Eire Óg - A Rebel I Came documentary

Discussion in 'music, bands, clubs & festies' started by Fallon, Mar 23, 2019.

  1. Fallon

    Fallon Well-Known Member

    An excellent documentary that I watched this week about an 'Irish Rebel' band who released a very popular CD of political songs and played in Glasgow in the late 90s.

     
    Ax^, Rebelda, LiamO and 2 others like this.
  2. Micro

    Micro Out of my box

    No.

    From what I can see, they were a bunch of ‘up the ra’ wannabe rebels who tried to pour as much piss on the peace process as they could.

    Spoke to an entire generation? Did they fuck.
     
  3. Fallon

    Fallon Well-Known Member

    From your reply, I'll assume you haven't watched the documentary and know nothing about the band or scene in which they came from.
     
  4. Micro

    Micro Out of my box

    No, I haven’t, but only because I need subtitles and the ones on it are crap.

    There’s very little about them online but last.fm has a few track names, including one called ‘stick your decommission up your ass’ and mentions that the singer is an Irish republican.

    I put two and two together. If I’m wrong and they’re a parody act or something, then my bad.
     
  5. Pickman's model

    Pickman's model Starry Wisdom

    Whatever happened to the auld provo promise not a bullet not an ounce? Stick your decommission up your arse is a provo thing, not a dissident one
     
  6. Fallon

    Fallon Well-Known Member

    Far from a parody act. Irish rebel (republican) music was/is an important part of Glasgow Irish working class culture. The documentary is a good insight into a band that popularised it.
    Last.fm isn't a good source for information about it.
     
    marty21, Pickman's model and Ax^ like this.
  7. Micro

    Micro Out of my box

    Don’t get me wrong, I love me a proper old rebel song. But these guys were writing new material in the 90s ffs.

    There’s little to no audience for this stuff in Ireland, except maybe skanger teenagers. I get the Glasgow thing, but from an Irish perspective; kind of a weird one. Politically, it’s in the fucking Stone Age.
     
  8. Micro

    Micro Out of my box

    There’s fuck all else.
     
  9. Pickman's model

    Pickman's model Starry Wisdom

    The irish brigade and spirit of freedom wrote new stuff in the 90s
     
  10. Fallon

    Fallon Well-Known Member

    The album was recorded not long after the PIRA bombed Manchester so I've no idea why you take issue with a band singing rebel songs in the 90s.

    I couod give examples of audiences for it in Ireland and beyond but I think they'll be lost on you.
     
    Pickman's model likes this.
  11. Fallon

    Fallon Well-Known Member

    A reason why there is a documentary on You Tube now.
     
    Pickman's model likes this.
  12. LiamO

    LiamO Well-Known Member


    Really?

    D4 and The Indy would be proud of you. Did you type that one-handed, whilst holding your nose?
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2019
  13. Micro

    Micro Out of my box

    For most people in Ireland, singing rebel songs didn’t mean cheering on the bombings of the 80s and 90s. It was more of a romantic hark back to the old days.
    I think in the uk there’s a misconception that the general Irish public were in support of the bombings and broke into renditions of Ye Black and Tans every time one went off. It just wasn’t like that back then, and now it’s even less so.

    Oh, go on then. Let’s hear your examples.

    Er, no. Far, far from it. There’s loads of little skangers round here. ;)
    Did that make you feel better though? Like you have your finger on the nation’s pulse?

    Look:
    The old songs - yes.
    This relatively new stuff, and the whole ‘up the ra’ thing - barstool diehards and teenagers. It’s sad and pathetic.

    Like I said, I get that there’s a market for this music and the slogans in parts of the uk. Whatever floats your boat and makes you feel more Irish, I guess. :thumbs:
     
  14. Pickman's model

    Pickman's model Starry Wisdom

    i struggle to think offhand of a rebel song about bombings of the 1980s or 90s (e2a: there is of course the irish brigade's 'downing street' about the mortar bomb attack in 1991). but i can think of dozens of songs about the hungerstrikes, the loughall massacre, jail breaks, snipers. there's a new book out next week, a broad church, about the provos in the 26 cos 1969-1980, i think it'll be an interesting read as the blurb suggests there was rather more sympathy for them than has traditionally been said to be the case, and i suspect a sequel about support for the 'ra from 1981 on would find a well of support which while not perhaps cheering on every single bomb (they'd have been hoarse ffs) might not have been as critical as you suggest. i don't imagine that anyone singing 'back home in derry' or any of the numerous songs about the hungerstrikes would have been in any way perturbed by the 1984 brighton bomb, even if others didn't necessarily meet with whole-hearted and full-throated support.
     
