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Beers available in Brixton - craft, ale, keg, cask, bottled, canned and more

CH1

"Red Guard"(NLYL)
Editor's note: The first posts in this thread have been moved from another discussion, hence the slightly strange start to this thread!

I got to the second paraaaaagrrrrrrrr.zzzzzzz
Re cans of luxury pale ale at £4 - I can't quite understand why anyone would want to can a good beer. Cans are the least satisfactory way of serving beer - except that they are highly portable and can be exported to Antarctica etc.

I don't know much about the technology of nitro canning but I can vouch for the fact that London Pride in its canned form is fucking vile. But I was drinking it on a BA flight to Lagos - so no alternative as the lady used to say.

Do you think 40 FT brewery have mortgaged their houses to buy a canning machine and are now locked in to this mode of production?

Or maybe they have seen how massively popular Wetherspoons Bengal offering in cans was - and want to cash in - but can't afford to put any alcohol in their derivative light ale?

I think we should be told.
 
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Re cans of luxury pale ale at £4 - I can't quite understand why anyone would want to can a good beer. Cans are the least satisfactory way of serving beer - except that they are highly portable and can be exported to Antarctica etc.

I don't know much about the technology of nitro canning but I can vouch for the fact that London Pride in its canned form is fucking vile. But I was drinking it on a BA flight to Lagos - so no alternative as the lady used to say.

Do you think 40 FT brewery have mortgaged their houses to buy a canning machine and are now locked in to this mode of production?

Or maybe they have seen how massively popular Wetherspoons Bengal offering in cans was - and want to cash in - but can't afford to put any alcohol in their derivative light ale?

I think we should be told.
This is a reasonable overview.

The rise of canned beer: anyone fancy a tinnie?
 
I have often had Adnams Ghost Ship as a hand-pulled ale at the Beehive.
Be interesting to do an A-B on it. Can't imagine a gassy canened version wold taste the same as the hand-pulled "real" variety though.
No I can't imagine it will. Though most craft beers, if you do see them on draught they tend to be keg rather than cask and so will be carbonated in any case, and probably won't taste much different.
 

CH1

"Red Guard"(NLYL)
Bottled Ghost Ship is nice.
On the matter of bottled beer (and trending off topic towards Lidl) I am just sampling their "La Blonde de Ch'Nord"
I wouldn't normally reckon to spend £2.49 on 75cL of beer in a wine bottle - but it is very nice and at 7% abv blows your head off!
I bet such a thing at Pop could triple the price.
Only gets a meagre 46 on Ratebeer mind
 

ViolentPanda

Hardly getting over it.
On the matter of bottled beer (and trending off topic towards Lidl) I am just sampling their "La Blonde de Ch'Nord"
I wouldn't normally reckon to spend £2.49 on 75cL of beer in a wine bottle - but it is very nice and at 7% abv blows your head off!
I bet such a thing at Pop could triple the price.
Only gets a meagre 46 on Ratebeer mind
I do like Bieres de Garde. Had a nice bottle of Biere de Sans Culottes a few weeks back (7%) which was gorgeous, and have a bottle of Ch'ti blonde awaiting sampling. Both were about a fiver a bottle though, not £2.49!
 

alfajobrob

Well-Known Member
I feel a bit John Lennon atm.

How about a thread we can ALL get together on and agree on with no bullshit. I'm sure if we all met in a pub it wouldn't be that bad and most would agree about a lot of different social points and issues. I'm even getting bored with this!

Have we got a Brixton etc. Ale, Beer, Cider thread and we can talk about the salient beer points raised above?
 

Twattor

Well-Known Member
Have we got a Brixton etc. Ale, Beer, Cider thread and we can talk about the salient beer points raised above?
Please create. Although if this forum is anything to go by I'm sure it will degenerate into hatred and fighting within 2 pages. I'll even start you off - I'm not keen on red beers.
 

alfajobrob

Well-Known Member
Please create. Although if this forum is anything to go by I'm sure it will degenerate into hatred and fighting within 2 pages. I'll even start you off - I'm not keen on red beers.
I have faith in the civility of posters - I like red beers, because they are not bitter.

I also like ipa's, apa's, honey etc. because it's not bitter either...it work's for the failing lager drinker.

I know nothing really about different ales etc....we do have some local now apparently but I'd like reviews and prices - supermarket, off licence deals if necessary...
 
