1. butchersapron

    butchersapron blood on the walls

    Obv trying to keep things quiet, block circulation of info - here's a list of where things still happening.

    That link is mad pro-dictator shit taffboy. Hilariously, Jodi Dean joined that party.
     
  2. teqniq

    teqniq DisMembered



    Some of the replies may may be of interest too.
     
  3. terapija

    terapija Well-Known Member

    too much pressure is being put on ordinary people by this globalisation process ... basic stuff like housing and even food in some places are the main issue here

    well have to go through another global wave of socialism sooner or later ...this neoliberalism is just shit on every level
     
    vanya, seventh bullet and Badgers like this.
  4. phillm

    phillm Trolling through Life (TM)

  5. elbows

    elbows WoeTimer

    Pickman's model likes this.
  6. teqniq

    teqniq DisMembered

    To which someone on Twitter observed that to anyone who knows Iranians this will have guaranteed that they all ensure their kids are taught English at home.
     
    likesfish likes this.
  7. teqniq

    teqniq DisMembered

  8. camouflage

    camouflage perspective is the essence of wisdom.

  9. camouflage

    camouflage perspective is the essence of wisdom.

    Interesting interview with Muhammed Sahimi on the situation in Iran from a few days ago.

    http://dissentradio.com/radio/18_01_03_sahimi.mp3

    yes it's a libertarian podcast, no i'm not a libertarian, yes it's a good interview- and I'm very interested to know what anyone thinks about what Mo Sahimi sez about the issue.
     
  10. butchersapron

    butchersapron blood on the walls

    Smokeandsteam, Riklet, teqniq and 3 others like this.
  11. elbows

    elbows WoeTimer

    Excellent, thanks for the great and informative read.

    Obviously there are many omissions and lack of analysis in mainstream articles but the extent to which many of the themes are in tune with the really good stuff has been reasonably impressive compared to the utter gulf we often get. Take for example this article which is 5 days or so old now but gives a brief glimpse of the economic situation in Doroud and at least vaguely touches some of the other bases that excellent article you linked to covers properly.

    Iran's working class, facing dim prospects, fuels unrest
     
  12. elbows

    elbows WoeTimer

    One of the links mentioned in the middle of that document was a real interesting read too. An old article about riots in the 1990's and the scale of squatting, migration to cities and informal communities in Iran. https://openaccess.leidenuniv.nl/bitstream/handle/1887/9782/12_606_019.pdf
     
  13. butchersapron

    butchersapron blood on the walls

    Yes - the author of that piece did a couple of really good books on same topic(s)

    Street Politics: Poor People's Movements in Iran (not a great copy)

    Life as Politics: How Ordinary People Change the Middle East

    And a larger one on the Arab Spring (Revolution Without Revolutionaries) that's just come out and so haven't yet read.
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2018
    Mordi, Riklet and Pickman's model like this.
  14. butchersapron

    butchersapron blood on the walls

    Some Kevan Harris stuff. He had a very interesting interview on Jacobin Radio a few days back in which he covered a lot of ground in a little time.

    1) The areas where the recent protests happened have usually seen labour protests in the last few years - he has been compiling data on this as part of his UCLA job/research - and that this is part of a wider increase in countrywide industrial disputes. They don't seem to have released the database publicly yet.

    2) That the austerity budgets (whether as a direct result of the IMF or not) are not actually examples of neo-liberalism but rather of attempts to technocratically modernise the state - simply put, the central state does not know or have control over the economy, over things it is supposed to own/control/tax etc - so moves to shut down on polycracy or examples of sectoral autonomy. He has some interesting stats on the growth of semi-state ownership of businesses - even outside of the usual military (see Egypt) areas that tie in with this.

    3) Allied with this (and this is well accepted generally) is the attempts to draw in foreign - mainly European - capital. Which isn't happening - even those sectors with state guaranteed high profits are being shunned due to potential instability down the road. (I find this sort of undermines the argument that what's happening doesn't constitute neo-liberalism as the grounds on which capital will/are entering are being sweetened exactly by the austerity budgets along classical neo-liberal grounds).

    4) There is potentially a regional anti-Tehran side to the protests and not just using Tehran as a shorthand for the theocracy and economic elites but in terms of all the recent advances on growth have gone there. In a sense, the 2009 protests were middle class reactions to the modernisation efforts at that point - those outside Tehran were left alone, until now - so this is the same process 10 years down the line.

    5) Some interesting stuff in this report he did on Voter Behavior and Political Mobilization in Iran (full pdf) that shows things like those poorest are most likely to take part in political activity.

    edit: he's alson on the board of MERIP who today finally have a piece out on recent stuff in Iran - not read it yet.
     
