1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

the 2012 allotment thread

Discussion in 'suburban75' started by mr steev, Mar 9, 2012.

  1. mr steev

    mr steev unkempt clacker

    It's that time of year again. yay :cool:

    How are people getting on with their plotments?

    I've been taking advantage of the reasonably decent weather and the fact that I have another mate helping me this year who's conveniently a builder/groundworks and is out of work at the moment so he is eager to get digging to keep his fitness level up. So most of our plot is dug over and ready.

    I've got some spuds chitting away on the windowsill. Rocket, Red Duke and Maris Piper (wasn't really aiming to get MP, but there weren't that many to choose from as I think I'd left it a bit late (or that due to the nice weather, everyone had the same idea) but at least I know that they'll be versatile eaters. I think I may get another main/late crop. Possibly Desiree as they are drought tolerant apparently and I suspect a dry summer.

    I went to the garden center today and got some shallot sets, peas, parsnips and sprouts.
    Has anyone else made a start yet?
     
  2. The39thStep

    The39thStep Was it over when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbour?

    Overwintered garlic and onions are picking up now. Been picking purple sprouting broccoli, spring onions, the last parsnips. Dug quite a bit over but need to get the rotovator out next month.

    Sown some mixed cabbages in a trough, got Desiree, Nicola, Rooster, and Pentland Javelin potatoes chitting. I still have some onions in the vegetable rack from last year and I am thinking of planting them and earthing them up to grow something like a calcot.
     
  3. mr steev

    mr steev unkempt clacker

    I'm annoyed with myself for not getting any garlic in last year. We've had pretty decent crops over the last few years and have been almost sufficient in them, but last year I left it too late to get any. I may plant some spring ones. We don't bother with onions as we have too much of an onion fly problem (but shallots seem to be more resistant)
    We're still picking parsnips which are mostly a really good size and shape and taste fantastic :)
     
  4. The39thStep

    The39thStep Was it over when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbour?

    Cut the Autumn fruiting raspberries to the ground, dug a bit more. Found some carrots that didn't have much carrot fly on them. Emptoes one of the compost bins onto the new rhubarb patch and picked a few heads of purple broccoli and dug up some jerusalem artichokes.

    Ordered some interesting seeds from the Real Seed Company:

    Reine des Glaces lettuce,Cima di Rapa San Marzan,Feast White Stem Onion,Purple Cauliflower,Giant Bulgarian leek,Salsola,Wizard field bean,Turnip Greens,East Friesian Palm Kale.
     
  5. The39thStep

    The39thStep Was it over when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbour?

    The purple sprouting broccoli is cropping well and I still have loads of leeks . Dug up some salsify and had them Sunday with some lamb. I have started to dig up the strawberry patch to get rid of the couch grass and dandelions and will replant the strawberries on the same patch.
     
  6. Placid Casual27

    Placid Casual27 Gorau Chwarae Cyd Chwarae

    On my allotment which I got towards the end of last summer, there are some raspberry plants - how do I know if they are summer or autumn-fruiting ones?

    And how much shall I cut them back (this coming weekend)?

    Also on rhubarb, I bought 2 crowns at Xmas, planted them and covered them with a bucket. They are now already about 6-8 inches tall. How long til I can pick some of them/what should I do next?

    Thanks and sorry for such (excited!) novice questions
     
  7. mr steev

    mr steev unkempt clacker

    I'd think that the best way to find out which your raspberries are is probably going to wait and see when they fruit. I'd say it's a bit late now to start cutting them back as they probably have started budding. It may be a good idea to chuck some manure around them and just leave them for a few months.

    As for your rhubarb you can pick it whenever. I would be wary of picking it all off this year though as they generally need a few years to establish. When we planted a new crown a couple of years ago we didn't take any off it in the first year, one harvest in the second, and a couple more the year after, but always leaving some stalks on the plant. Don't worry though, you won't kill it, but it may not be as productive next year iyswim

    I did some more planting and sowing yesterday. Some more shallots, spring garlic, spinach, beetroot, parsnips, beans and some peas under glass. We've sorted out the compost heap too by giving it a good turning and insulating it... you can now feel the heat coming off it :cool:
     
  8. The39thStep

    The39thStep Was it over when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbour?

    It used to be that if the canes were hairy/prickly that they were Autumn ones but some of the new types are smooth. I would guess that if they have been there for a while that the hairy/prickly test would be ok. If they are smooth there is still time to cut them by about 1/3rd. If they are hairy I would still cut them.

    Agree with Mr Steev re the rhubarb , go easy this year just pick a enough for one meal perhaps in a fortnight or so? Then leave but remember to add some compost/mulch to them to feed them and to stop them drying out. I am sure if you ask later in the year in Autumn that someone will give you some more crowns.

    Sow some spring or bunching onions now as well.
     
  9. Placid Casual27

    Placid Casual27 Gorau Chwarae Cyd Chwarae

    Thanks to you and to Mr Steev, I'm madly keen but just a bit naive so all appreciated
     
  10. The39thStep

    The39thStep Was it over when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbour?

    Think the important thing to learn is is that you will make lots of mistakes and also find better ways of doing things.
     
