Brixton news, rumours and general chat: Summer - Autumn 2018

Discussion in 'Brixton' started by editor, Jun 21, 2018.

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  1. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

  2. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

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    How much is that bloody road repainting going to cost? Once again there was shitloads of workers/road closures/police last night to enable it.

    I'd love to know how the costs compared to earlier bridge repaintings....
     
    Gramsci likes this.
  3. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

  4. Tricky Skills

    Tricky Skills I demand tea - NOW!

    Here we go: [pdf]

    "The prize for the winning design will be a £10,000 fixed-fee commission.

    The cost of materials, installation will be met by the Council up to £20,000, alongside and access equipment, which is provided by the Council’s contractor."

    The Progress crowd at the Town Hall certainly do like dressing things up.
     
    Gramsci and editor like this.
  5. friendofdorothy

    friendofdorothy it is so much worse than Thatcherism now

    They were still outside the Macdonalds when I arrived in Brixton and I only managed to say solidarity to one of them before they all traipsed over the road and I had to run for my bus. What happened next?
     
    Gramsci likes this.
  6. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    If you're quick, there's an Amazon truck on Somerleyton Road selling the Echo gadget for thirty quid off.
     
  7. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    Oh for fuck's sake, there's what looks like a purple-clad rejig of those racist homophobic religious nutjobs who have decided cause a noisy obstruction on the pavement, surrounded by a handful of rather aggressive looking purple chums, all filming each other.
     
  8. Pickman's model

    Pickman's model Every man and every woman is a star

    Did you get one?
     
  9. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    Nope. They'd have to be free to get me interested.
     
    BoxRoom likes this.
  10. ash

    ash Inittogether

    I saw them too; they seemed to have minders standing at every corner looking menacing. I couldn’t really hear what they were staying as it was quite distorted just ‘scriptures’, ‘shalom’ and a lot of angry shouting. Tbh under the robes and looking at the faces most of them looked quite vulnerable not sharp and smart looking like the Nation of Islam lot.
    I wonder how they recruit!?
     
  11. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    It's now just a big shouting match. Last time I confronted their bigoted drivel I nearly got into a fight with one of the nutcases, so I'll just turn up my earphones. The good news is that their PA seems to have stopped working :D :D
     
    Gramsci likes this.
  12. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

  13. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    Here's those fucking muppets from last night:

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    Pickman's model and Gramsci like this.
  14. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

  15. littleseb

    littleseb littleseb

    ah them, we get them in Totts too. never fully got what they are about, but no really interested in finding out.
     
    Gramsci likes this.
  16. newbie

    newbie undisambiguated

    I don't often look at these threads, nor do BTL comments on Guardian articles. But I made an exception for this one and discovered you get moderated away for using words like 'gentrification', 'social cleansing', 'housing profit' and so on. :)
     
    Gramsci and editor like this.
  17. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    "Also, we love living in Brixton. It’s diverse, vibrant and busy"

    Always vibrant. Until the incomers with young children/very important jobs start complaining that the aforementioned vibrancy is impacting on their crucial lifestyle choices so they try to get the local vibrancy turned down to a level that suits them personally.
     
  18. Pickman's model

    Pickman's model Every man and every woman is a star

    if only you could get multipacks of crucifixes.
     
    Angellic likes this.
  19. newbie

    newbie undisambiguated

    Indeed. Perhaps I was too sarcastic in my use of 'vibrant' in the posts that got pulled :oops::(
     
    Gramsci, sealion and editor like this.
  20. Angellic

    Angellic Well-Known Member

    What do, or maybe did, people find most appealing about living in Brixton?
     
  21. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    Sense of community. The feeling that everyone was welcome and when people moved to Brixton they generally wanted to become part of it. Living somewhere that that wasn't being divided up on class and money lines. Living somewhere that wasn't being repackaged and sold as a 'destination' for cash-dripping hipsters, opportunity seeking entrepreneurs, profit-hungry developers and those keen to leech off the cultural cache of Brixton to further their own selfish financial ends. Etc etc.
     
