Urban75 Home About Offline BrixtonBuzz Contact

Apple reduces speed of iPhones as batteries wear out, report suggests

cybershot

Well-Known Member
So if I have an iPad that is always connected to a power source why should it be slowed?
If it’s constantly plugged into power you’re degrading the battery far quicker. So I wouldn’t be surprised.

Apple seem intent on giving us iOS tips with every upgrade. It’s about time they helped educate people how these batteries actually work and that charging them every night or doing things that get them insanely hot is the worse thing ever.
 

cybershot

Well-Known Member
Seeing how this is basically a battery-management measure, would be interesting to know how much this slowdown generally is in reality terms compared to some people's perceptions.

A quick eyeball of benchmark data suggests it is imperceptible compared to the slowdown caused by adding more OS features...
My iPhone 6 was becoming unusable. Waiting for what felt far too long for simple tasks such as launching an app. The battery % would jump all over the place too. And it would shut down when it apparently still had ~30% power left. To the point I’d walk around with power banks on me as I had no faith or n how much battery I actually had left.

Replacing the battery solved all the above.

A few people have posted similar results on the iOS thread (sorry still not got through all this thread yet so maybe evidence here too)

I think it was also briefly discussed in the iPhone X thread.
 

8ball

Hetero Sapiens
My iPhone 6 was becoming unusable. Waiting for what felt far too long for simple tasks such as launching an app. The battery % would jump all over the place too. And it would shut down when it apparently still had ~30% power left. To the point I’d walk around with power banks on me as I had no faith or n how much battery I actually had left.
That sounds more like a battery fault.
 

8ball

Hetero Sapiens
Apple seem intent on giving us iOS tips with every upgrade. It’s about time they helped educate people how these batteries actually work and that charging them every night or doing things that get them insanely hot is the worse thing ever.
Some apps, including theirs, rely on being plugged into power and certain things, like updates and backups, also assume people will be plugged in overnight.

Also, there’s the entire games industry creating apps that ramp up battery temp.
Plus the drive to bring out new phones and tempt people with the shiny shiny.

So can’t see it happening, unfortunately.
 

moon

Happy Happy Jo Wonderland
If it’s constantly plugged into power you’re degrading the battery far quicker. So I wouldn’t be surprised.

Apple seem intent on giving us iOS tips with every upgrade. It’s about time they helped educate people how these batteries actually work and that charging them every night or doing things that get them insanely hot is the worse thing ever.
I never use my iPad battery... it is always plugged into a power source...
 

8ball

Hetero Sapiens
I never use my iPad battery... it is always plugged into a power source...
Pretty sure you’re *always* using it in that case since afaik iPads have no bypass circuit. Though the battery will constantly be under a lot of stress and will degrade quickly, hence @cybershot’s question...
 

moon

Happy Happy Jo Wonderland
So what, I have no need for a battery so my device should never be intentionally slowed.
 

cybershot

Well-Known Member
So what, I have no need for a battery so my device should never be intentionally slowed.
If only Apple saw it that way, although there's no confirmation this is happening to iPads anyway as far as I'm aware.

Just so you know, by having any device powered by an Li-ion battery constantly connected to power is bad for it's lifespan. Your battery, theortically, depending on the age of the iPad 'could' be in a pretty bad state as it will have gone through many charge cycles by always being connected.

If Apple were to do the same to iPads as they are to iPhones you'd probably find they have enforced your device to 'slow down' in order to prolong the battery lifespan because they will class it as being in a degraded state.

Note, lifespan is the whole life of the battery, not how quickly it goes from 100% to 0%.

See the post I posted above which explains how li-ion batteries work in more detail if you care: Apple reduces speed of iPhones as batteries wear out, report suggests

If not, then don't worry about it.
 

moon

Happy Happy Jo Wonderland
If only Apple saw it that way, although there's no confirmation this is happening to iPads anyway as far as I'm aware.

Just so you know, by having any device powered by an Li-ion battery constantly connected to power is bad for it's lifespan. Your battery, theortically, depending on the age of the iPad 'could' be in a pretty bad state as it will have gone through many charge cycles by always being connected.

If Apple were to do the same to iPads as they are to iPhones you'd probably find they have enforced your device to 'slow down' in order to prolong the battery lifespan because they will class it as being in a degraded state.

Note, lifespan is the whole life of the battery, not how quickly it goes from 100% to 0%.

See the post I posted above which explains how li-ion batteries work in more detail if you care: Apple reduces speed of iPhones as batteries wear out, report suggests

If not, then don't worry about it.
Please... :rolleyes: I don't need a lecture on li-ion batteries thanx, I own a 375 Wh one which I maintain for optimum lifespan.
How many times to I have to repeat that I don't need to maintain the battery in my iPad??
 

cybershot

Well-Known Member
Please... :rolleyes: I don't need a lecture on li-ion batteries thanx, I own a 375 Wh one which I maintain for optimum lifespan.
How many times to I have to repeat that I don't need to maintain the battery in my iPad??
I don’t know you personally. It’s your choice to take it as lecture or not. It might still be useful to someone who does leave their ipad on a dock and wonders why it’s performance is crap.

