Cream - any good?

Discussion in 'music, bands, clubs & festies' started by ska invita, Jul 27, 2016.

  1. ska invita

    ska invita back on the other side

    Just looking into their post Cream activtites - Jack Bruce had some solo albums - any good?

    But this I have to check out!
    [​IMG]
     
  2. ska invita

    ska invita back on the other side

    Yeah there was a similar acceleration from say 90 to at least 94 in UK dance music - every six months had its own sound - really relate to that 60s acceleration via that experience of rave blowing up
     
  3. ska invita

    ska invita back on the other side

    this is great :thumbs: never even heard of Delaney and Bonnie
     
  4. littleseb

    littleseb littleseb

    well worth checking out.
    Delaney's solo albums after divorcing bonnie were sublime.
     
  5. littleseb

    littleseb littleseb

    I guess whenever there is a new movement musos get excited and push it into all sorts of directions. see also the late 6ts / early 7ts JA scene...
     
  6. ska invita

    ska invita back on the other side

    Ginger plays on Let's Start? Fair play.... IM not sure tbh - cant find accurate track listing info ...sounds a lot like Tony Allen to me

    Yeah i reckon there needs to be a perfect storm of new music technology, new drugs, and a dose of social change...and enough people into it all to give it critical mass...doesnt happen often!
     
    littleseb likes this.
  7. ska invita

    ska invita back on the other side

    This is definitely Ginger cos it gets more than a little rocky on the drums! love it!
     
  8. danny la rouge

    danny la rouge Without music, life would be a mistake.

    That's great.
     
  9. ska invita

    ska invita back on the other side

  10. littleseb

    littleseb littleseb

    The best thing about Blind Faith is Steve Winwood. Other than that they bore me a bit 5 minutes in.
    Derek and the Dominos is a bit to Claptoned out for my taste, but has some merit in its own way.
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2016
    ska invita and blossie33 like this.
  11. Athos

    Athos Well-Known Member

    I have that LP, and it's fucking awesome.
     
  12. Athos

    Athos Well-Known Member

    Baker Gurvitz (sp?) Army
     
    littleseb likes this.
  13. littleseb

    littleseb littleseb

    and John Mayall's Blues Breakers (Clapo and Bruce) and Manfred Mann (Bruce).
     
  14. littleseb

    littleseb littleseb

    should be in the cod thread, but let's park it here for now

     
    ska invita likes this.
  15. SpookyFrank

    SpookyFrank If it's alive, don't lick it.

    Ginger Baker also turns up on 'Album' by P.I.L.
     
  16. ska invita

    ska invita back on the other side

    :thumbs: liking this too
     
    danny la rouge likes this.
  17. ska invita

    ska invita back on the other side

    Theres definitely a jazz edge to Ginger...

    "An athletic child, Baker began playing drums at about 15 years old. In the early 1960s he took lessons from Phil Seamen, one of the leading British jazz drummers of the post-war era. He gained early fame as a member of the Graham Bond Organisation with future Cream bandmate Jack Bruce. The Graham Bond Organisation was an R&B/blues group with strong jazz leanings."

    THe earliest entry in his discography is playing with The Storyville JAzzmen (trad jazz act i think)
     
    danny la rouge likes this.
  18. danny la rouge

    danny la rouge Without music, life would be a mistake.

    Talking about their post Cream work, Bruce's Theme for an Imaginary Western is a great song by anyone's standards.

     
  19. ska invita

    ska invita back on the other side

    I mentioned Art Blakey as a possible original founder of mad drum solo work outs, and this just popped up in my youtube feed:


    comment below says:
    Ginger idolized Art. This was probably the moment of a lifetime for Ginger. I love the way they interpreted each others statements and answered in kind. There is some real heavy communication going on here. Too many drummers work on having great hands which is important but great hands means nothing without great ears. I love both of these guys so the "winner" here is me and anyone else who gets to listen to this...

    I also found this comment from Ginger:
    "“There’s a great thing I did with Art Blakey in 1972, it was completely unrehearsed. It started off as a drum battle and ended up with us both going on to play exactly the same thing at exactly the same time and it just took off. We played together through to the end, complementing each other. It was a great experience. "
     
    danny la rouge likes this.
  20. ska invita

    ska invita back on the other side

    Didnt realise Cream predated JH Experience (by a year)..... seems they really were ground breakers for this sound yeah? were they the first acid rock blues band?
     
  21. danny la rouge

    danny la rouge Without music, life would be a mistake.

    Cheers ska invita , I've been surfing around looking at Cream stuff on the net!

