Basic DIY questions?

Discussion in 'suburban75' started by UnderAnOpenSky, Nov 4, 2016.

  1. StoneRoad

    StoneRoad heckling from the back!

    You'll maybe need some "damp proof paint" as a seal on that wall, otherwise the manky stuff could leach through (again).

    Is that wall behind the hob "cutting off" a corner of the room, or does it match the floor plan / outside wall ?
     
  2. UnderAnOpenSky

    UnderAnOpenSky baseline neural therapy

    That's not on an outside wall. I'm hoping that it's just damp from cooking. Did get the full survey done when I bought it last year rather then just a valuation.

    The wood is the weird thing. It doesn't match the floorplan and upstairs is the bathroom which is just normal shaped. If I had the funds to replace the kitchen totally I'd look at taking it out, but can't understand why you'd lose the space. The woods in great condition. It's obviously not the same age as the house.
     
  3. danski

    danski Comfortable chair.

    Damp on ceiling/wall from leak in bathroom maybe. Check that before making good downstairs.
     
  4. existentialist

    existentialist It could always be worse.

    It really is worth trying to establish, before you do any more work on it, what the source of the damp is, and whether it's historical or ongoing. It's a complete pisser to finish a job and find out, a week later, that you've got to undo it all to resolve some underlying problem.

    That's experience talking, that is :) I did a lot of work on some woodwork in our kitchen, only to discover a microscopic but continual leak from a washing machine inlet which meant I had to rip it all out to fix the leak, let everything dry, and then do the whole job again. Not an experience I was happy to have.
     
    Callie and UnderAnOpenSky like this.
  5. UnderAnOpenSky

    UnderAnOpenSky baseline neural therapy

    OK. Will do. I'm going to attempt to paint straight onto the plaster. It doesn't feel damp fwiw and it's the only section the paper has bubbled. It may well have been the bathroom, but we have regrouted that after getting water out near the light fitting when we moved in. It did feel "crumby" at the ceiling at the point. I've knocked of all the lose stuff and filled the gap with silicone sealant as it's what I had lying around.

    Any suggestions for what to about the gap behind the hob. I'm assuming it's some kind of panel to stop splashes, but like everything it's hard to search if you don't know the name.
     
  6. WouldBe

    WouldBe non smoking

    I take it the gap you're referring to is where the missing tiles are? If so you want to look for a splashback. :)
     
    UnderAnOpenSky likes this.
  7. existentialist

    existentialist It could always be worse.

    It's quite hard to see what it might be from your photo. Judging by the angle of the wall on the right of the photo, it may be that the panel is boarding off the end of the room where that wall meets a back wall at an acute angle, but I can't really tell. Peering through that hole at the back with a torch might yield something useful.

    I'm a bit allergic to "voids" - I don't like boxing off areas of places without there being a pretty good reason. It may be that they decided it was a good way to create a bit of straight surface where they could put something like the cooker. I imagine the hole is for the exhaust of a cooker hood, for which the power supply arrives at that switch to the right of the hole. I'd be a bit cautious about where the cooker hood was venting to - for example, it would be quite dumb to simply vent a load of moisture-laden air into a void space! But you might be able to run ducting to an external wall (which I think you were talking about), without too much trouble - though it's going to be interesting working behind the partition via that small hole. It could be worth seeing if parts of it can be non-sacrificially removed to ease access, then replaced afterwards.

    Oh, and you can hire diamond core drills for making holes in masonry for vents, fans, etc. - you'll get a far better quality tool than anything you could buy at a reasonable price, and it'll make the job a lot easier.
     
    UnderAnOpenSky likes this.
  8. existentialist

    existentialist It could always be worse.

    Which side of the hob area is the external wall?
     
  9. Cid

    Cid 慢慢走

    Probably the one with a window in it. :)
     
  10. existentialist

    existentialist It could always be worse.

