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Ancient art and art from antiquity and cultural treasures from the past

Discussion in 'photography, graphics & art' started by ringo, Apr 16, 2015.

  1. ringo

    ringo Macaroni cheese controller

    2000 year old Roman child's sock. British Museum.
    [​IMG]
     
  2. JimW

    JimW 支那暗杀团

    See it has separate big toe like Japanese ones. Love seeing these rare textile survivals. Wasn't one of the Vindolanda letters from a Roman squaddie asking to be sent socks from home? Clearly not bothered about being seen in 'em and sandals.
    ETA Thinking about it, must have been the other way, a letter accompanying a gift of socks from home, and here it is: h2g2 - The Vindolanda Tablets - 'Send More Socks' - Edited Entry
     
    ringo likes this.
  3. ringo

    ringo Macaroni cheese controller

    It could have been the fashion for centuries and we might never know. I think Jesus preferred those separate toe socks with his sandals.
     
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  4. DotCommunist

    DotCommunist my world is fire and blood

    note that its just the one sock. Theres where all the missing ones go, they go to the future
     
    ringo likes this.
  5. JimW

    JimW 支那暗杀团

    So are they woven? I seem to recall knitting isn't invented until the late medieval period, but these look like they might be knitted.
    ETA Looking at wiki: History of knitting - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia seems it might be some version of nålebinding, sort of a basic one needle version.
     
  6. ringo

    ringo Macaroni cheese controller

    Dunno, but weaving was already very advanced by the time of the Romans, I've dug up hundreds of loom weights. I'd have thought knitting, or some sort of manual weaving, must have predated looms by a long way.
     
    JimW likes this.
  7. JimW

    JimW 支那暗杀团

    Look at these 4th century-odd Coptic socks off the Nalebinding page, them's some odd toes:
    [​IMG]
     
    ringo likes this.
  8. ringo

    ringo Macaroni cheese controller

    Weaving came from spinning, so it appears our ancestors went from manual sowing to loom weaving, perhaps without a manual technology in between. Or maybe, and most likely, we just haven't identified it yet.
     
  9. Stanley Edwards

    Stanley Edwards Food please.

    Wish I had time to read the entire thread. My ongoing obsession is with Evolution of a Goddess and ancient beliefs represented in art.

    Dama de Baza was found near a small town named Baza close to Granada. At the time she was thought to be the oldest example of 3D art.

    Iberian sculpture | Wikiwand

    [​IMG]
     
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  10. ringo

    ringo Macaroni cheese controller

    Admired this at the weekend at the natural History Museum.

    Originally part of Sir Hans Sloane’s collection, this nautilus shell was carved by Johannes Belkien, a Dutch artist, in the late seventeenth century.
    Sloane believed this carving, which approximates a mathematical Fibonacci spiral constructed according to the so-called golden ratio, improved on the animal’s natural perfection.
    [​IMG]
    I really like the bronze cast replica they sell in their shop, but I don't have £600 for one, resembles late medieval Italian armour. It might work well upside down as a shoulder tattoo, possible without the cherubs.
    [​IMG]
     
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  11. ringo

    ringo Macaroni cheese controller

    Beautiful Italian parade armour from the Wallace Collection, London.
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
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  12. wayward bob

    wayward bob i ate all your bees

    my best guess (as a sometime weaver) is that tablet or "backstrap" weaving most likely filled that gap.
     
  13. ringo

    ringo Macaroni cheese controller

    Like this? It does look like it might fill the gap, nice one.

    [​IMG]
     
  14. ringo

    ringo Macaroni cheese controller

    Golden Spiral: In geometry, a golden spiral is a logarithmic spiral whose growth factor is φ, the golden ratio.[1] That is, a golden spiral gets wider (or further from its origin) by a factor of φ for every quarter turn it makes.
    The Fibonacci sequence is named after Italian mathematician Fibonacci. His 1202 book Liber Abaci introduced the sequence to Western European mathematics,[5] although the sequence had been described earlier in Indian mathematics.[6][7][8] By modern convention, the sequence begins either with F0 = 0 or with F1 = 1. The Liber Abaci began the sequence with F1 = 1.
    Fibonacci numbers are closely related to Lucas numbers [​IMG] in that they form a complementary pair of Lucas sequences [​IMG] and [​IMG]. They are intimately connected with the golden ratio; for example, the closest rational approximations to the ratio are 2/1, 3/2, 5/3, 8/5
    [​IMG]
    In art:
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  15. moon

    moon Happy Happy Jo Wonderland

    I love the metalwork ringo
    Here are a couple of my favourites from the V&A
    An ornate lock
    lock.jpg
    Detail from the Hereford screen
    hereford screen.jpg

