test. It's not about "trying to jump across", it's about being able to judge when you have enough time and space to turn. If you are overly cautious then that can work against you too. It's a fine balance and as the saying goes practice makes perfect, and will build confidence.
     
    bimble likes this.
  3. planetgeli

    planetgeli There's no future in England's dreaming

    I'm not disagreeing with you, I'm trying to be realistic. I don't think, though sure I could be wrong, you are going to get a chance at 'undue hesitation' in that part of London.
     
  4. Hellsbells

    Hellsbells World's best procrastinator

    I don't live in a big city (atall!) but there are loads of different driving difficulties here - eg loads of ridiculously steep hill starts, loads of very sharp turns, drivers that tear around really fast, hairy mountain drops, blind spots....etc etc
     
  5. Teaboy

    Teaboy It definitely looks brighter over there..

    I dunno. I've done all those when rural driving and I found them much easier then when I first encountered the hanger lane gyratory or Elephant (before they remodeled it). I've been driving in London regularly for best part of 10 years and there are still some junctions I approach with trepidation. I've only just worked out that if I'm turning right at the Chiswick roundabout (coming from the N.Circular to continue onto the S.Circular) I need to be in the left hand lane. Being in the left hand lane of 4 lanes to turn right but that's how it works. :confused:

    The only proper wtf junction I've encountered outside of London is in Swindon and I don't think anything more needs to be said about that.

    Hill starts should really be a thing of the past in this day of autos and electric parking brakes.

    ETA: Although there is probably less pissed up drivers on London's roads. That seems to not be a legal thing in rural locations.
     
  6. bimble

    bimble noisy but small

    I manage to do Undue Hestitation plenty on busy roads and junctions.
     
  7. PaoloSanchez

    PaoloSanchez Well-Known Member

    It's a confidence thing. The more you practice hopefully the more confident you'll become then things will start to fall into place and it will become almost second nature and you'll automatically know when you can proceed and when to stop under the guidance of a good driving instructor.
     
    SpookyFrank and bimble like this.
  8. SpookyFrank

    SpookyFrank Ridin' a Stutz Bearcat, Jim

    Before you can get this right you have to get good at setting off and picking up speed quickly. You'll soon figure out exactly how much time and space you need to turn right out of a junction or enter a roundabout safely.
     
    doodlelogic and bimble like this.
  9. iona

    iona toxic clown

    I've emailed asking about lessons :thumbs:

    Can anyone recommend something (preferably a website or app, preferably free) to learn the highway code and all that theory shit? I don't need to pass my theory test yet, just familiar enough with it that they'll let me do lessons.
     
  10. bimble

    bimble noisy but small

    iona good on you doing that email. I've deleted all the links i used for the theory test but all learning was done online and I think all I paid was £2 for a hazard perception ap thing. the hazard perception test is basically a really boring video game and you just have to learn how to play to score the points on it, recommend doing a fair bit of practice on that.
    edit: Ignore me, if you don't have to pass the test forget the above waste of time . :thumbs:
     
    iona likes this.
  11. Just buy the Highway Code and read it, it's not a massive tome and everything you need for the theory test is found within its pages.
     
    iona likes this.
  12. Teaboy

    Teaboy It definitely looks brighter over there..

    I would have thought the library would have had copies as well.
     
    iona and Bahnhof Strasse like this.
  13. My dipshit nephew failed the Theory test three times! You can take it as often as you like but the £'s soon mount up. After the third fail I got out of him that he had not read the fucking Highway Code, prick thought he could wing-it :facepalm:
     
    Bears, Spymaster and kebabking like this.
  14. iona

    iona toxic clown

    I've downloaded a free pdf :thumbs:
     
  15. Teaboy

    Teaboy It definitely looks brighter over there..

    He sounds like a danger at the moment. The system is working if its keeping people like him off the road until they can be arsed to learn even the basics.
     
  16. PaoloSanchez

    PaoloSanchez Well-Known Member

    This is true. Getting comfortable with car control and getting a feel for how the car behaves is one of the key factors in being able to judge when you can safely negotiate gaps in traffic to join roundabouts/join a motorway from a slip road/turn right at a junction etc.

    One of the things I found quite challenging when I was learning was to get all the aspects of car control and at the same time observe what's going on around me and take appropriate action. As soon as I tried to concentrate on one particular aspect, eg trying to change gear smoothly, I would lose concentration in another area like steering or observation.
     
    hash tag, SpookyFrank and Hellsbells like this.
  17. Hellsbells

    Hellsbells World's best procrastinator

    Don't know about you, but I find it hard to take anything in if I just read it. If you just do a search for free online driving theory test practice, you can do loads of practice ones. That's what I've been doing. Then I write down the ones I get wrong and try and learn them.
     
    bimble and hash tag like this.
  18. You're right, my sister bought him a Ford Ka for his 17th birthday, money she could ill-afford to spend, but she remembered how keen she and I were to get mobile at 17 so saved for three years to get this for him. He fucks around failing his theory tests and the car is sat outside, insurance and tax paid for but not being used, it suddenly gets smashed up on both sides. Twat claims it was a hit and run, that managed to smash BOTH sides of a parked car. So yeah, he's been taking it for a spin and smashed it, can't control a 1ltr Ford Ka ffs. Luckily he's just gone to Uni in London so will probably not bother with cars again for quite some time. Sister has had the car scrapped.
     