    I've come across a quote from Jack Bruce saying that Cream were "a jazz band, but Ginger and I never told Eric". That kind of agrees with what I was saying before about the harmonic structures that Bruce brought in with his writing and playing, over which Clapton hammers the minor and major pentatonics. (So you get Bruce suggesting several chords, like a ii V I, over which a jazz guitarist would probably play a dorian, a mixolydian then a major seventh arpeggio based pattern, but Clapton treats it as one chord, the I. This creates interesting tension, but keeps it sounding like rock rather than jazz-rock).
     
  22. ska invita

    ska invita back on the other side

    Having checked a bit out I think I agree.... (though Derek and the Dominos - Live at the Fillmore is growing on me as it plays on...though his soling is a bit exhausting)
    I think for my tastes of the three of them Gingers projects were by far the most interesting. Definitely going to give his documentary a watch

    This is great - version of Jimis Freedom -
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2016
  23. ViolentPanda

    ViolentPanda Hardly getting over it.

    I went to an Albert Collins gig at the Town & Country about 25 years ago, where Bruce came and sat in the whole gig on bass. It was interesting in a good way. :)
     
    danny la rouge likes this.
  24. Lurdan

    Lurdan old wave

    I'd agree with most of that. (Not sure what you mean by 'acid-head whimsy'. If you mean the rather precious musical arrangements on some of the studio tracks I wouldn't demur. If you're referring to Pete Brown's lyrics they are very much from the pre-psychedelic Beat influenced 'jazz and poetry' school. Not suggesting that means you have to like them :) )

    Bruce and Baker had both come from a modern jazz (hard bop) background before following Graham Bond into Soul Jazz/R&B territory. There's a really interesting live hard bop set by the Graham Bond Quartet from 1963 (Bond on alto with Bruce, Baker and John McLaughlin) which sadly seems to have been removed from youtube. In 1968 Bruce recorded a straight post-bop jazz album with McLaughlin, Jon Hiseman and Dick Heckstall-Smith. It only got released in 1970, to the bafflement of Cream fans, when McLaughlin and Bruce were both playing with Tony Williams Lifetime.



    I think Bruce's song writing goes somewhat beyond his Jazz and R&B influences. It was also fairly influential - distinct echoes can be heard in a lot of groups at the start of the 70s. Here for example is Blodwyn Pig



    Cream were significant at the time for reasons that went beyond their music. Although they put out singles they were primarily an albums and live band, something which broke with the established mould for groups up to that point. And they became treated as musical stars/vituoso's, to an extent which wasn't fully justified. They were all very skilled musicians but none of them was a Hendrix. But in a kind of 'Melody Maker'-ish way they were given the sort of status previously reserved for some jazz musicians. In all of that they pointed the way forward to a way of being a group and of being a 'superstar' musician which was more characteristic of what came after them. (Some aspects of that legacy being pretty dreadful).

    I listened to the start of that live in Oakland recording before I got a little bored. Clapton's playing does nothing for me - if I wanted some mainstream 'British Blues Boom' it would be Peter Green. And Baker's drumming just seems very heavy handed and over-demonstrative. Rather agree with the way Elvin Jones put it in 1970

    [​IMG]
     
    danny la rouge and ska invita like this.
  25. ska invita

    ska invita back on the other side

    He definitely not a drummers drummer, but he plays with a lot of heart, energy and attitude (and is at least brought up in that more complex jazz drumming culture, even if he cant pull it off with the finese of the best jazz drummers), partly why i can see he gets the credit for inventing heavy metal drumming. And looking at this later proejcts you can see he rocked on...attitude trumps skill in music in my book

    Hearing him on record is one thing, but seeing him in action is a whole other
     
  26. danny la rouge

    danny la rouge Without music, life would be a mistake.

    This sort of thing:

     
    bimble likes this.
  27. danny la rouge

    danny la rouge Without music, life would be a mistake.

    There are far better places to find that sort of thing, for example:

     
  28. danny la rouge

    danny la rouge Without music, life would be a mistake.

    On closer inspection, most of the songs I don't like are written by Ginger Baker.

    I'm now considering buying a Graham Bond Quartet EP I've never heard. (I'm assuming it's Solid Bond [Warners WS 3001]). So thanks for that Lurdan :grr:

    (Not that I haven't heard Graham Bond, just not this EP).
     
    ska invita likes this.
  29. Lurdan

    Lurdan old wave

    heh heh - yeah the vocal starts out a bit more Donovan than ISB :) Strong touch of Blue Jay Way as well. Haven't listened to it in years, which I guess tells me something, however I can imagine listening to it more often than Toad for example. Some of the ideas re-occur in the better known Rope Ladder to the Moon.

     
  30. danny la rouge

    danny la rouge Without music, life would be a mistake.

    Forced to choose, I'd be with you there. In fact, I've already heard Toad quite enough for one lifetime. (Which, funnily enough, holds true even for people who've never heard it).
     
    Lurdan likes this.

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice