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Ancient art and art from antiquity and cultural treasures from the past

Discussion in 'photography, graphics & art' started by ringo, Apr 16, 2015.

  1. ringo

    ringo Macaroni cheese controller

    Love that, I find it odd that it was even questioned, but am happy to see it proved. The devil story has been used so many times, from Faustus to Robert Johnson. I hope we can one day go back even further and look at how the fairy tales about god and the devil came about, they've had quite an impact.

    "Dr Tehrani said Jack And The Beanstalk was rooted in a group of stories classified as The Boy Who Stole Ogre's Treasure, and could be traced back to when Eastern and Western Indo-European languages split more than 5,000 years ago.

    Analysis showed Beauty And The Beast and Rumpelstiltskin to be about 4,000 years old.

    And a folk tale called The Smith And The Devil, about a blacksmith selling his soul in a pact with the Devil in order to gain supernatural abilities, was estimated to go back 6,000 years to the Bronze Age.

    Dr Tehrani said: "We find it pretty remarkable these stories have survived without being written.

    "They have been told since before even English, French and Italian existed.

    "They were probably told in an extinct Indo-European language.""
     
  2. DotCommunist

    DotCommunist my world is fire and blood

    by who? I thought it was just then that they started being written down rather than part of an oral tradition
     
  3. Pickman's model

    Pickman's model Every man and every woman is a star

    nice to see them catching up with aleister crowley http://www.luckymojo.com/esoteric/occultism/magic/ceremonial/crowley/004bfint.txt
     
  4. wayward bob

    wayward bob i ate all your bees

  5. trabuquera

    trabuquera Modesty Bag

    Meanwhile, more news of those who don't believe in cultural treasures from the past (or any past other than their own narrow splinter sect's) ... IS apparently levelled the oldest Christian monastery in Iraq last autumn and satellite imagery has just emerged showing the field of rubble they left behind.

    By the picturres it doesn't seem to have been the oldest, most aesthetically extraordinary, or even the holiest (for Christians) site in Iraq , but all the same. fuxake you bigoted fundamentalist idiots...

    Iraq's oldest Christian monastery destroyed by Islamic State - BBC News
     
  6. moon

    moon Happy Happy Jo Wonderland

    One of the rock hewn, underground churches of Lalibela in Ethiopia
    Rock-Hewn-Churches-Lalibela.jpg
     
  7. wayward bob

    wayward bob i ate all your bees

    reminds me of the step wells in india :)

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  8. ringo

    ringo Macaroni cheese controller

    Not like :(
     
  9. Artaxerxes

    Artaxerxes Well-Known Member

    Step wells are amazing, seriously.

    Oral traditions have had a bum rap for a long time sadly, societies like the Celts or other tribal peoples were thought to be primitive because they didn't write down histories like the Greeks and Romans, the perception is changing slowly along with the realisation that a formalised oral tradition can retain useful information for decades if not longer due to the use of rhyme and rythmn to record information.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2016
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  10. Sirena

    Sirena Don't monkey with the buzzsaw

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  11. moon

    moon Happy Happy Jo Wonderland

    Celestial clocks are amazing, here is one of my faves in Prague
    Czech-2013-Prague-Astronomical_clock_face.jpg

    And another on the outside of the old Financial Times building in London, the image in the centre is Winston Churchill
    astronomical clock.jpg
     
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  12. ringo

    ringo Macaroni cheese controller

    Love that clock, spent a lovely stoned couple of hours staring at it one time :)

    I didn't realise that was Churchill. It's almost impossible to comprehend now just how great the love for Churchill was after the war, especially for us (mostly) anti-war anti-Tories on here. The funeral stopped the whole country, probably not seen again until the overblown sobfest of Diana. Probably counts as a cultural treasure on its own.

    It's astonishing that following his death the public sent money, in quite extraordinary quantities, for absolutely no reason, completely unbidden, and they had no idea what to do with it. The Churchill Memorial Trust (Winston Churchill Memorial Trust) still has huge cash deposits and gives extremely numerous grants every year to British citizens to "investigate inspiring practice in other countries, and return with innovative ideas for the benefit of people across the UK". My Ex did it, getting enough money to travel West Africa investigating repatriating Rastas, along with my 1 year old. I had to pay for myself, but worth it for the chance to travel beautiful countries and explore their cultures. Must photograph those masks :)
     
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  13. moon

    moon Happy Happy Jo Wonderland

    ringo you didn't go to Shashamane?
     