  19. Teaboy

    Teaboy It definitely looks brighter over there..

    Crikey he sounds like fun, hopefully uni will sort him out.

    If he did take that car for a spin and stack it he's one lucky boy. A few years back a guy I worked with brought himself a nearly new car mostly on finance. Two weeks later his 17 year old unlicensed sister decided to take it for a spin whilst he was on holiday. She subsequently wrote it off and the Police gave him two options - either he gave her permission to drive which is an offence in itself and invalidates the insurance or report her for theft. Nasty situation to say the least.
     
    Bahnhof Strasse likes this.
  20. hash tag

    hash tag Pedicabo omnes

    No pressure then :eek: It is good to be a confident (not overly confident driver mind), but well, not so sure about that. Better to be safe than cause an accident?
     
    planetgeli likes this.
  21. hash tag

    hash tag Pedicabo omnes

    I spent lots of time as a kid, being driven around in cars and taking in all the different signs there were out there which probably stood me in good stead.
    As forward wayward drivers Bahnhof Strasse what about a black box. Keeps the insurance costs down by keeping an eye on the driver, but,
    it could prove to be very expensive. I gather three (minor) discretions gets the insurance cancelled.
    I also know of a young driver who has still managed to lose their licence for two indiscretions, I think it was. Also, means at least a resit of test in a while.
     
  22. iona

    iona toxic clown

    Yeah I'm the same. Thanks, that's just the sort of thing I was after :)
     
  23. Yeah me too. But there were no phones or tablets to occupy us back then, now ours even have DVD players and computer games built in to the back of the driver and passenger headrests, I had the choice of look out of the window or watch my sister be sick.


    I think they are the only way to get affordable insurance now, nephew's insurance wasn't bad, but apparently would go up sharply if he passed his test, guess cos he'd then be on his own and driving like a dick. So good things all round I reckon.

    And for the year or two(?) after passing if you get 6 points you lose your license and have to take another test, which is harsh, but then I've never had six points riding at the same time, so fuck the little shits.
     
  24. hash tag

    hash tag Pedicabo omnes

    Sorry, re post above; because of their licence being suspended, the young person I knew of lost their job! A driving licence was essential.
    This also raises the question are driving penalties two leniant? If someone gets a penalty for something or other, you would think they would be extra careful
    for a while. Therefore, maybe two or three penalties in relatively quick sucession should automatically result in a ban, maybe just a few months and a retake?
     
  25. bimble

    bimble noisy but small

    I agree with you but the point is that me doing Undue Hesitation causes other drivers to go into a frenzy of beeping and then try to overtake when there's no room etc, so (I think) that's the reasoning behind it, if I'm not moving fast enough it causes other people's driving to get dangerous.
     
  26. hash tag

    hash tag Pedicabo omnes

    DON'T ever be intimidated by other drivers, just don't. This can lead you being pressured into making mistakes, which could be costly.
    You should only do what you are confisent of doing, what your vehicle is capable of doing, within the confines of the law and not putting
    others at risk. so there.
     
  27. planetgeli

    planetgeli There's no future in England's dreaming

    One last time...on the specific example of being at a green filter traffic light...if the arrow hasn't yet come on, this situation you describe won't happen. That's what I meant about you not getting the chance at 'undue hesitation'. And I totally agree with hash tags better safe than sorry. Traffic lights, the specific example I'm using, are there for a reason, because the junction is dangerous.

    Obviously if you sit waiting to come out of a side road with 1/4 of a mile clear down the road, you'll fail. That's undue hesitation.

    What spooky frank said about getting comfortable with moving off is accurate. And that will come with time.
     
    bimble likes this.
  28. bimble

    bimble noisy but small

    My teacher is great. When people beep and get annoyed he says "If they are not happy they can put their car on their head and walk" (I think this might be an idiom in his first language but haven't asked).
     
    SpookyFrank likes this.
  29. SpookyFrank

    SpookyFrank Ridin' a Stutz Bearcat, Jim

    Yeah this sounds familiar. Changing into second while steering round a junction and keeping an eye on my mirrors was one that used to cause me a fair bit of stress, but you get to a point where you only really have to think 'second gear' and muscle memory does the rest.
     
  30. Spymaster

    Spymaster Cockney Wanker

    What's his first language?
     

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