Cassettes

Discussion in 'music, bands, clubs & festies' started by tbtommyb, May 21, 2014.

  1. ATOMIC SUPLEX

    ATOMIC SUPLEX Member Since: 1985 Post Count: 3

    Wut? Tapes faded away quicker than vinyl, in face vinyl is still here.

    Mostly bullshit. Technically vinyl and tape has the potential to be better than CD, but it mostly doesn't make a difference. Vinyl and tape also has the potential to be seven million times shitter than CD. CD is always CD.
     
  2. ATOMIC SUPLEX

    ATOMIC SUPLEX Member Since: 1985 Post Count: 3

    PS.
    I have always hated tapes. So annoying. Couldn't wait to see the back of them. Even 8 tracks were better/cooler.
     
  3. mwgdrwg

    mwgdrwg Be a Pisces. Jam. Enforced Holiday Banned

    Amerikka's Most Wanted was one of the first tapes I listened to again...amazing how good it sounded too. What an album that was at the time...like a punch to the face.
     
    ska invita likes this.
  4. ska invita

    ska invita back on the other side

    couldnt agree more - love the bit where gets the electric chair at the start
    yeah i got some last words - fuck all yall!

    full album up here - going to have a reminisce listen


    loads of bomb squad productions on that - PE energy as a result

    ETA: just listening now - still just as powerful
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2014
    mwgdrwg likes this.
  5. tbtommyb

    tbtommyb Well-Known Member

    yeah but it got pretty niche and still is. I mean when I was young (early 90s) all the music my parents had was on tape until CDs became more widespread. I missed the period when vinyl was the default medium on which to buy pop music. my parents aren't big music listeners though so maybe it was convenience for playing in the car or something.

    [/quote]
    Mostly bullshit. Technically vinyl and tape has the potential to be better than CD, but it mostly doesn't make a difference. Vinyl and tape also has the potential to be seven million times shitter than CD. CD is always CD.[/QUOTE]
    that's interesting, how does tape have the potential to be better?
     
  6. killer b

    killer b No Hateration, No Holeration. in this Dancery

    tonight I'm listening to this Zambian singer:

    [​IMG]

    he's great. It's highly unlikely I'd have ever heard him without buying a load of african pop albums for 10p each or something on cassette from a charity shop. :)

     
    littleseb and ska invita like this.
  7. ATOMIC SUPLEX

    ATOMIC SUPLEX Member Since: 1985 Post Count: 3

    I think it was just your parents, vinyl was always more popular than tape, and tape left mainstream record shops a long long time before vinyl did.
     
  8. killer b

    killer b No Hateration, No Holeration. in this Dancery

    that isn't true - most record shops were mainly selling CDs and tapes by the time I was 15 or so (1992) - there would sometimes be a small rack of vinyl, but outside of dance or indie rock specialists that had dissappeared by the mid 90s.
     
  9. ATOMIC SUPLEX

    ATOMIC SUPLEX Member Since: 1985 Post Count: 3

    Better quality, wider faster, no 20/20 cut off, not 16 bit 44.1k
    Don't forget most stuff used to be (and quite a lot still is) recorded and mastered to tape before being put on a CD.
    Even a domestic tape could be pretty decent quality on the right system and the right tape, despite the speed and width.
    Trouble was that record companies mostly produced shit low quality tapes. Same thing happened with vinyl. Thin floppy records that were not cut very deep.
     
  10. fishfinger

    fishfinger تپلی

    This is about right :thumbs:

    All-music-format-sales-chart.jpg
    From here

    Or this one:

    static_graph_tune_overtime.jpg

    From here
     
    Fozzie Bear likes this.
  11. rutabowa

    rutabowa YUPPIES OUT

    I think in the early 90s then in big chain music shops like Our Price, Woolworths(!) etc then CDs (and tapes) were dominant... but all towns, even small ones, also had smaller (but still quite mainstream, not niche) music shops dominated by vinyl (which have probably all closed down by now). I'm only going on my own experience here.
     
    Sweet FA likes this.
  12. Sweet FA

    Sweet FA ✪ Three rounds Lord, in my .44 ✪

    Yeh, that's my experience. Though I hung onto tapes for ages. I've never been an early adopter.
     