  14. ringo

    ringo Macaroni cheese controller

    No, never made it to Ethiopia (yet). Went to Senegal, Mali, Burkina Faso and Ghana.
     
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  15. ringo

    ringo Macaroni cheese controller

    Slightly baffled by comments on the War & Peace thread suggesting that the naked male body is lacking in beauty, so here's a celebration of the form, as interpreted by some of the greatest artists to have walked the earth.
    Michaelangelo's David:
    [​IMG]

    Polykleitos' Doryphoros:
    [​IMG]

    Hercules Battling Achelous Metamorphed into a Serpent”. ... by Baron François Joseph 1824
    [​IMG]
    Leonardo Da Vinci:
    [​IMG]
     
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  16. ringo

    ringo Macaroni cheese controller

    Bernini:
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
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  17. danny la rouge

    danny la rouge This is definitely the darkest timeline

    Just found this thread. It's excellent, thanks.
     
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  18. Sirena

    Sirena Don't monkey with the buzzsaw

  19. ringo

    ringo Macaroni cheese controller

    Love those Sirena , never seen them before :thumbs:
     
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  20. trabuquera

    trabuquera Modesty Bag

    They're astonishing - thank you Sirena! I'd never seen or even heard of them before either. I feel such an urge to touch their ancient beards :D. Mindboggling (and chilling tbh) to think of all the stuff we've never seen and don't know about from such a long way back - just how much of the fabric of people's lives we have no idea about. what on earth were they doing in there? what sort of rites called for lovely clay-model bison? and just how did that artist get so good?
     
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  21. ringo

    ringo Macaroni cheese controller

    Just the sort of question I'm always pondering. I've got this on my pile of books to read:
    [​IMG]
    "Planet Earth is 4.5 billion years old. In just a fraction of that time, one species among countless others has conquered it. Us.

    We are the most advanced and most destructive animals ever to have lived. What makes us brilliant? What makes us deadly? What makes us Sapiens?

    In this bold and provocative book, Yuval Noah Harari explores who we are, how we got here and where we’re going.

    Sapiens is a thrilling account of humankind’s extraordinary history – from the Stone Age to the Silicon Age – and our journey from insignificant apes to rulers of the world"
     
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  22. Sirena

    Sirena Don't monkey with the buzzsaw

    One of the things I've mentioned before is that I'm sure I came out of junior school with the notion that we were savages living in caves and then Jesus came!

    Every year that passes seems to push back 'civilization' another ten thousand years, maybe even a hundred thousand years.

    A recent exhibition at the British Museum featured stone-age toys, some articulated like puppets, some probably designed to provide entertainment with shadows. These were 30,000 years old. The earliest formal grave burial found, so far, takes us back 50,000 years (Neanderthal Burials Confirmed as Ancient Ritual) and, on television last week, they showed a carefully worked tool taken from the sea where the land-bridge from Britain to Europe used to be. Its age was estimated at 450,000 years!

    I think we have to accept that sophisticated civilizations, complete with traditional social conventions and belief systems built up over countless generations, have come and gone over hundreds of thousands of years.
     
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  23. ringo

    ringo Macaroni cheese controller

    Exactly right, I reckon. We're just touching the surface of finding out how we evolved into our current societies. There may have been complex societies which far outlasted our current ideas of great civilisations.
     
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  24. Pickman's model

    Pickman's model Every man and every woman is a star

    [​IMG]
    egyptian goddess tawaret
     
  25. DotCommunist

    DotCommunist my world is fire and blood

    as beautiful as a stone sculpture nude may be I find the stone pubes hilarious. Can't help it, childish I know. But it cracks me up every time. Cornflakes glued to a ken doll
     
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  26. trabuquera

    trabuquera Modesty Bag

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  27. Artaxerxes

    Artaxerxes Well-Known Member

    Found this and its worth a read.

    Ancient Secrets on Winter Hill

    Not so much art but the imprints that humans have left on the land in the bronze age and iron age right through to the modern day, in ways that aren't often looked at or easy to grasp. The everyday lives that left a mark outside of books of kings and historical texts.
     
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  28. bimble

    bimble Is it Spring yet?

    I really enjoyed that book - so much that I went around trying to bully other people into reading it too. It's a friendly fun to read book. ;)
     
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  29. DotCommunist

    DotCommunist my world is fire and blood

    its terrible, incredibly reductive.
     
  30. Sirena

    Sirena Don't monkey with the buzzsaw

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