It would have been easier to not reply. :)
 

mauvais

change has become unavoidable
Eventually you will probably find that the knackered battery stops it working at all, i.e. it drains faster than it charges and thus switches off whilst plugged in.
 

newbie

undisambiguated
One one of the better articles out there about smartphone batteries which applies to everything including laptops not just phones. Posted it a few times before.

Check out out battery charging tips and tricks to make your device
it's great advice: keep your battery charged at about 50% and it will last forever (except that in use it'll go flat in half the time, every time :) ). Never store batteries at full charge (so my 3 spares should be kept half charged then topped up before use.)

The theories are great but implementation has to be by lifestyle choice, choosing how to live, when to go and actually use the damn thing, when to be near a charger in order to maintain a healthy battery.

Or accept that the technology has a limited life and needs to be swapped out when it's too tired. That's why I have 4, two healthy and two old ones for backup. They're 3300 mAh, they cost under a fiver each. Integral batteries are good for the manufacturers bottom line, and for those that care about style, but push consumers towards the upgrade path as they age.

My impression is that Android throttles performance with old batteries, but I can't be sure. I've looked at CPU frequency stats but can only manually compare different batteries. mauvais I don't suppose you know of a battery or CPU analyser that can produce a long term log, identifying which battery is actually in the phone at the time? I've looked but never found one.
 

mauvais

change has become unavoidable
My impression is that Android throttles performance with old batteries, but I can't be sure. I've looked at CPU frequency stats but can only manually compare different batteries. mauvais I don't suppose you know of a battery or CPU analyser that can produce a long term log, identifying which battery is actually in the phone at the time? I've looked but never found one.
Whatever Android devices do in terms of battery performance/throttling will be hardware or chipset specific, not something common across Android.

Android devices, once old, do exhibit the problems that Apple are trying to address - unpredictable monitoring and premature switch-off. That's because trying to figure out what % is left is not a quantifiable fact, it's a best guess based on a few different things.

As for battery stats, there's nothing (other than pattern analysis) that would tell an app which of several batteries was installed. You can probably get apps that log battery performance to a file - you used to be able to write apps that subscribe to percentage battery changes, and potentially other stuff like device activity, although it may be more difficult these days as there have been a lot more monitoring restrictions introduced in the interests of reducing battery drain.
 

mauvais

change has become unavoidable
I've got one that does all that but doesn't differentiate batteries.

thanks, that's useful.
Modern removable batteries tend to have management chips in, hence the multiple contacts besides positive and negative, so at some level there may well be an identifier, but nothing is exposed to apps.

For example: Android: programmatically get battery serial number

This will be device specific and may require root.
 
Last edited:

moon

Happy Happy Jo Wonderland
I don’t know you personally. It’s your choice to take it as lecture or not. It might still be useful to someone who does leave their ipad on a dock and wonders why it’s performance is crap.

It would have been easier to not reply. :)
Yeah I was a bit abrupt/rude sorry about that, it was late at night and I was in physical pain..
no excuses though... :oops:
 

moon

Happy Happy Jo Wonderland
Eventually you will probably find that the knackered battery stops it working at all, i.e. it drains faster than it charges and thus switches off whilst plugged in.
So when the iPad is connected to the lightening cable it is still drawing power from the battery? And not bypassing it?
 

mauvais

change has become unavoidable
So when the iPad is connected to the lightening cable it is still drawing power from the battery? And not bypassing it?
If the others are right about no bypass on an iPad, and they probably are, then yeah.
 

8ball

Hetero Sapiens
If the others are right about no bypass on an iPad, and they probably are, then yeah.
I was going by 3 things:

i) I can hear the charging state of my charger (I have funny hearing) and it sounds like it is actually running on battery, cutting the charge when it hits 100%, then charging again after a bit of use. The cycling seems to be too fast to be just down to the battery gradually losing charge while isolated. Lots of descriptions of Apple circuitry on forums back this up.

ii) My old iPad 2, if used with an ancient iPhone 4 charger, will gradually run down in a constant manner if playing a resource-intensive game. I can't hear any of the switching you might expect to hear if a bypass circuit was involved.

iii) For devices intended to generally run on battery and absolutely minimised for form factor, I can't see Apple putting one in.

But regardless of the bypass, by keeping the battery in a state of very high strain, even with a bypass you could reach a state where it *only* runs on power, which would make it a lot less useful.

And what mauvais says about it eventually draining faster than it charges could happen, regardless of bypass, depending to the prioritisation of how it allocates charge.
 

mauvais

change has become unavoidable
I know what you mean about being able to hear some chargers and you're probably right.

The iPad you mention drains while doing something intensive because the charger is insufficient. You need a 2 amp charger whereas old ones are much less, sometimes 800mA or so.

However we had a house that had some tablet (tbf, cheap Chinese stuff) embedded in the wall, the right charger permanently connected, and eventually it would drop percentage over time - just idling - until it switched off. You also see it with most devices when you flatten the battery, connect a charger and try to switch it on at 0% - the intensive demand of startup will overpower the battery and it'll shut down again.
 
Top