  11. mr steev

    mr steev unkempt clacker

    That's what it's all about isn't it :)

    I've just been up my plot and my summer raspberries have started to bud
     
  12. The39thStep

    The39thStep Was it over when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbour?

    Next month or so will be beautiful with the pear, apple and plum blossom coming out. Around the end of the month perhaps the asparagus as well!
     
  13. Idaho

    Idaho blah blah blah

    Didn't see this thread...doh!

    Put the spuds in today. Will put the peas in later this week. Then its just a matter of the various squash family items and the French beans and sweet corn to start off in pots.
     
  14. invisibleplanet

    invisibleplanet porter des cornes

    MELONS!!!!
     
  15. mr steev

    mr steev unkempt clacker

    hmmm, I hadn't thought of that! :)

    My shallots and garlic are showing signs of life and the spinach and some lettuce which I planted under cloches are up too.
    We seem to have loads of spuds as my mate has bought some and another mate gave me another load. I've planted all of the earlies (rocket, aaron pilot and red dukes) and have had to sort some more trenches in another bed for the rest (maris piper, king eds and pink fir apples). I think we should be ok for spuds in a few months :D
    We've finally got round to cutting the two metal barrels we've had for a couple of years and so now have 4 raised beds filled with lovely sifted soil to hopefully beat the carrot fly
     
  16. plurker

    plurker tú no tienes la culpa mi amor que el mundo sea feo

    I have garlic. I planted some cloves in Sept last year, not knowing what to expect from them, and now they have sprouted - when do I pull them up?
    Tomato seeds went in at the weekend, as well as mustard leaves. Perennial rocket is up, as are chives. Will be buying courgette plants and runners in a few weeks...
     
  17. mr steev

    mr steev unkempt clacker

    When the foliage goes yellow and starts to collapse... it will be around the summer solstice in late june.
     
  18. plurker

    plurker tú no tienes la culpa mi amor que el mundo sea feo

    thanks!
     
  19. The39thStep

    The39thStep Was it over when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbour?

    Doubtful outdoors unless you are in the south and its a long hot summer. I have seen them in greenhouses up here , mainly those early Siberian type ones about the size of a softball.
     
  20. The39thStep

    The39thStep Was it over when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbour?

    Don't buy runners and courgettes get seeds , they are a piece of piss to germinate , a lot cheaper and you will have all the excitement that you were responsible for bringing them into the world.

    I grew these courgettes last year [​IMG]
    They are called cousa and they are middle eastern rather than European.

    and the best beans imo are Moonlight .They are a french/runner bean cross , very productive, don't go stringy and are delicious.
     
  21. invisibleplanet

    invisibleplanet porter des cornes

    The old fellas here build raised hot beds (out of wood) and fill them full of rotting horse manure, a layer of compost on top, and grow melons outdoors without any probs.
     
  22. plurker

    plurker tú no tienes la culpa mi amor que el mundo sea feo

    Done that for the last 4 years, got so many tomato seeds now that there's no windowsill left :)
     
  23. The39thStep

    The39thStep Was it over when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbour?


    Read about it in old gardening books but it never actually seen it
     
  24. The39thStep

    The39thStep Was it over when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbour?

    Still digging up loads of leeks and picking purple sprouting broccoli. Dug six potato trenches and will plant the earlies next weekend I think. Have put some broad beans in, sowed some peas and have put the brassica seeds in some boxes at the allotment to germinate. have replanted the strawberry bed and got rid of the couch grass.

    Need to get some envirommesh for my carrot frame as the polythene has perished.

    Made some wild garlic and nettle soup at the weekend.Got some chickens on Saturday but they are housed round the side of the back garden.Easter to Whitsun is always a busy time.
     
  25. mr steev

    mr steev unkempt clacker

    How was the soup? We've got plenty of wild garlic and nettles :)

    I'm not going to complain about the rain as it was definitely needed, but I wish it had come last week when I was working rather than when I have time off :rolleyes:
    There's more signs of life up our plot. The peas, spinach and beetroot are up, and a few asparagus are appearing :cool:
     
  26. The39thStep

    The39thStep Was it over when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbour?

    Its brill, you can feel the goodness when you eat it. I sauté some leeks, with some potato cubes in butter until soft.Wash the nettles wearing gloves, add them and chopped wild garlic , add some chicken or veg stock. Simmer for twenty mins , liquidise and add some cream, and black pepper and have it with some thick crusty bread.
     
  27. mr steev

    mr steev unkempt clacker

    I'll give it a go :)
     
  28. davesgcr

    davesgcr Reading books

    My seeded leeks have sprouted - and runner beans - (thank the Lord - new life)
     
  29. The39thStep

    The39thStep Was it over when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbour?

    I have some of these to germinate ( that hippy isn't me btw):

    [​IMG]

    Giant Bulgarian Leek
     
    mr steev likes this.
  30. Hulot

    Hulot Ooh, me parts!

    Put up a tiny shed over the weekend. I feel like the allotment is properly mine now.

    Also got my early potatoes planted.

    I'm thinking of trying to grow some daikon, but that'll need quite a depth. Anybody done this? How high might I need to build raised beds?
     

Share This Page