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jezg

Well-Known Member
Do you think 40 FT brewery have mortgaged their houses to buy a canning machine and are now locked in to this mode of production?
AFAIK 40FT still use a mobile canning operator. They brew in a 40ft shipping container so no space for a canning line! Mobile canning vs in-house itself increases cost of beer quite significantly.
 

alfajobrob

Well-Known Member
AFAIK 40FT still use a mobile canning operator. They brew in a 40ft shipping container so no space for a canning line! Mobile canning vs in-house itself increases cost of beer quite significantly.
Is it any better than a Tyskie - What does it taste like?
 

CH1

"Red Guard"(NLYL)
AFAIK 40FT still use a mobile canning operator. They brew in a 40ft shipping container so no space for a canning line! Mobile canning vs in-house itself increases cost of beer quite significantly.
That's astounding. A whole technical subculture I was totally unaware of.
 

CH1

"Red Guard"(NLYL)
Is it any better than a Tyskie - What does it taste like?
Presumably it might be a bit like Devils Backbone - but the essential thing about these Craft beers is the very distinctive taste. Most canned lagers, including Tyskie, have such a bland taste that a rather refined palate is required to discern any difference (IMHO).
 

ViolentPanda

Hardly getting over it.
Re cans of luxury pale ale at £4 - I can't quite understand why anyone would want to can a good beer. Cans are the least satisfactory way of serving beer - except that they are highly portable and can be exported to Antarctica etc.

I don't know much about the technology of nitro canning but I can vouch for the fact that London Pride in its canned form is fucking vile. But I was drinking it on a BA flight to Lagos - so no alternative as the lady used to say.

Do you think 40 FT brewery have mortgaged their houses to buy a canning machine and are now locked in to this mode of production?

Or maybe they have seen how massively popular Wetherspoons Bengal offering in cans was - and want to cash in - but can't afford to put any alcohol in their derivative light ale?

I think we should be told.
Canning is cheaper and more convenient from a production point of view. You're dealing with a pasteurised liquid that doesn't "condition" (and thus have a small potential to spoil) in storage, and you have nothing like the breakage/failure rate that bottles experience. I can understand canned ales being popular, but they're only rarely going to live up to their draught and bottled stable-mates. There's a good reason that so few brewers in continental Europe primarily use cans - because it doesn't do their beers any favours, and they refuse to brew "for the can". Over here the big breweries spent 50 years brewing for their own convenience, so you got abominations like Watney Red Barrel, which tasted equally vile on tap and in a Party Seven, and tinned Double Diamond, which tasted nothing like it's draught brother.
 

ViolentPanda

Hardly getting over it.
I have faith in the civility of posters - I like red beers, because they are not bitter.

I also like ipa's, apa's, honey etc. because it's not bitter either...it work's for the failing lager drinker.

I know nothing really about different ales etc....we do have some local now apparently but I'd like reviews and prices - supermarket, off licence deals if necessary...
Bitter is pretty much a sub-species. If you want to, it's easy to avoid. TBF, there's few draught bitters I'll actually drink in London - just Young's Special!

There are so many excellent bottled beers - from ales to Pilsners to ESBs to Kolsch to Stouts to Milds to Goldens and Ales, that you can avoid bitter ever passing your lips, if you wish to.

If you ever want to experiment, online retailers like Beers of Europe do some very good mixed cases. The prices can be a bit hairy, but you can try some stuff that never usually makes it onto off-licence and supermarket shelves. A poster on here who'd tried a dark wheat beer (dunkel weisse) in Munich, but had never found it for sale over here was made up when I recommended the site to him, and he found that they sold it, albeit at £2.50 for a 500ml bottle!
 
Anything really good about it, can I buy it locally?
You might find it at Art and Craft in Streatham Hill or Hop Burns and Black in East Dulwich if you're happy jump on a bus/train. Not going to be the cheapest way to buy beer (as per conversation on the other thread) but the 'new wave' of craft beers can be hard to find in regular shops. A can of High Wire Grapefruit is £2.95 in HB&B but only £2 direct from the brewery (but that's in Huddersfield).

art-and-craft

HB&B Welcome

I like the Gipsy Hill Brewery beers. Yuzu is interesting (bottled) and they do the other Pale Ales on proper draught (i.e. hand pulled cask rather than carbonated keg). I prefer my beer uncarbonated wherever possible.
 

ViolentPanda

Hardly getting over it.
Some non-bitter supermarket-available bottled beers that I really like:

Fraoch Heather Ale - it's pronounced "frook", and uses heather rather than hops, tastes like a superior full-bodied lager.
Manns Brown Ale - only 2.7%, but a lovely flavour.
Bombardier Banana Bread Ale - 4%-ish, smells like it's called. Very refreshing.
Dortmunder Union Export - still the North German "export" lager against which all others should be measured. One of only two lagers I keep for guests - the other is Budweis.
Paulaner Salvator - a "winter beer" from a several centuries-old recipe that's still brewed by the same family. It's strong - 7% - but is such a fantastic beer experience that you'll only drink a couple before feeling full. Much impersonated - there's a whole genus of strong German beers that are imitations of Salvator - but never bettered.
 
