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Art that people rave about that's actually shit.

fishfinger

تپلی
No... but it's the same culture that breeds Apple fanboys. It's a big part of what's wrong in the world.
I don't think it's anything like that. These are not consumer products. The prices that they fetch may well be obscene, but it's not as if it makes a difference to the likes of you or me.
 

bubblesmcgrath

Well-Known Member
If someone wants to pay that much for an artwork, then surely that is their choice - I doubt that they had a gun placed against their head.
Sure.....but is it really great art?

I don't think it's anything like that. These are not consumer products. The prices that they fetch may well be obscene, but it's not as if it makes a difference to the likes of you or me.
Of course they're consumer products. If they were free nobody would bother with them. Their price tag is what makes them consumable to the nth degree and the fact that some art critic has represented them well and they've hung in a prestigious gallery is part and parcel of creating a consumer product for a wealthy investor.
IMO..
 

Dr_Herbz

Devil's Advocate
Banned
I don't think it's anything like that. These are not consumer products. The prices that they fetch may well be obscene, but it's not as if it makes a difference to the likes of you or me.
I see poverty and starvation throughout the world, then I see someone has paid enough money to feed countless starving people for a piece of shite 'art'. This does actually affect me... it sickens me.
 

Cheesypoof

Fuck off Noddy
Banned
I went to see Tracy Emin's exhibition 'Love is what you want' and really liked it. Her attention to detail with quilting is extremely skillful and her prolific writing is quality. I think she is a good artist (i dont say this lightly, i spent two hours at this exhibition, which was a kind of magnum opus of all her work) and it is actually good (and very, very detailed).
 

weltweit

Well-Known Member
I do like abstract stuff indeed a lot of my photography is quite abstract which begs the question why do I need a sophisticated camera to make images which comprise mainly blurring. I think the artists that command big prices are doing something interesting usually although I am sure there are volumes of artists also doing interesting work which has not hit the big time money wise. That said I like the pickled shark and the jewelled skull and they are expensive! So there!
 

fishfinger

تپلی
Sure.....but is it really great art?
Is what great art? The 2 pieces you put in the OP? - I don't know. I quite like the Lucio Fontana piece, I'm less keen on the Christopher Wool one, although some of his other work is interesting.

Of course they're consumer products. If they were free nobody would bother with them. Their price tag is what makes them consumable to the nth degree and the fact that some art critic has represented them well and they've hung in a prestigious gallery is part and parcel of creating a consumer product for a wealthy investor.
IMO..
Maybe that was a bad term for me to use. What I meant, is that they are not a throw-away mass produced items.
 

fishfinger

تپلی
I see poverty and starvation throughout the world, then I see someone has paid enough money to feed countless starving people for a piece of shite 'art'. This does actually affect me... it sickens me.
I didn't say that it doesn't affect you. Whether the person spent their money on "shite 'art' " or just burnt it makes no difference. The fact that they have that disposable money is another thing entirely.
 

bubblesmcgrath

Well-Known Member
Yes Tracy Emin's quilting is interesting...speaking as someone who has actually made a hand stitched quilt it is a long tedious process...
I have seen fantastic hand stitched detailed quilts that are really beautiful.
Tracey makes what I'd call graffiti like quilts. And I could be wrong but I think hers are made using macine stitching.

I like truth in art....I'm not so sure that the artworld of 2014 is about truth anymore. Am I wrong?
Is it too attached to money...and who you know?
 

weltweit

Well-Known Member
I have some pictures on my walls, a pastel winter scene and a Tibetan oils scene. They have sentimental value and I do have affection for them but I would actually prefer now to put my own art on my own walls, I may have to dispose of these to make room.
 

bubblesmcgrath

Well-Known Member
Art has a long history of involvement with money. Without a patron, most famous artists would never have worked
Patronage yes .... but this?



“Balloon Dog (Orange)” by Jeff Koons. The work sold for $58.4 million, a world auction record for the artist and a world auction record for a living artist, according to Christie’s..
 

weltweit

Well-Known Member
I do think Emin's bed is rubbish (well it is) though, she has claimed it is a seminal work, well it is seminal in that it is the first time someone has managed to get an art lover to pay that sort of price for an unmade bed certainly, but if it is seminal in the traditional understanding of the world, where are all the follow on beds from other artists? Where?
 

fishfinger

تپلی
Patronage yes .... but this?



“Balloon Dog (Orange)” by Jeff Koons. The work sold for $58.4 million, a world auction record for the artist and a world auction record for a living artist, according to Christie’s..
Jeff Koons did not sell that work for $58.4 million. It was owned by Peter Brant, who bought it in the 1990s. The money raised by the sale was invested into The Brant Foundation Art Study Center.
 
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