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Brixton news, rumours and general chat - April 2018

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David Clapson

Infamous Knob
I've been on Quetiapine for several years, it's much better for me than the half dozen things I tried before. My pharmacist said it's been generally well received. But I still can't drink 2 pints without paying for it.
 
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CH1

"Red Guard"(NLYL)
The most bizarre thing I saw back in the day was the weight loss clinic at 308 Brixton Road. This was funded by the manufacturers of Olanzapine, a similar drug which also has a notorious side effect of make you feel incredibly hungry. I've been offered it myself, but give me Lithium anytime. Li not good for your teeth though.
 

David Clapson

Infamous Knob
If you were in train jumping mode (and survived) you may get appointment straight away.
IME the hospital you are first seen by and the hospital you get locked up in don't even write to your GP, let alone a specialist. So when you get out of the psych ward there is no follow-up. The whole episode doesn't even get into your GP's notes. I hope it's not usually that bad.
 

CH1

"Red Guard"(NLYL)
IME the hospital you are first seen by and the hospital you get locked up in don't even write to your GP, let alone a specialist. So when you get out of the psych ward there is no follow-up. The whole episode doesn't even get into your GP's notes. I hope it's not usually that bad.
There used to be a legal document - the "Discharge Certificate" which the doctor was sent. I've got 2 - one from Hospital for Tropical Diseases (1996) and one from Charter Hospital Lissom Grove (1997).

From Googling around it looks as though such a thing may no longer exist. Bring back Matron!
 

David Clapson

Infamous Knob
I wasn't sectioned, but I was told I would be if I didn't go voluntarily. So no legal paperwork. I think if you do get sectioned there's a minimum stay and a legal process to get released? I'm not sure and I don't really want to read about it. Better to think of a life of freedom on this sunny day. Those poor sods who are locked up in there are in the next worst thing to prison. It's supposed to be a safety net but I wouldn't let them put me in there again. As soon I realised what was what I began thinking of ways to start a fire so I could escape.
 

CH1

"Red Guard"(NLYL)
To come back to the Channel 4 film (about black men and psychosis) it is somewhat disappointing to me that a lot of the comments underneath the film on the C4 Youtube channel are essentially racist.
Looks like the youtube audience would rather engage with race than with psychosis, but see both as terms of abuse.
 

editor

hiraethified
Bottom part of the plinth is constantly getting damaged isn't it - hence the constant repairs.
You might have thought that they would have taken that into consideration given that there's been skateboarders in the square for decades. I'm not a fan of the design in the first place but now it looks even uglier.
 

CH1

"Red Guard"(NLYL)
Apologies for late notification. Maybe someone might like to pop into this. My understanding is that "openings" have refreshments - but possibly all quaffed by now!
Slippage.jpg
 

madolesance

Well-Known Member
You might have thought that they would have taken that into consideration given that there's been skateboarders in the square for decades. I'm not a fan of the design in the first place but now it looks even uglier.
Has Windrush Square been around for decades?
 

David Clapson

Infamous Knob
The FT has a gentrification/arches piece. By Judith Evans, published today. For some reason the Google News alert service gave me a link which goes through the paywall, but I'm unable to pass it on. Odd.

Afraz John Khan has run his hardware store, Brixton Tools, from a south London railway arch for more than 20 years. But this week he closed its doors for a final time. After returning the keys to his landlord, Network Rail, the 45-year-old will leave to start a new life in his native Trinidad. His departure, and those of a series of nearby traders, follows a three-year wrangle with the public sector infrastructure operator over plans to refurbish a group of arches in the centre of Brixton, a vibrant but historically underprivileged area known for black activism. “Brixton is home for me, but this has all been a big mess. I’m just trying to hang on to the good memories,” Mr Khan said. Network Rail presented the £8m project as a vital upgrade to the arches, but terminated tenants’ leases to clear them out for the redevelopment work, though it said they would be offered a chance to return. The plan sparked fierce opposition from traders and locals, who saw it as an attempt to introduce steep rent rises and oust longstanding tenants. A petition against the project gathered almost 30,000 signatures, while at the council meeting where it received planning permission, the rapper and activist Potent Whisper (whose real name is Georgie Stephanou) threw red glitter around the room to represent “the blood of Brixton”.