Canning is cheaper and more convenient from a production point of view. You're dealing with a pasteurised liquid that doesn't "condition" (and thus have a small potential to spoil) in storage, and you have nothing like the breakage/failure rate that bottles experience. I can understand canned ales being popular, but they're only rarely going to live up to their draught and bottled stable-mates. There's a good reason that so few brewers in continental Europe primarily use cans - because it doesn't do their beers any favours, and they refuse to brew "for the can". Over here the big breweries spent 50 years brewing for their own convenience, so you got abominations like Watney Red Barrel, which tasted equally vile on tap and in a Party Seven, and tinned Double Diamond, which tasted nothing like it's draught brother.
One of the micro-canning companies has this to say:
"Does canning real ale effect its taste?
This is a debate that will run and run. Simply put, there will always be people who prefer drinking real ale out of a bottle / glass. We saw the same when we moved form corked wine bottles to screw tops. That’s absolutely fine, of course it is. However, there are many reasons / occasions when this is not possible / not wanted.
The traditional debate has centered on factors including taste, odour and colour. Beer is a sensitive beverage and exposure to both light and oxygen results in off-flavors. It’s a fact that the caps on bottles are rarely not completely airtight, creating a chemical reaction between oxygen and the hops. Bottles invariably let more light into the beer as compared with cans. Cans are impervious to light so the issue is immediately resolved. At WeCan we achieve DO levels of 10-20 ppb, protecting the flavour, reducing chances of creating an unpleasant aroma, and extending the shelf life (in excess of 120 days however dependent on beer type, pasteurisation etc).
Some of the proponents of bottles have remained steadfast in the claim that cans produce a metallic taste, however there has been little empirical evidence to support the claim.
Andy comments, “I do find it slightly amusing that no one seems to mind the fact that kegged ale often sits in an aluminum keg!”
“We have worked with the manufactures of our cans to ensure that they are lined with water epoxy, which ensures there is no beer – metal contact”.
WeCan Solutions have even conducted a taste test where 3 / 4 blindfolded people stated that the beer that came out of our cans had a preferable taste to that out of a bottle. Why not try their taste test by contacting etc...."

Apparently there is a lining on the inside of the can that prevents beer touching metal, that was on one of the canning sites somewhere.

There's also the fact of what it is stored in, as well as what you drink it out of (same as the way you might decant wine to let it breathe).

I'd agree that historically, the 'big' brewers have canned for convenience rather than flavour. And that in fact the beer itself might even be a different recipe (see CH1 's comment about London Pride being rotten on BA flights - I agree). But Pride is something primarily you drink uncarbonated from cask.

Also, a lot of the new wave are quite heavy on flavour and alcohol content and so are going to hold their own in a can better than shite like John Smiths and London Pride (in a can at least - I don't mind it on draught if its kept well).

Can't comment on ViolentPanda 's European dark beers as I don't tend to drink them but I suspect they probably wouldn't be very nice in cans!!
 
Bitter is pretty much a sub-species. If you want to, it's easy to avoid. TBF, there's few draught bitters I'll actually drink in London - just Young's Special!
I quite like Bombardier - it's fairly consistent. But you just don't get much good bitter anymore do you? It's all hoppy pale.

Harvey's Sussex bitter is always good in the Market Porter.
 

ViolentPanda

Hardly getting over it.
I quite like Bombardier - it's fairly consistent. But you just don't get much good bitter anymore do you? It's all hoppy pale.

Harvey's Sussex bitter is always good in the Market Porter.
Heavily-hopped pales are "fashionable" at the mo, both here and in the US, especially ones using North American hop breeds like Citra. Give it a couple of years, and the fad will move onto something else, perhaps even "traditional" bitters!
 

alfajobrob

Well-Known Member
Heavily-hopped pales are "fashionable" at the mo, both here and in the US, especially ones using North American hop breeds like Citra. Give it a couple of years, and the fad will move onto something else, perhaps even "traditional" bitters!
I'm sure that will happen as I get older...my tastes have changed over the years and I am getting more into bitters as I go

What do you reckon of Ringwood brewery btw...I'm going on a tour\pints and cheap bottles in a couple of weeks.
 
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