Brixton news, rumours and general chat: Spring 2019

Discussion in 'Brixton' started by editor, Mar 19, 2019.

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  1. editor

    editor hiraethified

    The cause is great but it's a real shame that the prices are so high because that will prevent many local people from getting involved. I don't see any reduced prices for those on low income/unemployed.

    And this is why I care:
     
    Gramsci and ShiftyBagLady like this.
  2. T & P

    T & P |-o-| (-o-) |-o-|

    You can post all the research you want. None of it that I have ever seen will give you any indication as to what poor people wish to do with whatever little money they have.

    Are you actually suggesting that poor people are never capable or wishing to treat themselves to something a little out of the ordinary? Really?
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2019
  3. editor

    editor hiraethified

    Clearly, I have said nothing of the sort but this constant excusing of unaffordable fun and trendy activities/restaurants/bars as being OK because they'll make up yet another of these seemingly unlimited 'occasional treats' is frankly painful to read. There's people on my estate using foodbanks. Wouldn't you rather these courses be offered at a rate that is not so far out of their grasp?

    And are you really OK with courses being set up in an area where many, many people are on benefits but there's no discounts available to these people?
     
    ShiftyBagLady likes this.
  4. T & P

    T & P |-o-| (-o-) |-o-|

    Unless you think the Brixton Pound Cafe have been ripped off, I would say such course is as cheap as you are ever going to find it anywhere for that kind of experience. Indeed, the fact that it is being held in the Brixton Pound Cafe will almost certainly have ensured it is cheaper than it would otherwise be.

    I am as okay or not okay with it as with the countless pubs, resturants, bars and other leisure businesses in the same area also offering wares that are just as out of reach to the poorest people in Brixton.
     
  5. editor

    editor hiraethified

    Oh, a politician's answer. :facepalm: But I get it. You've no problem with this place offering zero discount for the less well off because, err, leisure businesses.

    But I think most people can stretch to a half in a pub. You know, as an 'occasional treat.'
     
  6. T & P

    T & P |-o-| (-o-) |-o-|

    Believe me, my alleged skills at politician's answers pale in significance to your own, given your tactic of constantly shifting the argument from one question to another with every reply.

    Your initial observation was that the price of these courses were a bit pricey "for the Brixton Pound Cafe". I answered that point, but then you quickly swifted the argument to whether the price might exclude parts of the population, instead of either defending your initial point about the surroundings not being adequate. Then swiftly shifted the argument yet again to the issue of discounts for the well-off.

    Nah. My politican's skills have nothing on yours

    And yet, when I and others have suggested in this forum over the years that most people can stetch to marginally more pricey pint in a pub, all hell has broken loose. I'm sorry, but either we're all capable of claiming to know what is or isn't affordable for the poorest people in the area, or nobody is. Nobody but the individual person in question, that is.
     
  7. T & P

    T & P |-o-| (-o-) |-o-|

    And in actual fact, no, the poorest can’t even ‘stretch to a half’ in a pub since they struggle to put food on the table, and virtually have not a single penny of disposable income available to them. If you claim to reckon otherwise, please don’t criticise others for making their own assumptions as to what people can or cannot afford.
     
  8. editor

    editor hiraethified

    There's a fucking immense world of difference between a cheap half pint in places like the Beehive and the Prince Albert and the rip-off hipster craft ale places you're always defending.
     
  9. snowy_again

    snowy_again Slush

    It's a fundraiser? Therefore you aim it at your audience to give you cash, or influence. If you look on their site, anyone can volunteer and take part in their wider food / training activities and cook and eat together.
     
  10. editor

    editor hiraethified

    It's possible to have a fundraiser and not exclude those at the bottom from all the nice activities, you know.
     
  11. editor

    editor hiraethified

  12. snowy_again

    snowy_again Slush

    Well that's an obvious statement, but I'm not really sure what it adds to this conversation.
     
  13. editor

    editor hiraethified

    If people can't understand why a growing local landscape of unaffordable 'treats,' out of reach opportunities and expensive restaurants and bars is not a good thing for those who can't join in, then I'll just give up on it.
     
