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Clapham, Stockwell and Kennington news, rumour and general chat

BusLanes

Pedestrian
Popped along to the festival today for a couple of hours. It was pleasantly chilled out and the weather held up.

I did accidentally order a pizza with vegan cheese but it was actually pretty good, so well done to the cheese maker.
 

GarveyLives

Well-Known Member
A bit speechless at this horrible event.....

Inside garden where Kenyan Airlines stowaway fell 3,500ft on way into Heathrow

"Neighbours said the sunbather was lucky not to be killed."

....but somebody was :(
Is it possible that the neighbours concerned do not consider the dead African to be "somebody", or that if they do, he is deserving of the manner of his death and whatever led to it?

I guess that we would have to hear from the neighbours involved for clarification.
 

BusLanes

Pedestrian
Please report back!
Is Lembit representing the Lib Dems or Russia Today?
So I went with a friend who lives nearby. I've spent a bit of time in the area and whilst I don't live there now I do like to keep an eye on stuff.

It was an interesting event, somehow they'd found a donor who'd paid for the hotel to host us and feed/water us, which is a big help with public events for turnout anyway. The crowd were quite mixed - lots of parents with young kids, which was nice - although a bit noisy during the speeches.

Steve Chalke was running things, as you'd expect. He's good at this kind of event, can raz the crowd up and all that. He then had a succession of speakers, both locals (a couple of local mums) and various campaigners, including a local retired fireman/FBU organiser, Flo Elomoshi MLA, Mohammad Seedat (Streatham Wells Ward) - latter there as a cabinet member. Flo did attack the mayor's plans quite strongly, tbf. Then of course, Lembit. He spoke for a while about the business case/costings. He's actually pretty good at this kind of event - much better at holding the audience than the others, but then he was an MP for a long time so he should be. He was there as a local, he lives down the road and he's also a parishioner of Steve's so he was there in that capacity, not as a Lib Dem. There were several there though, but didn't speak.

The argument basically being that Oasis running the site as a community hub has a better chance of helping the community reduce incidence of crime and so that should be factored into the decision by the mayor. Lembit's talk was in large part about this - what the cost saving could be if crime was reduced.

Operationally, Oasis seems to have it in hand. They're organised and have a plan. They have a proposal, they're doing a letter campaign, they have local politicians on board, they have a petition and they've got the group delivering appropriate leaflet.

Personally, whilst I was impressed, I still feel I need to know more about Oasis itself before I would get properly involved.
 

CH1

"Red Guard"(NLYL)
So I went with a friend who lives nearby. I've spent a bit of time in the area and whilst I don't live there now I do like to keep an eye on stuff.

It was an interesting event, somehow they'd found a donor who'd paid for the hotel to host us and feed/water us, which is a big help with public events for turnout anyway. The crowd were quite mixed - lots of parents with young kids, which was nice - although a bit noisy during the speeches.

Steve Chalke was running things, as you'd expect. He's good at this kind of event, can raz the crowd up and all that. He then had a succession of speakers, both locals (a couple of local mums) and various campaigners, including a local retired fireman/FBU organiser, Flo Elomoshi MLA, Mohammad Seedat (Streatham Wells Ward) - latter there as a cabinet member. Flo did attack the mayor's plans quite strongly, tbf. Then of course, Lembit. He spoke for a while about the business case/costings. He's actually pretty good at this kind of event - much better at holding the audience than the others, but then he was an MP for a long time so he should be. He was there as a local, he lives down the road and he's also a parishioner of Steve's so he was there in that capacity, not as a Lib Dem. There were several there though, but didn't speak.

The argument basically being that Oasis running the site as a community hub has a better chance of helping the community reduce incidence of crime and so that should be factored into the decision by the mayor. Lembit's talk was in large part about this - what the cost saving could be if crime was reduced.

Operationally, Oasis seems to have it in hand. They're organised and have a plan. They have a proposal, they're doing a letter campaign, they have local politicians on board, they have a petition and they've got the group delivering appropriate leaflet.