    I wasn't sure that was a window! I thought it might be a glass-fronted cupboard. *looks again*
     
    Pickman's model likes this.
  11. Cid

    Cid 慢慢走

    I mean the thing with a blind in front of it through which you can see the night.
     
  12. existentialist

    existentialist It could always be worse.

    Ah, gotcha. I'd missed that image :oops:. I was asking in regard to the damp - I'd half expected that, if the previous owners had just been venting the cooker hood into the void, then damp might be expected on the external wall. Except that, in this case, it appears to have been on the internal one. It was curiosity more than anything, so probably not terribly important.
     
  13. UnderAnOpenSky

    UnderAnOpenSky baseline neural therapy

    Yeah I've no idea about the void. It's all dry inside, no damp, plastered walls. The old extractor fan was set with filters and no vents so no idea why there is a hole that looks like it should take ducting. Will be fun getting it through, but I recon a person each side once we've cut a hole in the exterior wall. Luckily got a mate who has some serious drills. Suspect my little Bosch would struggle some what.

    An evening painting tonight. Having a 1900 lumen torch has some advantages, but suspect it will look very different in the light. Removed the light fitting to find the earth had been connected, despite the light fitting having a cable for it.

    Blitzing everything white. When I can't see anymore Blue, I've got some eye wateringly expensive kitchen paint to go over the top. :)

    Realised we've spent 2k since we moved in, but that includes tools and everything as we had nothing to start. Pretty cheap I guess and the house already feels so much nicer then we moved in.
     
    gentlegreen likes this.
  14. UnderAnOpenSky

    UnderAnOpenSky baseline neural therapy

    Fuck me. Kitchens are a ball ache to paint. So much cutting in. Not helped of course by the strong blue.

    I'm trying to bear in mind what existentialist pointed out regarding what I notice when up close might not be so bad in a few weeks time with all the stuff back in the kitchen.
     
    existentialist likes this.
  15. UnderAnOpenSky

    UnderAnOpenSky baseline neural therapy

    Oh dear. That wall was damper then I thought. First layer of paint peeled of it. Not put any more on it. Going to leave it for a few weeks. Hopefully it's just the damp that was trapped behind the lining paper. Not sure what I'll do if not.

    Looking at ducting kits at the moment. What do people recon with aluminium vs plastic. Aluminium seems like it should be more durable, but harder to work with and get through that space.
     
  16. StoneRoad

    StoneRoad heckling from the back!

    Try an extremely watered down coat of emulsion, after washing with sugar soap on a foam/green pan scourer - give a while to dry off.
    (using the rough / green side should give the emulsion something to grip / soak into - don't scrub too hard, otherwise you will scratch soft plaster))
     
    UnderAnOpenSky likes this.
  17. existentialist

    existentialist It could always be worse.

    If the wall is that damp, I'd be quite surprised if it was just a bit of lining paper keeping it that way - check outside for things like leaking gutters, and inside for any piping in the vicinity (including immediately upstairs from it) that could be providing the damp.

    As for the ducting, I'd probably be inclined to stick with what is cheaper and easier - which sounds like it's going to be the plastic stuff.
     
    UnderAnOpenSky and danski like this.
  18. WouldBe

    WouldBe non smoking

    I'd go for the plastic stuff. Easier to work with and cheaper. If you don't want a white vent on the outside you can get them in brown, black, terracotta and cream as well. :)
     
  19. OzT

    OzT Online early mornings when at work ....

    Why not, think it's called fresco, and some famous people have done it, and it's very common in places like Florence etc. Think they call it early renaissance painting or something like that
     
  20. existentialist

    existentialist It could always be worse.

    UnderAnOpenSky's kitchen, some time later...
    [​IMG]
     
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  21. OzT

    OzT Online early mornings when at work ....

    Hmmm maybe a bit ambitious for a first attempt, but wouldn't we all like it if UnderAnOpenSky did do something like that!!! :)
     
    existentialist likes this.
  22. UnderAnOpenSky

    UnderAnOpenSky baseline neural therapy

    It's an internal wall. The outside is fine. Is just one patch, rather then the whole thing, but still. I suppose the next diagnosis is go knock on the neighbours and see if they have issues.

