Craft club topic of the month - knitting!

Discussion in 'suburban75' started by RubyToogood, Jan 24, 2005.

  1. moose

    moose like some cat from Japan

    Ah, it's more of a double knit. I'll keep looking.
     
    Shirl likes this.
  2. Shirl

    Shirl Brexit my arse

    I don't have to use the wool I have, I can buy something else and white's not especially practical or flattering so I could knit something else with that wool. What would I be looking for to knit that one.
     
  3. wayward bob

    wayward bob i ate all your bees

    i have cold feet. i may have bitten off more than i can chew :hmm:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    in green :thumbs:
    [​IMG]
     
    Lupa, RubyToogood, Siouxsie and 4 others like this.
  4. Siouxsie

    Siouxsie Fashionable objector with a uniform fetish

    They are lovely, I like the detail on the calf.
    Is the pattern available online, wayward bob
     
  5. wayward bob

    wayward bob i ate all your bees

    Last edited: Sep 13, 2017
    Siouxsie likes this.
  6. Siouxsie

    Siouxsie Fashionable objector with a uniform fetish

    Thank you :)
     
  7. Biddlybee

    Biddlybee making knots with sticks

    So I'm thinking of picking up a project I put down in 2013 :oops:

    It's a top down cardi and iirc (stuck under baby so can't check) I've only just got to the shoulders... with a bit of recalculating (for my bingo wings biceps) it should be ok to carry on eh?

    If it doesn't fit on the shoulders and needs ripping back, will the wool be too set in that pattern too reuse? Iykwim?
     
  8. wayward bob

    wayward bob i ate all your bees

    Biddlybee it might be a bit kinky to work but i reckon blocking should mostly sort it out. is it stocking stitch? the main problem it get with reworking is the twist coming loose - but much more so with rib than a plain knit.

    socks are progressing, i'm onto the second leg. sat with it watching documentaries on wicca (kid1 is very interested atm) and thinking about greebo :) i don't think she was a huge knitter? but i was waxing lyrical to mr b about the structural beauty of the pattern, the elegance of the shaping, and i thought she'd really have appreciated that. her interest and support - along with teh whole crafty urb massive - are fundamental in my work (/sanity) life taking the turn it has :cool:
     
    Biddlybee likes this.
  9. RubyToogood

    RubyToogood can't remember what goes here

    I believe the thing to do is reskein it (ie just wind it round something and tie loosely) and wash or steam it to get the kinks out. I've never done this but I've heard of it.
     
    Biddlybee likes this.
  10. catinthehat

    catinthehat Failed VK = Replicant

    I cannot knit but have just witnessed what constitutes a miracle in my eyes - mates Mama (92) knitted a peysa (Icelandic wool sweater) on one needle, with no pattern in three days. Is this within the norms of knitting or should I ring Roy Castle?
     
    Shirl likes this.
  11. Biddlybee

    Biddlybee making knots with sticks

    How the fuck do you knit on one needle? :eek: :hmm:
     
    Siouxsie and wayward bob like this.
  12. Biddlybee

    Biddlybee making knots with sticks

    Cheers, I think it's stocking stitch :oops: will check maybe tomorrow.
     
  13. RubyToogood

    RubyToogood can't remember what goes here

    Do you mean a single straight needle, or a circular needle, ie a cable with a knitting tip at both ends? If the latter, this is pretty normal although not something you saw in this country when I was growing up. The without a pattern bit is fairly impressive, but if you spend your life knitting basically the same jumper over and over (albeit in different sizes), and are doing it in one piece, which you would be with a circular needle, it's understandable as there's a formula. The three days bit you've got me with because it takes me three months unless it was a baby jumper. Although Icelandic wool is quite thick so a bit quicker than some.
     
  14. wayward bob

    wayward bob i ate all your bees

    heh i was puzzled - circ makes sense :) i wonder how long they've been common in the uk? after wrestling with dpns for so long i still can't get over how (relatively) quick/easy socks go on a circ :cool:
     
  15. catinthehat

    catinthehat Failed VK = Replicant

    I think not circular as such but one long flexible needle that looks circular when in use. Its knitted in a single piece. I did ask her how many she had knitted and she said more than the leaves on a tree - so I would put that at around 'a lot'. She has been knitted since she was three she said. But then this is a woman whose sofa and chairs were made by her husband and covered in tapestry she made herself. I think its where the saying broke the mold is apt! Knitting seems much more common here - you see guys knitting on the bus.
     
  16. wayward bob

    wayward bob i ate all your bees

    i've always wanted to be able to knit one-handed. iirc scottish knitters used to keep the left-hand needle tucked into clothing or a belt and do all the manipulation with the right hand.

    does mama knit "continental" style, with the yarn in the left hand? i think it can be much quicker than throwing the yarn with the right. when i was learning i tried both ways, but throwing always felt more natural...
     
  17. RubyToogood

    RubyToogood can't remember what goes here

    That's a circular needle. As you say, it enables you to knit the thing in one piece with no seams because you're knitting round in a spiral. I think traditional Icelandic jumpers probably are quite formulaic, so after you'd done a few you could dispense with a pattern, just doing a bit of maths to work out how many stitches to cast on. For the yoke you would increase (add stitches) according to a formula eg every three stitches on every second row until you get down to the arms, then the rest is just tubes and a bit of ribbing at the bottom. And some imagination for the colourwork.
     
    catinthehat likes this.
  18. Biddlybee

    Biddlybee making knots with sticks

    Tried the part-cardi on... fitted nicely on the shoulders and arm holes were ok too.