    Riklet likes this.
  15. teqniq

    teqniq DisMembered

    Things seems to be hotting up again:







     
  16. teqniq

    teqniq DisMembered

  17. teqniq

    teqniq DisMembered

    Reports stated to appear on twitter in the past few days of the security forces using live rounds against protesters and these have just been posted, looks pretty grim:



     
  18. butchersapron

    butchersapron blood on the walls

    This is related to a particular sufi group - they've killed 5 plod (think they were hit by a car) so are going to fully get it now.
     
  19. teqniq

    teqniq DisMembered

    this probably the same thing?

     
  20. butchersapron

    butchersapron blood on the walls

    I think it pretty much has to be yes.
     
  21. teqniq

    teqniq DisMembered

    I don't know whether this is wishful thinking on the part of the tweetee (is that even a word?) but protests are continuing. I think the interesting thing and what makes these protests different from the green movement that preceded it is that there a lot of disenchanted workers involved who see Iran's foreign adventures as an unnecessary drain on resources particularly when as it says they haven't been paid in months.

     
  22. butchersapron

    butchersapron blood on the walls

    This is worth a read

    Iran: sedition, revolt, revolution and social disintegration

    The contradiction between the state and its political regime has reached fever pitch. Who will replace the “supreme leader” has a direct effect on how the capitalist system can resolve the current crisis and survive. During Ahmadinejad’s presidency – that is, more than a deacde ago – the World Bank estimated that Iran needed at least 700 billion dollars in foreign loans or investments, just for its current projects. This sum is probably now well over a trillion dollars. In its most optimistic projections, Rouhani’s government has forecast for 60 billion dollars of foreign investment annually. In reality it has so far not achieved anything above 5 billion dollars annually. This figure does not even match the flight of capital from Iran abroad. Of course if the nuclear deal holds the Europeans will certainly want to invest in Iran but will they be able to hold their line in the face of US sanctions remains to be seen.

    Iranian capitalism has only two solutions; either bring under control all the main financial resources of the state that are now under the caliphate of the supreme leader, and thereby force its various “foundations” to pay taxes … or multiply the foreign investments a hundredfold. Either of these is simply total fantasy. The first possibility would require the complete dismantling of the client caliphate state with its tens of millions of sponsored supporters – and there is more chance that Trump will give all his money to the poor than that anyone can make a mullah pay back what he owes. After all the recent protests that shook the regime to its foundations, one of the most abhorrent of the mullahs, the Friday Prayers leader in Tehran, Ayatollah Kazem Sedighi, even complained that the government is not devoting a greater part of its budget to the religious foundations.

    The second solution requires an unprecedented growth of foreign investment in Iran, which seems extremely unlikely, especially in the current unstable political situation. Trump has put the nuclear deal in limbo, which is really not very different in its effect on foreign investment to complete annulment. We can only expect a worsening of the crisis, i.e. an increase in poverty and unemployment. The recent upheavals proved that even a caliphate cannot suppress mass protests of such nature and scale. The next uprising will be even more co-ordinated and better organised
     
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  23. camouflage

    camouflage perspective is the essence of wisdom.

    Excellent. Have our boys at Cambridge Analytica or something intensify their efforts and don't forget to arrange more shipments of wahhabs and AKs from the Libya operation for when the country implodes. Sooon.
     
  24. teqniq

    teqniq DisMembered

    Have you actually read the linked article? Because if you had you would see it is written from a socialist perspective and conveys a detailed understanding of what's actually going on there and the history that has led up to this.
     
    NoXion likes this.
  25. elbows

    elbows WoeTimer

    Waste of time arguing with camouflage about such matters, the detail will seldom fit with his comic book version of the world.

    People seeking freedoms reduced to mere pawns in his eyes. Sacrificed and made irrelevant via a thought process that is not worlds away from the 'lives are expendable for the greater good' mentality of the powers that be that the likes of camouflage caricature so crudely.
     
    seventh bullet and teqniq like this.
  26. camouflage

    camouflage perspective is the essence of wisdom.

    Yes, the war must go on for as long as possible and for the greater good, make sure that's the narrative. I can see you've experience in the sort of thinking called for here, good man.
     
  27. teqniq

    teqniq DisMembered

    What ill-informed bullshit is this?
     
  28. camouflage

    camouflage perspective is the essence of wisdom.

    Well I know there's not a war in Iran yet, duh. Be patient.
     
  29. teqniq

    teqniq DisMembered

    Like I said, ill informed. I have no desire to see a war in or with Iran either. Read the article eh? You might learn something.
     
  30. seventh bullet

    seventh bullet red mullet

    Give it a rest, space cadet.
     
    teqniq likes this.

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