    Plastic stuff does seem easier annoyingly I've ordered one that used 150mm ducting. Can be adapted for smaller, but assuming that effects the extraction rate. Or maybe I'm over thinking this.

    Thanks. I put a single coat of paint on before stopping (the others have had three). Do you mean wipe down this paintwork? What does the watered down emulsion do?
     
  23. Backatcha Bandit

    Backatcha Bandit ..likes the post, hates the poster.

    It's commonly called a 'mist coat'.

    It seals the plaster by filling in all the little tiny holes/pores, which would otherwise draw the moisture out of the paint too quickly, leaving a 'skin' of paint that is then prone to flaking off.
     
  24. UnderAnOpenSky

    UnderAnOpenSky baseline neural therapy

    Ah. Good stuff. As always this thread and people on urban deliver. :)

    So what ratio is thinned down? 50/50 or even more?

    This is the wall as it stands. Peeled back as much of the paint as I could without scraping and maybe damaging plaster.

    1484669154739-1534781967.jpg
     
  25. Backatcha Bandit

    Backatcha Bandit ..likes the post, hates the poster.

    50/50 should be fine for a mist coat. :)

    I'm still not sure if that damp patch on the ceiling/wall isn't a leak from the bathroom above, though.

    What did you mean by 'after getting water out near the light fitting' above? The Kitchen light fitting?
     
    UnderAnOpenSky likes this.
  26. StoneRoad

    StoneRoad heckling from the back!

    scrub a bit more, tbn if you can get it all of that would be best, other wise you'll need to blend the edges ...
    Dilution for mist coats; can be 50/50 or even 70 water:30 emulsion - the idea is to get it to soak into the plaster and fill the surface so the next coat has something to bond onto.

    Personal experience, when I decorated our current place - which required serious effort with sugar soap as the previous occupier had been a heavy smoker even in rooms with bare plaster. I used 70 water then 50/50 then 30 water as the three base coats before the colour coat was applied. I did one coat a day as these rooms are not tiny ! Then the final coat, using a trade paint that needed nearly 20% water to get it thin enough to roller smooth ... I then did the last gloss on the woodwork, having done a precoat. I've a steady enough hand not to need to use masking tape. Usually I cheat, and paint skirtings and architraves before fitting them.
     
    UnderAnOpenSky likes this.
  27. UnderAnOpenSky

    UnderAnOpenSky baseline neural therapy

    When we moved in we washed the bathroom floor and water came out the light fitting. We've since regrouted the bathroom and touch wood have had no more issues..

    Thanks for the tips. I shall make a nice dilute stuff mix of the white and see how that fairs.

    My afternoons job also is going badly. :facepalm:

    Preparing a living room wall for painting. Lots of rawl plugs in plaster. Plan was to put a screw in and pull it out, complete with the plug and then use caulk. Except....

    1484671576632-1010597270.jpg

    There are loads as well. And thats before I get to the huge ones that had a TV Bracket on. :(
     
  28. Minnie_the_Minx

    Minnie_the_Minx someinenhhanding menbag and me ah bollox

    Agree absoutely. You can buy plenty of good stuff in £1 shops but tools aren't one of them. You risk doing yourself an injury as some tools are so shite, they can literally snap with very little force whatsoever
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2017
  29. Minnie_the_Minx

    Minnie_the_Minx someinenhhanding menbag and me ah bollox

    As scares drill me,I bought a hardwall tacker. Handy things and no need for rawl plugs etc. they're fine for picture frames but despite the claim to drill through concrete, I could never get it to do that.
     
  30. UnderAnOpenSky

    UnderAnOpenSky baseline neural therapy

    Drilled the fuckers out. :cool:

    All the plugs I've sunk up till now have been for pretty substantial stuff.

    The ones for my Plasma TV were a monster!
     

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