    Gramsci, sealion and Angellic like this.
  22. Mr Retro

    Mr Retro Beware hedgehogs

    I suspect everybody will have a different answer. It depends when people moved and what their needs were at the time based on budget. Brixton appealed to us in early 2001 because it had relatively cheap rent and good transport links to centre of London, brilliant market and because it wasn’t Clapham where we had lived for 6 months and hated.
     
    alcopop and shakespearegirl like this.
  23. friendofdorothy

    friendofdorothy it is so much worse than Thatcherism now

    Apart from the transport and the streets of nice old houses, it was the way no gave a fuck in a tolerant sort of way. The area had a gay history - Railton rd, Gay Faeries and queer stuff at the Ritzy Fridge and Substation, and Pride was still held in Brockwell park. That there was a lot of creative types around here - writers/musicians/ designers etc - that helped too.
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2018
    Gramsci likes this.
  24. friendofdorothy

    friendofdorothy it is so much worse than Thatcherism now

    Really? wasn't it because you could get a hard-to-rent-flat here? surely the whole of London was always being 'being divided up on class and money lines'. Depending when you moved here Brixton, it used to be a cheaper zone 2 area, with a tube - that people could afford.
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2018
  25. molpol

    molpol New Member

    As one of those incomers (in 2008) with small children (as of 2016), I love Brixton for its spirit, complexity, and community vibe while still being in the thick of the city. As a lifelong Londoner, I wanted to be in a place that felt like real people, of all sorts, lived there (and that I could make work on a charity salary. Things I've never loved, children or no: anti-social arses of any class who think that booming bass music in areas of high density housing at 1am and heavy drug/alcohol use in shared spaces doth a community make (which isn't a uniquely Brixton characteristic either of course).

    Brixton has never been just one thing, I don't love it when people pretend that it ever was. There's been young people, families, blue and white collar workers, and hedonists here for as long as it's been around (approx 1820 after the bridges at this end of Thames opened) so we've all had to muddle along together this far, and that means everyone making compromises. I like a place that at least tries to do that, and Brixton manages better than most.
     
  26. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    Of course. But it's impossible to ignore the fact that there has been an immense demographic shift in the past 10-15 years that has fundamentally changed the character of the place, and made it less inclusive on account of soaring rents and rates.
     
  27. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    I came because I fucking loved the place (for the reasons stated) and was offered an affordable place in a friend's flat.
     
  28. organicpanda

    organicpanda cat herder extraodinaire

    I came to Brixton in the mid '80's knowing a few people in the squats and having a great time where it felt that it didn't matter where you came from but what type of person you were - non-racist and non-homophobic where important to me having seen too much of it elsewhere. The Albert was the first pub in Brixton I frequented and felt so at home there (the fact I probably spent more time there than at home might have something to do with it), I loved the music scene and the art scene, but the thing that most attracted me was the feeling that everyone was an outsider and this was our place and no twat was going to take that from us - how wrong I was.
     
  29. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    Still seems strange that they're allowed to have this green monstrosity near-permanently up every day.

    1.jpg
     
  30. editor

    editor Taffus Maximus

    When I arrived in Brixton I quickly got to know a large chunk of the community, many of whom were living in the squats opposite and in Railton Road. It was that kind of pub and if you hung around there for long enough it was easy to be invited to all the gigs, parties and events happening around town.

    Contrast that with now where I don't think I've met a single person who moved into Clifton Mansions and Rushcroft Road since they've been turned into swishy upmarket flats, and it's well documented how some new arrivals have gone to some length to try and close down long established venues in the area. The only person I ever met from Brixton Square was one who was complaining about the ugliness of the Barrier Block and wishing it would be demolished to make his view better.

    Remember when the Albert used to stay open till 3am? :(
     
    organicpanda likes this.
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