    Gramsci and ShiftyBagLady like this.
  14. snowy_again

    snowy_again Slush

    Again, that's got nothing to do with a fundraiser which was the question in hand.
     
  15. editor

    editor hiraethified

    Where is this particular event billed as a "fundraiser"?
     
  16. snowy_again

    snowy_again Slush

    It's probably not - calling things a "fundraiser" creates a different tone and affects what audiences do and how / whether they respond. Fundraising fatigue and all that, plus perpetuating a patriarchal approach.

    Having it as part of what you offer (ie. to engage with potential supporters directly with your client base through food) means you can continually raise funds to support your work.
     
  17. editor

    editor hiraethified

    That's all splendid but I still think it's crap that they don't offer any discount at all for the many, many locals on low income/benefits in the area. But if you're fine with that, that's grand.
     
  18. editor

    editor hiraethified

    2019-04-17_153337.jpg

    Here's Brixton Bid putting their funds to good use. We can never have enough slogans flapping from the lamposts of Brixton, can we?
     
    Nanker Phelge and Gramsci like this.
  19. CH1

    CH1 "Red Guard"(NLYL)

    And you can never have enough banality.
     
    Gramsci and editor like this.
  20. T & P

    T & P |-o-| (-o-) |-o-|

    No, there is no difference whatsoever within the context of someone very poor who might ocassionally afford a half pint. If someone can afford to spend £1.60 on a half pint in the Albert, they're also able to spend £2.40 in one in Pop. Is fucking ludicrous to suggest someone is extremely poor but could just about to stretch to spending £1.60 on a drink at a pub, but spending an extra 70p on said drink would tip them over the edge.

    The bottom line of course is that the overwhelming majority of people who are so poor they could only afford to spend less than £2 on a single drink in pub, would never choose to spend the money in a pub in the first place. And make no mistake that there are plenty of people who simply cannot afford a single drink in any pub no matter how cheap it seems to you.
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2019
  21. editor

    editor hiraethified

    What a silly argument.

    You can spend a LOT more on a half pint in Pop, even if standing in the cold and drinking from a plastic glass while surrounded by noisy young professionals is your thing. Doesn't sound much of a 'treat' to me compared to settling into a sofa in a warm pub, mind.
     
  22. rlw

    rlw New Member

  23. snowy_again

    snowy_again Slush


    By that logic you think it's splendid to hamper an attempt to support migrants, refugees and asylum seekers. But if you're fine with that, that's grand.
     
    discobastard and T & P like this.
  24. editor

    editor hiraethified

    That's quite the stupidest argument I've read here in quite a while. Well done.
     
  25. snowy_again

    snowy_again Slush

    Yes, you did surpass yourself this time.
     
  26. ShiftyBagLady

    ShiftyBagLady Thinks she is a flower to be looked at

    Isn't there something vaguely insulting about selling £40/head cookery lessons to the well off while operating in and supposedly supporting a community in food poverty? With no concessions...
    Anyway, I think that if they want to call themselves a Brixton community venture then they should make all of their events accessible to the community by assigning some free spaces and offering concessions.
     
    blameless77, Gramsci and editor like this.
  27. Ms T

    Ms T Honey-coloured ramparts

    Not when they're supporting and giving jobs to refugees, imho.
     
    Southlondon likes this.
  28. alex_

    alex_ Well-Known Member

  29. teuchter

    teuchter je suis teuchter

    Where are they calling themselves a 'Brixton Community Venture'?

    I don't see any claims that they are coming to Brixton to address food poverty issues here. Their purpose is to give support to migrants to the UK. Those migrants as far as I can see get paid a small amount for their work, and that money presumably comes from the income from the classes. The income presumably has to cover all of the other expenses such as hiring the spaces they use including the ones they use for training. There doesn't seem to be anyone coining it in in the background. They run the events all over London and they are aimed at people who are willing and able to pay for them. Such people exist in Brixton, so they run some events here.

    They are trying to help one group of people; why are people moaning that they are not simultaneously doing something to help another group of people? What other social issues should they address while they are here?
     
    Mr Retro and T & P like this.
  30. editor

    editor hiraethified

    So you think that offering one or two concession rates to unemployed locals would have some kind of meaningful overall negative impact on their mission?
     
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