Personally, whilst I was impressed, I still feel I need to know more about Oasis itself before I would get properly involved.
I would have loved to go, but well out of SC area. I still haven't fully grasped the purpose of this meeting. Was it some sort of anti-crime initiative involving extra policing - paid for by the community? If so study Cabinet papers for Monday the 15th July. There is a big paper in there about the council paying for extra police officers. (I thought we already paid in the Mayoral for policing??)

I would be interest to meet Steve Chalke. He is of the ultra-liberal wing of the evangelicals. He got chucked out of the Evangelical Alliance when he decided (or had it revealed to him) that gay marriage would be more acceptable in the sight of God than philandering in Kennington Park like Kevin Spacey.

IMHO there are far too many things called Oasis. And its nots clear which of them come under the auspices of Steve Chalke and which are independent. Its a bit like Mosaic. All sorts of things are called Mosaic - including Mosaic Clubhouse, but are not connected.

On the same issue look at this learned report on Outreach and Support in South London (OASIS) - re SLAM's schizophrenic customers (aged 14 - 35). Not sure if this SLAM OASIS still exists. The public would be the last to know.
 

Attachments

OvalhouseDB

Well-Known Member
The Kia Oval have opened the ground to welcome the winning team. Free entry (bag search) , local schools are all on the pitch , team members meeting the crowds, not sure what time it is going on until.
 

David Clapson

Infamous Knob
The above is a horrifying story which deserves everyone's attention. Just in case you are put off by the wonky pictures just posted, here's the Guardian story, which is currently on the front page:

Nearly 50 years after they were jailed for theft and assaulting the police in a highly controversial case in which they claimed to have been framed and beaten, four black men from south London could finally be cleared.

Winston Trew, Sterling Christie, George Griffiths and Constantine “Omar” Boucher were arrested in March 1972 after a group of undercover police officers confronted them at Oval underground station and aggressively accused them of “nicking handbags” on the tube. They were held overnight, beaten in the cells and charged with attempting to steal, theft, and assault of the police.

After a five-week trial at the Old Bailey, all four were convicted and jailed for two years in November 1972. At the time, mugging was a high-profile issue and routinely blamed on young black men.

Last year, after another case involving the corrupt officer who led the operation that resulted in a conviction being overturned last year, one of the “Oval Four” applied to the Criminal Cases Review Commission. It is now referring the convictions to the court of appeal. The CCRC only refers a small number of cases each year and submission is typically viewed as highly likely to result in success. “It has been a long time coming,” said Trew, now 69. “Finally we are getting justice.”

The campaign in support of the Oval Four after their conviction featured marches and meetings at Lambeth town hall in Brixton. Eventually they were granted an appeal at which they were represented by the distinguished barrister, John Platts-Mills QC. Their sentences were reduced but their convictions upheld. The appeal court judge, Lord Justice James, told them that he hoped they appreciated the “gravity” of their offences and would not see the small reduction of their sentences as a “sign of weakness”.

The detective sergeant who led the arrests was Derek Ridgewell, who had previously served with the Southern Rhodesian (now Zimbabwean) police. His practice, which led to many convictions, was to confront young black men at underground stations, accuse them of theft and then attribute incriminating remarks to them. If they resisted arrest, they were also accused of assaulting the police.

Along with the Oval Four, he also arrested those who became known as the Stockwell Six, the Waterloo Four and the Tottenham Court Road Two. It was during the last of these cases that the courts finally realised that something was amiss. The two young men arrested at Tottenham Court Road underground station in 1973 were devout Jesuit students from Oxford University and the judge, Gwyn Morris, halted their trial and said: “I find it terrible that here in London people using public transport should be pounced upon by police officers without a word.”

Ridgewell was quietly moved to a post investigating mail theft. He joined forces with a pair of career criminals with whom he split the proceeds from stolen mailbags before finally being arrested himself and jailed for seven years. Asked by the governor at Ford prison how he had become involved, his response was: “I just went bent.” At the age of 37, he suffered a heart attack in jail and died.