The controversy over Brixton’s arches is not just a local issue. Such battles are set to gather pace as Network Rail — the country’s largest landlord to small and medium sized businesses — seeks a buyer for a portfolio of properties worth more than £1bn that includes thousands of railway arches like these in England and Wales. Bidders include private equity groups such as Blackstone, along with institutional investors, such as a joint venture of Goldman Sachs and the Wellcome Trust, the health charity. Potential buyers will be looking to increase income from the properties, many of which are in London, analysts say. But such spaces have traditionally provided a cheap, if ramshackle, home for small businesses and start-ups, and local communities often react furiously when the landlord’s approach changes. A similar conflict has played out over the past two years in Hackney, another fast-gentrifying area of the capital, and they have previously erupted in Blackfriars and Bethnal Green. In Brixton, renovations announced three years ago have yet to begin, but much of the once-bustling area is covered with hoardings after several tenants accepted compensation and left in 2016. Those closing this week — including Brixton Tools — are the final holdouts who had hoped to take legal action against Network Rail, but after mediation also agreed to leave. Mr Stephanou said: “The Brixton arches have been the backbone of the community for almost a century. They are inextricably linked with Brixton’s cultural and social heritage. It’s not just about the tangible buildings — it’s the community itself they have evicted.” Opposition to Network Rail’s plans has been fuelled in part by rumour: some campaigners say the landlord wants to fill the arches with national chains, but although retail groups such as Sports Direct are arriving nearby, Network Rail maintains chains are “not appropriate” for the arches. It has reserved the right to veto subleases to them. Of more than 4,400 arches it lets out, it says fewer than 30 are leased directly to national chains. The plans to increase rents are not in dispute, however. Tenants in the Brixton arches had been paying “historic rents” averaging £21 per square foot per year, according to Network Rail. Post refurbishment the rail network plans to charge £26 per sq ft — a discount to 2015 market rates, it says — rising to £52 by the sixth year after the renovations. The increases for some arches amount to a tripling of the rent, said the Save Brixton Arches campaign. One tenant, who asked not to be named, said the rents he had been quoted would only be feasible for “Mr Posh Deli or Mr Organic Candle Factory”. The sense of betrayal is especially acute because many of these businesses were established before Brixton found favour with the middle classes. “When Brixton was bad, we were [seen as] good, but now Brixton is good, we’re the bad guys,” said Ray Murphy of Budget Carpets, another business about to vacate its arch. Gentrification has also affected business: Mr Murphy said the market for carpets had declined as twenty-something renters moved into the area, replacing social tenants and homeowners more likely to make long-term investments in their properties. Currently, said Network Rail, 10 of 21 original arch tenants plan to return — not including those who had sublet space — while just two took up the offer of temporary premises elsewhere. Tenants saying they will depart for good include a deli, a coffee shop and fishmonger.

Network Rail said: “We work hard to build strong relationships in the communities where we operate. In Brixton we have met regularly with the Brixton Bid [Business Improvement District], Brixton Society and others, including local politicians, to explain our intentions and work with them. We will continue to do so.” Across its portfolio, Network Rail said arches were “increasingly popular for a range of uses”, with traditional industrial operations joined by “breweries, cafés, theatres and boxing clubs”. James Watson, head of retail capital markets at the property consultancy Colliers, said investors were also eyeing Network Rail’s arches as potential warehousing for “last hour” deliveries of products ordered online. As customers lined up to say goodbye, Mr Khan pointed out how he had helped maintain the Victorian viaduct by pulling out plants that sprouted below the railway line. “I climbed up and pulled the bloody trees out,” he said. “I was here when it was all drugs and shootings and stabbings. I’ve seen the naughty little schoolboys grow up and become parents themselves,” he said. But after what he described as a “David and Goliath” fight, he decided: “That’s it for me. I’m off back to the Caribbean.”
 
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editor

hiraethified
Network Rail said: “We work hard to build strong relationships in the communities where we operate. In Brixton we have met regularly with the Brixton Bid [Business Improvement District], Brixton Society and others, including local politicians, to explain our intentions and work with them. We will continue to do so.
I don't expect much from the Brixton BID but have the Brixton Society been very vocal on this issue?
 

organicpanda

cat herder extraodinaire
I missed that. Has it just happened?
yep, somewhere between 50 and 100 (I'm worse than the police at guessing crowd numbers) guy with a megaphone doing the American marine style of chanting, and about 6 cars heading towards Atlantic Road, no banners to give the game away
 

editor

hiraethified
yep, somewhere between 50 and 100 (I'm worse than the police at guessing crowd numbers) guy with a megaphone doing the American marine style of chanting, and about 6 cars heading towards Atlantic Road, no banners to give the game away
From what I've gathered it's a response to the terrible death toll on the streets through the recent gang violence. So there's a whole load of topics, people and institutions to be angry at.

And big up them for staying out in this awful weather.
 

ash

Inittogether
yep, somewhere between 50 and 100 (I'm worse than the police at guessing crowd numbers) guy with a megaphone doing the American marine style of chanting, and about 6 cars heading towards Atlantic Road, no banners to give the game away
Might be the stop the violence march which went through Stockwell earlier - seemed to be passing through a lot of south London estates starting in Vauxhall from what I could see on social media.
 
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