  13. rutabowa

    rutabowa YUPPIES OUT

    Wooloworths always had looads of tapes (for parents to listen to in the car)... but the local record shops hardly any. That would explain why cassette sales are high on that graph (as they were shifting volumes and volumes of Soft Rock Driving Anthems etc), but music fans remember more vinyl being sold.
     
  14. killer b

    killer b No Hateration, No Holeration. in this Dancery

    I'm a music fan. The only shop that sold any volume of vinyl by the early 90s was the indie & dance specialist (action records here). All the other shops (our price, hmv, andys, woolys, whsmiths) had minimal or no vinyl.
     
  15. fishfinger

    fishfinger تپلی

    You seem to be forgetting the personal stereo. Many more people were listening to music on the go. Not just the soft rock mainstream shite for dad's car ;). Most of the music I bought on cassette was hip-hop, house, techno, and other dance music.
     
    spanglechick likes this.
  16. rutabowa

    rutabowa YUPPIES OUT

    Yes that is what I was saying.
     
  17. rutabowa

    rutabowa YUPPIES OUT

    quite right i had forgotten... + tapes free with magazines, I bet they bump up the sales volumes a lot.
     
  18. Sweet FA

    Sweet FA ✪ Three rounds Lord, in my .44 ✪

    I was still buying cassettes in Japan/S.Korea in 2000/2001. The Our Price shops in Osaka/Seoul were still about 25% cassette racks.
     
  19. fishfinger

    fishfinger تپلی

    Surely, free tapes, records, or CDs don't count as sales, on account of being free. Also, cassettes were by far, the most expensive medium to manufacture music on. Both records and CDs were much cheaper to produce.
     
  20. rutabowa

    rutabowa YUPPIES OUT

    Umm this isn't true surely, where did you get that from!!
     
  21. killer b

    killer b No Hateration, No Holeration. in this Dancery

    'music fans' bought music from HMV, Our Price and the like too. Indie record shops served a tiny proportion of the music buying public.
     
  22. fishfinger

    fishfinger تپلی

    How many parts are there in a vinyl record vs the many moving parts in a cassette?
     
  23. rutabowa

    rutabowa YUPPIES OUT

    Agreed with everything except "tiny". I think "small" would be more correct in the early 90s; like in my small town any kid who was into music would spend part of saturday going to the local (vinyl dominated) record shop/hanging out outside the record shop. Whereas now there is no way that would happen, vinyl record shops are for people in their 20s/30s.
     
  24. rutabowa

    rutabowa YUPPIES OUT

    trust me, records are more expensive to produce than tapes.
     
  25. fishfinger

    fishfinger تپلی

    They are these days. I'm talking about when they were mainstream, not some niche market that they are now.
     
  26. rutabowa

    rutabowa YUPPIES OUT

    I'm pretty records always were more expensive to produce than cassette tapes. That's why you always got tapes free on the front of magazines, and never records!!
     
  27. fishfinger

    fishfinger تپلی

    This is crap reasoning :D
    Never heard of a flexi-disc? They were around long before any cassette was ever put on the cover of a magazine. The main reason that vinyl wasn't put on magazines is because it is too fragile. The cost of producing vinyl records was much cheaper than cassettes. As I'm sure you're aware vinyl is literally pressed out of a piece of plastic: BANG! another record, BANG! another record. You get the idea? Whereas a cassette has to be made from many parts before it even gets any music put on it. If a record pressing goes wrong, the vinyl can be recycled. Not so for cassette manufacturing. Albums on cassette always cost more than the vinyl version to cover the increase in manufacturing cost.
     
  28. rutabowa

    rutabowa YUPPIES OUT

    Setting aside any argument about the manufacturing details, which neither of us know the details of, the cassette versions were definitely cheaper shops! 99p for a cassette single, £1.99 for a 7".
     
  29. rutabowa

    rutabowa YUPPIES OUT

    At least they used to be in my local shop... in general.
     
  30. fishfinger

    fishfinger تپلی

    Unfortunately, I can't find info on the manufacturing costs from 25 years ago, but I can assure you that it was a lot cheaper to mass produce vinyl than it was cassettes. I accept that these days, the position has changed. As for singles, I haven't bought one since the early '80s, and that would have been on vinyl. I've never bought a cassette single.
     
    rutabowa likes this.

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