  15. Micro

    Micro Out of my box

    I think I was responding to this:

    New music being written and performed in the 90s that implicitly supported the current action of the bombers. Just because the songs weren’t called ‘Canary Wharf, hohoho’...

    The climate had changed. How this stuff would be on anyone’s playlist now is beyond me.
     
  16. Pickman's model

    Pickman's model Starry Wisdom

    your argument is a diversion, just because 'the foggy dew' is not 'warrington' and 'take it down from the mast' is not 'camden town' or 'bishopsgate' or 'hyde park bandstand' playing those songs in the 1990s was very much 'up the 'ra' especially as they'd often be combined in a set with 'joe mcdonnell' or 'roll of honour'
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2019
  17. Micro

    Micro Out of my box

    For a minority, yes, there was still support for it. What I’m saying is that by then, for the majority in the south, it had become more about romanticising the past than supporting the present.

    There was very little support in the republic by that time for what the ira had become.
     
  18. Pickman's model

    Pickman's model Starry Wisdom

    tbh i would be very surprised if you could produce your actual majority in favour of eg the 1798 rebellion, 1848, 1867, 1916, 1919-21, 1939-40, 1956-62, 1969-gfa
     
  19. Micro

    Micro Out of my box

    Different, and I think you know it. If you’re going back as far as vinegar hill, the bombing of civilian targets is a very new thing, in a very different society.
     
  20. Pickman's model

    Pickman's model Starry Wisdom

    have you ever read about 1798? it's not all vinegar hill and lord edward and castlebar races, there's the killing of quakers and iirc other protestants. not to mention pitch caps and so on from the british army.
     
  21. krtek a houby

    krtek a houby Share knowledge, don't weaponize it

    Still, I'd be wary of using the word "skanger", its the Irish equivalent of "chav"...
     
  22. Micro

    Micro Out of my box

    Yes, I have. It was part of the school curriculum and I’ve read up about it a bit since. But it was a very different society and political landscape, no? Not really worth comparing the supports, or lack of.
     
  23. Pickman's model

    Pickman's model Starry Wisdom

    i am making the point that there has never been majority support (throughout ireland; i accept that at times in certain locales this may have been different) for an irish rebellion. this shouldn't be controversial. so your 'majority support' in the 1980s and 1990s isn't something which anyone's really arguing for.
     
  24. Micro

    Micro Out of my box

    Sure. But I think yourself and Fallon may not get just how minor that minority was in the 90s, because it’s miniscule now.
    Can’t wait to hear Fallon’s details of ‘examples of audiences’ in Ireland for bands like Eire Og, now and then.
    His assumption that I must be living in Sandymount to have these opinions says it all really.
     
  25. krtek a houby

    krtek a houby Share knowledge, don't weaponize it

    Brazen Head's a bit of a tourist trap, iirc. Maybe the audience is for those Americans who believe they're Irish...
     
  26. Fallon

    Fallon Well-Known Member

    Brazen Head in Glasgow is different to the tourist pub in Dublin.
     
    Pickman's model likes this.
  27. Pickman's model

    Pickman's model Starry Wisdom

    the various 'live ats' i've heard are from places like the barrowlands, brazen head and of course the wolfe tone bar in letterkenny
     
  28. krtek a houby

    krtek a houby Share knowledge, don't weaponize it

    Ah, my bad
     
  29. Micro

    Micro Out of my box

    Any sign of those ‘examples of audiences’ in Ireland yet?
     
  30. Fallon

    Fallon Well-Known Member

    Sure. Féile an Phobail, a festival organised by the community in West Belfast for over 30 years.
    2018 - 10k people pack into a sold out concert on the Falls Park to see the Wolfe Tones and three other rebel bands play. Made newspapers at the time due to some of the songs played, chants etc.
    That a good enough example or will all those in attendance be dismissed as 'scangers' as well?
     

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