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Honeytrap - groundbreaking Brixton film about gang culture goes for crowdfunding

Discussion in 'Brixton' started by editor, Mar 8, 2013.

  1. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    This looks to be a fantastic project.




    More: http://www.brixtonbuzz.com/2013/03/...rspective-launches-its-crowdfunding-campaign/
     
    thriller likes this.
  2. Rushy

    Rushy AKA some / certain posters

    Am I imagining it or does this sounds awfully like a horrible story in the news a couple of years ago?
     
    Kid_Eternity, IC3D, oryx and 2 others like this.
  3. Mrs Magpie

    Mrs Magpie On a bit of break...

    Yup, my first thought too. There was already a BBC (iirc) film made based on that case. So what makes this one 'groundbreaking' then?
     
    Pickman's model likes this.
  4. joustmaster

    joustmaster offcumdun

    needs more danny dyer
     
  5. Rushy

    Rushy AKA some / certain posters

    I posted before watching the trailer. She says it is based on a real local story. That's dark.
     
  6. Monkeygrinder's Organ

    Monkeygrinder's Organ Dodgy geezer swilling vapid lager

    Yes - the TV programme was called 'My Murder' iirc.
     
  7. trabuquera

    trabuquera Modesty Bag

    the 'My Murder' programme was really not bad, either. However it didn't put the girl's character centre stage (so I think that's what the reference is about in the crowdsourcing plea). I hope they do a good job of it.
     
  8. Rushy

    Rushy AKA some / certain posters

    What I don't get is that this seems to be ultimately a commercial project. The aim is to film, sell and distribute. Investment is being sought from industry financiers. Support from crowdsourcers is supposed to help reassure them that their investments will pay off.




    Films are risky investments at the best of times and although this one sounds like a strong story the subject matter probably makes it riskier than most. So, of course, anyone investing in this kind of film knows that they are pretty unlikely to see their money again. They will almost certainly have other reasons why they are investing - such as the community training, supporting the arts, etc... But if it does happen to be financially successful despite its low budget, why is there no equity share for crowdsourcers? How much will the producers and industry financiers own?

    Am I missing something?
     
    spliff likes this.
  9. Citizen66

    Citizen66 splash the cistern

    What's 'groundbreaking' about it? lol

    The use of untrained actors?
     
    Pickman's model likes this.
  10. spanglechick

    spanglechick High Empress of Dressing Up

    Yeah, I have to say I'm pretty tired of films about young people in London being about gangs and crime. It's lazy and I see nothing ground-breaking about this.

    The my murder dramatisation was intelligently done, whereas the description above makes this sound like a romanticisation of a very nasty, seedy motivation for a genuinely horrible crime.

    Crowd sourcing is popular for independent films, but tbh, in my opinion there's little artistic, social or moral justification for this to be made. Invest in indie film making by all means, though. There is some genuinely groundbreaking stuff.
     
    RaverDrew, kalibuzz, oryx and 2 others like this.
  11. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    If you watch the film trailer she mentions that, as does the BrixtonBuzz article.
     
  12. Pickman's model

    Pickman's model Starry Wisdom

    Is 'crowdsourcing' hipster-speak for 'begging'?
     
    RaverDrew and cuppa tee like this.
  13. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    Have you actually watched the trailer?
     
  14. el-ahrairah

    el-ahrairah forward communism, forward gerbils!

    yep.
     
    Pickman's model likes this.
  15. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    If you like yes. Or maybe it's just a way to get interesting films funded that would normally be ignored by the profit-driven majors.
     
  16. spanglechick

    spanglechick High Empress of Dressing Up

    Yes, I actually have.
     
  17. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    So you don't think the fact that the movie is based on a female perspective on gang culture or the mentoring that will accompany the filming marks it out as a bit different from your usual 'boring' gang film?
     
  18. Pickman's model

    Pickman's model Starry Wisdom

    There are interesting films which are worth supporting and there are interesting films which are attempting to make money out of other people's misery. This seems to be the latter, and they can get by without a donation from me.
     
  19. spanglechick

    spanglechick High Empress of Dressing Up

    No. I get four or five emails a year from indie producers looking for teenaged black girls to be in films about gang culture. The topic is very popular with low-budget film makers. Some of these come with details about mentoring schemes, and although not every film gets made, some do and there have been mentoring schemes before. Is it ground-breaking that the central character is female? No more than the perenial 'Macbeth from Lady macbeth's perspective' student projects are.

    It would be a lot braver, more groundbreaking and remarkable if this was a story about south London kids that wasn't about gangs at all.
     
    tar1984, ymu, RaverDrew and 14 others like this.
  20. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    Well, I've got time for both the project and Rebecca Johnson and I think it's good to see local kids getting involved and having an opportunity to learn about film production. I also think the storyline has a refreshing twist to the usual gang stuff, which I also normally find extremely boring.

    Like it or not, gangs do play a big part in the culture around here.
     
  21. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    I don't think that's either the intention or the case.
     
  22. spanglechick

    spanglechick High Empress of Dressing Up

    But what proportion of kids do you think are involved in gangs?

    As opposed to - say - what proportion of the kids are involved in extra curricular sport? Or as opposed to the proportion of kids that attend church? (not my bag, but it's huge in our local culture). Or as opposed to the number who are into music? Or just doing all the normal "white" teenager film fodder like falling in love and having arguments with their friends and parents and trying to fit in at school.
     
    UnderAnOpenSky, tar1984, ymu and 11 others like this.
  23. Citizen66

    Citizen66 splash the cistern

    Doesn't it serve to perpetuate stereotypes if young black people are just in films about gang violence? Plus glorifying the violence?
     
    Pickman's model likes this.
  24. Citizen66

    Citizen66 splash the cistern

    It's about as ground breaking as tomato ketchup.
     
    RaverDrew likes this.
  25. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    But films generally aren't all about reflecting the everyday. If you don't like the sound of this film that's fair enough, but I'm not going to slag it off without even seeing it because I think there are far more positives to this venture than most.
     
  26. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    Where does it "glorify the violence"?
     
  27. Citizen66

    Citizen66 splash the cistern

    By turning a nasty crime into a glamorous film production.
     
  28. Rushy

    Rushy AKA some / certain posters

    That sounds like a good idea. Let's talk...
     
  29. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    Where does the "glamorous" bit come from, exactly? Why do you keep making up stuff?
     
  30. MillwallShoes

    MillwallShoes Don't kill the Lion

    here here
    they do. especially if you have your own kids to raise amongst them. any hint of glamorisation of this problem and i'm out.
     

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