1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Hardcore Power Tool Porn

Discussion in 'suburban75' started by Firky, Mar 5, 2008.

  1. Crispy

    Crispy The following psytrance is baṉned: All

    good lord
     
  2. ringo

    ringo Macaroni cheese controller

    Ha, yes they go on forever :)
     
  3. High Voltage

    High Voltage Bring on t'dancing girls & put t'champagne on ice

    Bumpity, bumpity, bump bump bump

    Right chaps and chapesses - I "might" be in the market to replace my cheap 'n' cheerful, yet ancient B & Q Mac Allister cordless tool kit

    This consists of:-
    • Hammer drill
    • Nailer
    • Reciprocating saw
    • Torch
    • 2 x batteries
    • 1 x charger
    Now, it looks like I can get both batteries re-celled for "around" £100 give or take a bit but what I'd end up with would be an old cordless tool kit with new batteries - it could be argued that this is all I need as I'm hardly the DIY man about town

    But would this be throwing good money after bad . . . might it be worth springing for a new cordless kit, but with more relevant tools - the hammer drill is a must as far as I'm concerned - I don't think that I've ever used the nailer apart from the initial "I wonder what this does" . . . PaChing . . . PaChing . . . PaChing . . . "Oo! that's useful" and promptly NEVER used it again

    I like the idea of a saw, not necessarily circular, a reciprocating would do . . . I 'spose <sulk>

    What about these "multi-cutter" do-dahs? Any good?

    And which brand - having had a look back through this thread I don't think the Makita 500 x recharge cycles'll be much of a problem - but it is a bit naughty

    And budget - I absolutely know that it's not going to be cheap like the B & Q thingy, but I felt that, even I, got value for money from it - but looking at ScrewFix, I realise that "going North" of £500 won't be difficult - Hmmm! what to do, what to do
     
  4. izz

    izz life's too short to be normal

    Well, why don't you plan out all the jobs you're likely to use it for over the next few years and buy accordingly ?
     
  5. danski

    danski Comfortable chair.

    Would depend on the volume and type of work to a degree. Obviously day in day out usage needs high capacity batteries and pro tools whereas occasional DIY usage not so much.
    A lot of Pro brands do lower voltage ranges with tools that are as good as their full size counterparts but are physically smaller and with lower capacity batteries which means they can't do as much but are definitely competent and better than DIY brands.

    Bosch do a 10.8v range, Milwaukee 12v, Makita 10.8v.

    I have quite a few items in the Bosch range and always have at least one spare of their GSR drill driver. I cannot live without them now :oops:

    eta…and despite being smaller they complement my full grunt Milwaukee M18 stuff perfectly.
     
  6. sparkybird

    sparkybird ask the bird...

    the only cordless items I have are a hammer drill and screwgun (both Makita)
    The rest - jigsaw, SDS drill (both Bosch) and Fein Multimaster are corded - rare you need to work without any power, just use a long extension reel if you need to

    Have to a say that Makita's customer service is second to none. They have repaired both of mine free of charge even though they are way out of warranty. just had to pay the post to get them there
     
  7. Yuwipi Woman

    Yuwipi Woman Whack-A-Mole Queen

    My find at the pawn shop today:

    [​IMG]

    $40. Dremel 4000 with flex shaft, toolbox, and assorted accessories.
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2017
  8. petee

    petee i'm spartacus

    brands: makita? milwaukee? ryobi? dewalt? any others? does anyone have preferences and reasons?
     
  9. Cid

    Cid Degenerate Scum

    You want to get Festool everything. Because they're German.
     
    danski likes this.
  10. Crispy

    Crispy The following psytrance is baṉned: All

    Depends how much heavy use they're going to get. No need for a high-end brand if you're just doing a bit of home DIY.
    milwaukee, ryobi and AEG are all the same HK company underneath btw.

    We have a mix of HItachi, Dewalt and Makita tools at makerspace. The Dewalt and Makita stuff seems most robust and adherents of both tend to be rather religious about it. I can't tell the difference.
     
    petee likes this.
  11. beesonthewhatnow

    beesonthewhatnow going deaf for a living

    Makita for me, whoever designs the grips for their drills/impact drivers has hands closer in shape to mine than whoever does that job at DeWalt :)
     
    Yuwipi Woman and petee like this.
  12. Yuwipi Woman

    Yuwipi Woman Whack-A-Mole Queen

    I find this to be very important. One of the handicaps in being a woman who uses tools, isn't anything that you'd think it would be. Its not an issue of strength or coordination. The major issue I've had with tools is that they aren't designed for my hand. I've actually found DeWalt fits my hand fairly well, so whoever designs their tools much have small hands. I have an impact driver from them that gets lots of use.
     
  13. petee

    petee i'm spartacus

    thx for these responses.

    don't think they're much available here in the states, at least i haven't seen them at home depot/lowe's.

    which is what i'd be using them for.
    i'm in the market for a cordless drill, mostly for pesky screws, and was stopped by how expensive they are: $200 - $450. so i'm doing some homework now (i thought i'd be walking out of the store with one).

    right, will make a note. i have a few ryobi things, they're okay but i'm not wedded to the brand.
     
  14. Crispy

    Crispy The following psytrance is baṉned: All

    Then honestly just buy the cheap rebranded chinese one from Home Depot or wherever. DeWalt and Makita are expensive because they're for people who use them day in day out in their job. The parts are made with more expensive materials and processes because they're going to take a beating. Your home use probably won't add up to more than a couple of days in a "pro" environment so you can happily get away with cheap tools. My plug-in drill at home cost £25 and I've had it for 15 years with no complaints.
     
    petee likes this.
  15. Cid

    Cid Degenerate Scum

    You'll be able to buy them somewhere, but they're professional tools really and will be too expensive. It was a sort of in-joke thing.
     
    petee likes this.
  16. beesonthewhatnow

    beesonthewhatnow going deaf for a living

    To an certain extent. Just don't buy cheap drills/screwdriver bits to use with the drill.

    And when it comes to non power tools, never buy cheap. Shitty screwdrivers/Allen keys etc are the work of the devil. Buy as good as you possibly can and they'll last a lifetime and actually remove screws and bolts rather than making you cry in frustration.
     
  17. danski

    danski Comfortable chair.

    Amen to that.
    Would like twice if I could.
     
  18. petee

    petee i'm spartacus

    yyyup. my last screwdriver cost a bit, nice thick rubberized handle gives a good grip, stout stem, love it (stanley).
    it ratchets both ways, which is very useful, but i wonder, from an engineering point of view, if that creates a point of weakness. it hasn't failed me, anyway.
     
  19. beesonthewhatnow

    beesonthewhatnow going deaf for a living

    I have a big set of Facom screwdrivers. They will outlast me on this earth.
     
    danski likes this.
  20. petee

    petee i'm spartacus

    and from today's NYT ...

    5 Cheap(ish) Things That Could Disproportionately Improve Your Life

     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2017 at 5:36 AM

Share This Page