During his time on the mail theft squad, he used a similar arrest technique on three young white men who thought, when they were approached by the police in their car in south London, that it was merely because the music on their car radio was too loud. They soon found themselves charged with mailbag theft and being told by the duty solicitor that it would be inadvisable to accuse the police of lying when they came to court. They continued to protest in favour of their innocence but were all jailed in 1976.

One of their number, Stephen Simmons, who became a successful businessman, was always angered by his conviction, not least because his own parents did not believe the police would lie. A few years ago, he decided to investigate the case and came across the information that the man who had arrested him was himself a mailbag thief. He also found Trew’s book, Black for a Cause, which included his research on Ridgewell.

Adam Bell, a case worker for the CCRC, investigated the case and it was referred to the court of appeal. Simmons’s conviction was quashed last year. The lord chief justice, Lord Burnett, expressed regret that the case had taken so long to come back to court and said that the evidence before him was “extremely telling”.

After being cleared, Simmons, now 63, said: “That man Ridgewell ruined three lives for no reason and I am sure many, many more and if this can help someone else who was also arrested by him then at least something will have been achieved.”

This week he reacted to the news of Trew’s case, saying: “I am very happy to hear Winston’s news. The more the merrier.”

The CCRC said it had been a complex case to investigate. Helen Pitcher, CCRC chair, said: “The age of the case meant that almost all of the information that we usually have to go on – such as police material and prosecution and court files – had long ago been destroyed so we had to go to great lengths to piece things together.”

Trew paid tribute to his CCRC case worker, Anona Bisping, saying: “She did a fantastic job of pulling everything together.”

Trew, along with Christie, will now have their cases referred to the court of appeal. The other two left the UK many years ago and could not be contacted but their cases would also automatically be referred back if they were ever found.
They look like such nice guys...lives wrecked by a bent copper, who was later jailed and died in prison at the age of 37.

 

David Clapson

Infamous Knob
I saw it. Isn’t one of those Google mapping planes that regularly fly above night and day?
Go here and you can usually find out what it is: Flightradar24: Live Flight Tracker - Real-Time Flight Tracker Map Could have been one of the little planes which calibrates navigation aids or radio networks. They do endless circles and loops, quite low. Could be the Met police, who do surveillance flights they won't talk about. The Google Maps photos are mostly from satellites but they also use low flying planes, according to the internet. Google doesn't do many flights, it's far more likely to have been a calibration job.

If you do a Google Images search for Calibration Aircraft you can see the registrations of some of the small planes which do the job. Put them in the search box at flightradar and you can see where they've been during the last 7 days. Here's one which did a calibration flight over Dublin the other day G-GBAS - Diamond DA62 - Flight Calibration Services - Flightradar24
 

CH1

"Red Guard"(NLYL)
So what's the story? One of the assailants lunged at the deceased through an open window with his crutch.
The other assailant - who killed the deceased with three stabs of his blade - is claiming it was manslaughter.

Is this the type of manslaughter caused by failure to take one's anti=psychotic medication?
Or is it the type caused by a dispute over delivering non-NHS substances?

Or maybe it was pedestrian road rage? Driver failed to stop for jay-walkers?

I hope you will keep us posted.
 

GarveyLives

Well-Known Member
Is it possible that the neighbours concerned do not consider the dead African to be "somebody", or that if they do, he is deserving of the manner of his death and whatever led to it?

I guess that we would have to hear from the neighbours involved for clarification.

The Stowaway: Who was the man who fell from the sky?
 

GarveyLives

Well-Known Member
After 47 years, a local injustice moves one step closer to being rectified:

'Oval Four' could be cleared after 47 years in wake of corrupt officer case





Oval Four: Black men jailed after being framed by racist police officer have convictions quashed almost 50 years later



(Source: as stated in image)

Lord Burnett said it was “clear that these convictions are unsafe”, adding: “We would wish only to note our regret that it has taken so long for this injustice to be remedied.”​
 
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