    This is some tile work next to the cash machine at Lloyds on Fleet street, it has to be the most beautiful cash machine in London!

    tiles.jpg
     
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  16. ringo

    ringo Macaroni cheese controller

    I love that lock, I've stood in front of it for ages before. Don't think I've seen those tiles, will have to go and find them :thumbs:
     
  17. trabuquera

    trabuquera Modesty Bag

    The recent BBC4 thing on the story of Scottish art ((The Story of Scottish Art - BBC Two) has some interesting archaic things I'd never heard of or seen ... some unusual Pictish stonework (they had a sophisticated and charming script of carved glyphs of animal/natural things, it wasn't all about the tattooing) and even older, some properly mysterious hand-grenade-sized objects which nobody can explain...

    Ashmolean Museum: British Archaeology Collections - Carved Stone Balls
    Carved Stone Balls - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Look at these:
    petrospheres.JPG

    Dozens and dozens of these have been found across Scotland - carved in various sorts of stone, almost perfectly spherical, dead old (technical term - late Neoloithic or early Bronze Age) and nobody knows what they're for. Too finely worked to be a prehistoric boules set; they're nearly all in good nick, meaning they probably weren't weapons either. There was some talk about them maybe representing particular clans or leaders, or being used for tanning skins, or being the 'talking ball' you had to hold if you wanted to speak in a public assembly. Who knows. But there are more of them (in many fascinating variations, loads of different stones, images in the telly doc above). Also, how did the 'primitive' people get so close to making perfect spheres?
     
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  18. ringo

    ringo Macaroni cheese controller

    I saw that, loved the one with closely spaced nodules like a curled up hedgehog. I'd seen pictures of them before but never film so until then I hadn't realised quite how fabulous and tactile they looked.

    [​IMG]
     
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  19. ringo

    ringo Macaroni cheese controller

    Because they weren't primitive :)
     
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  20. Sirena

    Sirena Don't monkey with the buzzsaw

    Exactly. Just because people didn't know how to work metal doesn't mean they didn't live in sophisticated societies, probably over hundreds of thousands of years.
     
    ringo likes this.
  21. DotCommunist

    DotCommunist my world is fire and blood

    markers to track wealth, money system the old school way


    I recon
     
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  22. moon

    moon Happy Happy Jo Wonderland

    16th century Benin ivory 'Queen Mother' pendant mask, reportedly worn by the Oba (King of Benin)
    Benin sulpture.jpg
     
  23. ringo

    ringo Macaroni cheese controller

    That's lovely. I've got quite a few, I tried to get one from each community I went to in West Africa. I have one with cowrie shells and old pennies illustrating the different currencies before and after colonisation which is a favourite. Also got a massive one I call pigdog but he's in the loft because everyone else is scared of him :)
     
  24. moon

    moon Happy Happy Jo Wonderland

    Photos??!! :)
     
  25. ringo

    ringo Macaroni cheese controller

    I'll try and remember to take some when I'm at home :)
     
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  26. ringo

    ringo Macaroni cheese controller

    The Story of Scottish art also featured this wonderful picture, which I recognised as being copied stylistically by the 1983 2000AD story of Celtic myths - Slaine The Horned God.

    George Henry (1858–1943) and Edward Atkinson Hornel (1864–1933), The Druids Bringing in the Mistletoe. Oil on canvas, 1890.
    [​IMG]

    Simon Bisley:
    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    The Druid painting is currently on loan the the British Museum as part of their Celtic art and identity exhibition:
    History
     
  27. moon

    moon Happy Happy Jo Wonderland

    My favourite dragon in London, its the Birch Dragon (or Griffon) outside the Royal Courts of Justice.
    I walk past him almost every day and have named him Theodore ;)
    theodore.jpg

    Also one of my favourite buildings
    The St Mary Le Strand, one of the 2 'Island Churches' on the Strand... it really is very pretty.
    st-mary-le-strand_1918521i.jpg
     
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  28. ringo

    ringo Macaroni cheese controller

    Nice, I like London's caryatids, will find some pics
     
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  29. ringo

    ringo Macaroni cheese controller

    Caryatids in London.
    St Pancras Church on Euston Road:
    [​IMG]
    Caryatids Pathway at Stables Market in Camden Village:
    [​IMG]

    44 Old Bond street:
    [​IMG]
     
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  30. Sirena

    Sirena Don't monkey with the buzzsaw

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