    But moths had got at it :( :mad: and the other balls of wool.
     
  19. campanula

    campanula plant a seed

    Yep, it's that time of year again.file:///C:/Users/user/Downloads/TransverseCard.pdf
    Easing back into it with a mindless cardi knit for DiL.

    As usual - fucked up links (dimwit alert).
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Sep 25, 2017
  20. wayward bob

    wayward bob i ate all your bees

    fuck moths :mad:
     
  21. Me76

    Me76 Not very good lurker

    Oh no! :(
     
  22. Biddlybee

    Biddlybee making knots with sticks

    I'm beyond pissed off. Although I know it's my fault for leaving it undisturbed for so long. It's a really boring knit, but I want the cardigan dammit!

    I've put three balls in the freezer, but will probably buy the whole lot again so it's the same dye lot :facepalm: luckily not expensive yarn.

    Completely paranoid about my stash now though and on my list to go through it, if clingy ill baby lets me!
     
  23. campanula

    campanula plant a seed

    How did you get on with the moths Biddlybee?
    November comes around just as the garden is going over and knitting fever kicks in (although there is no shortage of work in the gardens). Also, a bit skint so am having a massive Xmas knit surge. 3 pairs of gloves, 2 doe caps (a Jenny Gordon pattern off Ravelry although I am winging it as it is not a freebie), and a fairisle beret. All great for stash using and I bought some Drops alpaca in their sale and a few balls of gorgeous, but ridiculously fine Rowan kidsilk haze I have had for years. First glove almost done over an evening (but I expect this maniac rate to slow down). A weekend in the wood means hours of knitting (dark at 3.30 and 8hours till bedtime... - perfect for those oldie style crafts such as quilting, embroidery (with a headtorch) and knitting.
    I also like doing fine colourwork with tiny needles and 2-3ply Shetland wool but never, in a million years, would I manage a cardigan or jumper...but hats and gloves are just right. I tend not to do socks though as they never last that long and are hidden under my workboots. How are you doing, wayward bob? I would never manage those socks (I am a bit crap at textured knitting - can just about manage moss stitch and a (very) straightforward cable.
    So, anyone else doing giftie knitting this year?
     
    Biddlybee and Me76 like this.
  24. Me76

    Me76 Not very good lurker

    Im really selfish in my knitting. I want to do it all for me. I'm not sure I like anyone enough to spend the time doing it for, and trust them to appreciate it enough.

    Even the OH is out at the moment as last year he didn't wear the jumper I knitted for him the year before at all.
     
    campanula and RubyToogood like this.
  25. Biddlybee

    Biddlybee making knots with sticks

    Baby things are so quick to knit and gloves too that it doesn't feel like as much of a investment of time as a jumper.

    Nothing else was got at campanula :thumbs: I've still not restarted the cardigan though as I'm knitting jumpers for my girls, or I will be once I can get the gauge right! Post pics of your projects when you get the chance :)
     
    campanula likes this.
  26. campanula

    campanula plant a seed

    The swine!

    erm, it wasn't a Xmas jumper with reindeer or penguins was it?
     
  27. Me76

    Me76 Not very good lurker

    It wasn't. He did like it, apparently. But it was very warm and last winter wasn't that warm.

    IMG_2843.JPG
     
  28. innit

    innit c'mon, little life giver

    I'm making a blanket for my daughter for Christmas (that's crochet though :hmm: )
    and am just casting on a little faroese fair isle jumper for my son which is a longer term project. I have to say that casting on 126 stitches in rib has reminded me what I love about crochet...
     
    Me76 likes this.
  29. campanula

    campanula plant a seed

    :eek:
    Is that one side only or in the round? I recall one endless moss stitch jumper and now avoid complicated patterns...although I am not keen on garter stitch either. I find stripes or fairisle easier than plain stocking stitch...because it is so encouraging seeing each row and pattern completed.
    I only got around to crochet last year, innit...and only granny squares at that. After 94 of them, I almost lost the will to live...and found the hundreds of end threads a nightmare to weave in so just knotted a lot of them...which now keep poking through to the other side of the seat cover.
    That is a really nice jumper, Me 76. Set in sleeves makes it harder for you to 'borrow' (which I do with sweetheart's jumpers). Raglan sleeves though.
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2017
    Me76 likes this.
  30. innit

    innit c'mon, little life giver

    It's in the round so the worst is well and truly done now*, but I prefer crochet now for lots of reasons really, although I'm still quite inexperienced compared with my knitting skills. Crochet feels so much more portable and less vulnerable, without reams of stitches on the needles to take care of, and it's easier to rewind and fix things.

    I crocheted the baby some little slippers with no seams (about 4 stitches to whip stitch at the end) which are so fabulously 3 dimensional. I love working with fibre :cool: She can kick them off in under a minute though :mad:

    *I may revise this opinion when I come to cast on the sleeves on dpns
     

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