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Flickr best 25 photos of 2019

weltweit

Well-Known Member
At least 6 of them are so horrendously cheesy that the people responsible for them should be banned from ever uploading anything to the internet ever again (unless it is a written apology).
I like cheesy though, as it seems do a lot of Flickr users.

I still don't understand how they were chosen as so many comments have been negative.
 

FridgeMagnet

Administrator
There's nothing intrinsically worse about Flickr users than anyone else, but any "best photos" list that's decided by engagement metrics over a large group of people is going to tend towards the bland, just by statistics. Recommendation algorithms make this worse by introducing a feedback loop - regardless of their tastes, people are much more likely to engage with photos they _see_, that's kind of unavoidable. It isn't just a modern problem either - consensus has preferred blandness for centuries.

On the other hand, it's no good leaving judgement to an elite of Proper Photo Appreciators either, they can be completely hidebound themselves and ignore emerging trends.

Flickr is running a "best photos" competition, which _is_ judged by specific humans afaik, and it will be interesting to see what that comes up with in comparison to this.
 

FridgeMagnet

Administrator
Flickr just announced the winners of their "your best shot 2019" competition, which was based around user submissions. Out of the five winners, four were CGI-looking landscapes.


One interesting aspect of this is that you can look through the submission pool to see what users thought was their best shot. I'd say the majority of submissions were in that category.


I think there's something wrong with the online photography world personally.
 

weltweit

Well-Known Member
Well I like the photos in the first link that you share there, my main evaluation method is to ask the question would I be happy to have made this photo myself. And in most of the cases on the first link I would have been.
 

FridgeMagnet

Administrator
Online photography or digital photography? Because these images could have been made with film, don't you think?
The online photography world specifically, because that's where people look at pictures now. It's not the cameras or the existence of any particular tools that's the problem. (There's a lot there that I think you would have great trouble doing with traditional photo processes but that isn't the point.)
 

weltweit

Well-Known Member
The online photography world specifically, because that's where people look at pictures now. It's not the cameras or the existence of any particular tools that's the problem. (There's a lot there that I think you would have great trouble doing with traditional photo processes but that isn't the point.)
It seems these photos were judged by Flickr staff members. Rather than the general public, or photographers in general. Do you think this has a bearing on your feelings about the photos?

I recently went to a show which was promoted as a landscape photography masterclass. For the people who described it as such it might have been, but for me the photos were quite weak. There were some other photographers there who were also underwhelmed.
 

FridgeMagnet

Administrator
It seems these photos were judged by Flickr staff members. Rather than the general public, or photographers in general. Do you think this has a bearing on your feelings about the photos?

I recently went to a show which was promoted as a landscape photography masterclass. For the people who described it as such it might have been, but for me the photos were quite weak. There were some other photographers there who were also underwhelmed.
The fact that this was all down to human selection - both by the candidates and by the judges - makes me more convinced that there is a problem with photography at the moment that can't be just put down to algorithms. Algorithms will intensify it by making popular pictures more visible, so people view those, so they're more popular etc etc, but it's not the sole cause.

I don't like the current fashion in landscapes and I don't like the landscapes that are in that contest. The second one is the one I really hate the most actually. It's hugely stylised for the trendy "long exposure" look where large chunks of the frame are blurry, uses a superwide lens (also trendy), the composition is irritating (the right hand side of the tree is way too close to the mountain for a start) and it just gains nothing from having been taken at a particular place and time, which apparently it was. It means nothing. You could easily make a nicer and more pleasing shot in Blender. There is no reason to travel to Patagonia to take that photo.
 

weltweit

Well-Known Member
I like the Patagonia picture, I like the green of the weather-beaten trees, the blue of the lake, the mist on the lake, the mountains and the dramatic clouds in the sky. The bottom right of the image is not so interesting to me.

But I also like the running of the bulls, as an action shot it seems to capture a moment. I like that.
 

petee

i'm spartacus
i like Big Industrial so I'm the audience for the aircraft carrier picture but the obvious lighting treatment and the patriotic drivel in the caption ruined it.

i like the second owl pic tho'. that's a superb owl.
 

weltweit

Well-Known Member
I don't find it problematic that these particular images are popular. In the way they are all polished in that there has been significant post work done in Photoshop. But that is today's photography it isn't enough what comes out of the camera it has to be tweaked and teased while the photographer seeks their balance.

I follow quite a lot of amateur photographers online, they range from absolute beginner to experienced. I notice if they are skilled both with the camera and Photoshop I tend to appreciate their pictures more. In fact a couple of photographers I particularly like are professional graphic designers. However using their Photoshop skills does mean that their photos tend towards fantasy.
 
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